Вестник серия «Филологические науки» основан в 2008 году выходит 4 раза в год астана 2015 2



жүктеу 5.01 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
бет9/35
Дата09.01.2017
өлшемі5.01 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   35

Список литературы: 
1.
 
Каргин  А.С.,  Неклюдов  С.Ю.  Фольклор  и  фольклористика  третьего  тысячелетия  //  Первый 
Всероссийский конгресс фольклористов. Сборник докладов. Том 1. – М., 2005. – С. 14-28. – 448 с. 
2.
 
Кулагина  А.В.  Поэтика  фольклора:  итоги  и  перспективы  исследования  //  Первый  Всероссийский 
конгресс фольклористов. Сборник докладов. Том III. – М., 2006. – С. 42-54. – 440 с. 
3.
 
Панченко  А.А.  Фольклористика  как  наука  //  Первый  Всероссийский  конгресс  фольклористов. 
Сборник докладов. Том 1. – М., 2005. – С. 72-96. – 448 с. 
4.
 
Байбурин  А.К.  Фольклористика  и  этнография  сегодня  //  Первый  Всероссийский  конгресс 
фольклористов. Сборник докладов. Том III. – М., 2006. – С. 23-29. – 440 с. 
5.
 
Иванова Т.Г. Русская фольклористика в ХХ веке: проблемы историографии // Первый Всероссийский 
конгресс фольклористов. Сборник докладов. Том III. – М., 2006. – С. 134-147. 
6.
 
Путилов Б.Н.Фольклор и народная культура. – СПб: Наука, 1994. – 239 с. 
7.
 
Топорков  А.Л.  Фольклорные  формы  словесности  //  Теория  литературы.  –  Т.  3.  Роды  и  жанры 
(основные проблемы в историческом освещении). – М., 2003. – С. 133-157. 
8.
 
Абдулина  А.Б.  Методология  и  проблематика  регионального  изучения  фольклора  (на  материале 
русского фольклора Казахстана). – Алматы: КазГНУ, 1999. – 104 с. 
9.
 
Власова Г.И.Календарный и свадебный фольклор восточных славян Казахстана (на материале записей 
ХХ века). – Астана, 2007. – 368 с. 
10.
 
Багизбаева М.М. Русский фольклор Восточного Казахстана. – Алма-Ата: Рауан, 1991. – 512 с. 

 
53 
11.
 
Славянский фольклор Акмолинской области (на материале фольклорных экспедиций 1978-2006 гг.) / 
Ответ.редактор и составитель Г.И. Власова. – Астана, 2007. – 597 с. 
12.
 
Цветкова А.Д. Русская устная мифологическая проза Центрально-Северного Казахстана. - Павлодар, 
2006. – 264 с.; Фольклор Песчаной станицы /сост. А.Д. Цветкова, Н.М. Дударева. – Павлодар, 2011. 
13.
 
Славянский фольклор Северного Казахстана (на материале фольклорных экспедиций Казахстанского 
филиала  МГУ  имени  М.В.Ломоносова  2003-2007  гг.):  В  2-х  т.  /  ответ.ред.  Г.И.  Власова,  сост. 
Е.А.Доценко. – Астана, 2008. Том 1. – 342 с.; Том 2 – 272 с. 
 
 
Jonh Amor and Nick Sandars 
FIRST ENGLISH-LANGUAGE TRANSLATION  
OF DR BEISENOVA`S DOCTORAL THESIS 
 
 
Summary 
 
This  article  describes  the  translation  of  the  text  of  the  dissertation  research  professor 
Beisenova ZH.S on the problems of terminology and terminography. Also focuses on the features and 
requirements of the correct translation of academic text. 
 
 
Аңдатпа 
 
Бұл  мақалада  терминография  және  терминология  мәселесіне  арналған  профессор 
Ж.С.Бейсенованың  докторлық  диссертациясының  мәтінінің  аудармасы  туралы  айтылған. 
Сонымен қатар академиялық мәтіннің дұрыс аудармасының ерекшеліктеріне және қойылған 
талаптарына назар аударылған.  
 
 
Аннотация 
 
В  данной  статье  рассказывается  о  переводе  текста  научной  диссертации 
профессора Бейсеновой Ж.С., посвященной проблемам терминологии и терминографии. Также 
уделяется  внимание  особенностям  правильного  перевода  академического  текста  и 
требованиям к нему. 
 
 
It  is  a  great  pleasure  to  introduce  the  first  English-language  translation  of  Dr  Zhainagul 
Beisenova`s  doctoral  thesis.  We  have  worked  under  the  auspices  of  the  Aitmatov  Academy.  The 
Academy is a London-based Charity, dedicated to promoting Central Asian culture, primarily through 
presenting translations of Central Asian academic and literary texts to the English-language readership 
of the UK and beyond.  
 
An  English-language  translation  of  Dr  Beisenova`s  research  comes  at  a  particularly 
appropriate time in the University’s and Kazakhstan’s calendar, as it joins with all 47 Member States 
of  the  Council  of  Europe  to  celebrate  the  European  Day  of  Languages.  This  transnational  festival, 
celebrated  each  26  September,  brings  together  millions  of  people  who  take  part  in  activities  to 
promote  linguistic  diversity  and  the  ability  to  speak  other  languages,  and  encouraging  people 
everywhere  to  learn  more  languages  throughout  their  lives,  develop  their  multilingual  skills  and 
reinforce inter-cultural understanding. It is a perfect day to launch a translation, which itself is a study 
of the multilingualism that underpins so many aspects of Kazakh society. 
The thesis 
 
Dr Beisenova`s thesis itself takes up three fundamental positions. It first posits the existence 
of a `natural` or `universal` language that connects all language, echoing research traditions that date 
back  tj  the  very  beginnings  of  comparative  linguistics  and  philology.  A  theory  is  proposed  that  the 
formation of all words is motivated, which can be proved if their etymology can be traced far enough 
back  in  time.  The  theory  is  finally  exemplified  through  an  analysis  of  veterinary  terminology  in 
Kazakh and Russian. 
 
The three positions are considered in more detail in each of the three chapters of the thesis. 
 
Chapter  1  outlines  the  general  typology  of  subject-specific  terminology,  then  moving  on  to 
specific examples of these terminologies within Russian and Kazakh linguistics. Beisenova then lays 
out the background and rationale behind how subject-specific terminology is formed. She focuses on 

 
54 
where  terminological  variation  can  arise  from  and  why,  as  well  as  the  impact  of  terminological 
dichotomies,  including  normativity  versus  description,  detail  versus  brevity,  lexical  versus 
ideographic definition. 
 
Chapter 2 probes more deeply into the central elements of the thesis in a consideration of the 
functional and motivational nature of specialised terminology. Beisenova starts by introducing the full 
range  of  functional  status  found  in  Russian  and  Kazakh  terms,  including  nominative,  definitive, 
communicative and heuristic functions, and focusing in particular on the classificatory function. The 
enables  the  concept  of  Motivation  to  be  introduced  and  related  the  systemic  approach  to  describing 
and  defining  veterinary  terminology.  The  second  half  of  the  chapter  explores  the  extent  to  which 
national  and  cultural  characteristics  can  be  discerned  in  the  motivation  of  terms  related  to  animal 
disease  (zoonosis)  in  both  Russian  and  Kazakh.  The  study  combines  linguistic  classification  with  a 
classification  of  animal  disease  pathology,  according  a  range  of  criteria  derived  from  veterinary 
terminology  as  proposed  by  professional  terminologists.  This  leads  to  the  derivation  of  a  potential 
model of how Russian-Kazakh motivation-based dictionaries might start to be developed. The model 
derived  proposes  ten  motivations  with  the  basis  in  factors  covering  the  genus  and  species  of  a 
bacterium through to colour, geographical incidence and historical factors such as eponomy.  
 
The  third  chapter  concludes  the  study  with  a  consideration  of  what  further  work  is  needed 
across  the  world  of  terminology,  lexicography  and  linguistics  more  widely  in  order  to  combine  a 
research-based  and  diachronic  tracking  of  the  evolution  of  subject-specific  terminology  with  a  more 
prescriptive-leaning  element  of  terminological  systemisation  and  harmonisation  of  terminologies, 
which,  the  study  posits,  should  increase  the  accuracy  and  level  of  professional  specialisation  across 
disciplines within the Russian- and Kazakh-speaking research community and beyond.  
A translator`s perspective  
 
As Dr Beisenova is director of the translation department at Astana University, it seems fully 
appropriate  to  dwell  for  a  moment  on  the  actual  process  of  having  translated  her  research:  on  our 
approach,  the  theory  we  drew  on,  the  practical  tools  we  made  use  of  and  the  wider  pleasures, 
challenges, and surprises. 
 
Our  approach  drew  primarily  from  the  functionalist  school  of  translation  theory,  developed 
and  championed  perhaps  most  actively  by  Christiana  Nord  and  Hans  Vermeer.  It  centres  on  the  the 
translator’s first duty is to identify what the translation he or she is being commissioned to produce is 
destined  to  be  used  for.  The  new  ground  being  broken  by  the  Aitmatov  Academy  and  Astana 
University  in  this  project  presented  an  exciting  set  of  challenges  in  defining  our  skopos  or  overall 
translation  objective,  which  involved  coming  to  a  professional  judgment  based  on  a  triangulation 
between  information  derived  from  interviewing  our  commissioners,  web-based  research  and  the 
application of translation theory from Vermeer and Nord, through to Newmark and Venuti. 
 
Every text has its challenges, as the translator engages in the business of transferring meaning 
appropriate to the agreed function of the target text, while seeking to retain key aspects of the source 
text.  Our  text  presented  an  exciting  array  of  challenges.  Following  Mona  Baker`s  helpful  tripartite 
approach  to  translation  problems,  we  have  picked  out  one  issue  at  word  level,  phrase  level  and  text 
level, which we hope will be an insight into the pleasures and surprises we encountered along the way.  
 
At word level, the clearest challenge was that of the specialised terminology itself. 
 
At the phrase level, we found that accurate transfer to the norms of an anglophone academic 
readership  necessitated  a  readjustment  of  the  level  of  certainty  used  to  describe  theories,  empirical 
observations  and  conclusive  findings.  Whereas  in  source  text,  the  norm  appeared  to  be  a  more 
categorical  style,  involving  phrases  such  as  “without  doubt”  or  “these  people  possess  a  deeper 
knowledge of reality” a target text which retained an equivalent level of credibility would need to use 
renderings  such  as  “few  doubts  remain”  or  “some  claim/have  suggested  a  deeper  knowledge  for 
these people”. 
 
Finally,  at  the  text  level,  we  were  introduced  to  a  range  of  interesting  issues  cultural 
specificity. For example, the target text appeared to presuppose that a language is co-terminus with a 
nation (eg: “Every language forms its own conceptualisations of the world driven by its history of the 
nation.”). This notion was problematised within the target text itself by references to Russian, both in 
the  context  of  the  lingua  franca  of  the  USSR  and  as  a  national  language  of  at  least  two  existing 

 
55 
countries  of  the  CIS.  In  transfer  to  the  source  language  and  anglophone  academic  cultural  norms 
(insofar as they exist), we needed to consider how the elision of language and nation might resonate 
against cultural norms of languages crossing national borders, and of the place of minority languages 
within  one  or  more  countries.  This  led  to  formulations  such  as  “linguistic  community”  and  de-
emphasising of the notion of nations and borders.  
 
At  the  outset,  we  noted  that  this  was  the  first  translation  of  Dr  Beisenova`s  thesis  –  which 
logically  begs  the  question  why  a  second  or  subsequent  version  might  be  necessary.  As  translators, 
particularly having taken a functionalist approach to our work here, we are very aware of the need for 
different  audiences,  generations  and  subject  specialists  to  re-translate  according  to  their  own 
requirements. Perhaps this will be the start of a rich vein of translation and re-translation academic or 
investigation and research  from central  Asia. For now, it is but a first  step,  which  we  hope you  will 
enjoy as much as we did. 
 
Martin Wooding 
THE FUTURE OF INTERPRETATION IN KAZAKHSTAN
 
 
 
It  has  been  a  privilege  for  me  to  spend  three  weeks  teaching  conference  interpreting  at  the 
Kazakh  University  of  Humanities  and  Law  in  Astana.  Thanks  to  the  dynamism  and  initiative  of  the 
University,  but  also  to  the  directives  of  the  government,  it  is  possible  to  envisage  considerable 
potential for the interpreting sector in Kazakhstan. The purpose of this brief paper will be to estimate 
this potential and assess what needs to be done to develop it.  
 
Demand for interpreting arises from the international contacts of a country. Kazakhstan is a 
large  and  dynamic  country  at  the  centre  of  the  Eurasian  region,  with  a  very  broad  and  developing 
network of international political and commercial relations. It is a member or observer in around 60 
international organisations, beginning with the UN, and specialised agencies of the UN family like the 
UNDP,  UNEP  and  UNESCO,  as  well  as  UN  regional  groupings  in  both  Europe  and  Asia,  like 
UNECE and ESCAP. It works with the IMF, the World Bank, the IAEA and the OSCE. It is also an 
active  participant  in  regional  organizations  like  the  CIS,  EurAsEc,  the  Shanghai  Cooperation 
Organisation, the Conference on Interaction and Confidence-Building Measures in Asia and the North 
Atlantic  Cooperation  Council,  as  well  as  cultural  groupings  like  the  Organisation  of  Islamic 
Cooperation. 
 
It  is  necessary  to  stress  the  ambition  of  Kazakhstan  to  go  beyond  mere  membership  of 
organisations  and  to  play  an  active  role  on  the  world  stage  in  keeping  with  the  country's  size  and 
strategic position. It has already held, in 2010, the annual chairmanship of the OSCE, and has recently 
won the right to host the 2017 World EXPO. 
 
In addition, Kazakhstan enjoys bilateral diplomatic and commercial relations  with countries 
in  East  and  South  Asia,  the  Middle  East,  Europe  and  North  America.  Members  of  the  Mazhilis 
regularly  meet  with  parliamentary  colleagues  from  around  the  world.  Kazakhstan's  geographic 
situation makes it crucial to international transport projects like TRACECA. The country's economic 
potential  has  attracted  a  great  many  foreign  companies  (the  American  Chamber  of  Commerce  alone 
represents nearly 200 in 30 different sectors of industry). This is not to mention extensive cooperation 
between universities and academics. 
 
It is notoriously difficult, in any country, to measure statistically the number of international 
meetings,  but  this  picture  of  external  relations  indicates  that  contacts  with  speakers  of  different 
languages,  especially  in  the  capital  Astana,  will  be  frequent.  Most  of  the  meetings  are  likely  to  be 
bilateral  rather  than  multilateral.  Encounters  with  citizens  of  the  CIS  can  be  conducted  in  Russian, 
which Kazakhs speak fluently. However, those with citizens of other countries are likely at present to 
be handled by officials or employees with imperfect mastery of the required language, or by untrained 
interpreters. There are but few professional interpreters. 
 
Unfortunately  the  arguments  for  employing  a  trained  interpreter  are  often  not  obvious  to 
decision-takers. Those who would not hesitate to insist upon a trained doctor in matters of health, or a 
trained  lawyer  in  matters  of  law,  are  happy  to  entrust  their  affairs  to  chance  when  it  comes  to 

 
56 
international communication. Let us consider the reasons why it is preferable to employ professional 
interpreters. 
 
The first and most obvious is precision. An professional interpreter strives to convey meaning 
as  exactly  as  possible,  which  helps  both  parties  to  understand  each  other  better.  A  second  reason  is 
negotiating  advantage.  When  using  his  own  language,  through  an  interpreter,  a  speaker  can  employ 
the full range of arguments which he would not express so well in a foreign language. Thirdly, there is 
the  consideration  of  comfort.  You  feel  more  relaxed  when  speaking  and  listening  to  your  own 
language.  Finally,  but  certainly  not  least  of  all,  there  is  the  question  of  prestige.  A  speaker  who 
employs his own language, through an interpreter, commands respect for his cultural identity and his 
country. This aspect is very important in the political context. For all these reasons, it is just as vital 
for a country to train interpreters as doctors or lawyers. 
 
Let us now consider the types of action which must be taken by planners in order to meet the 
need  for  professional  interpretation.  First,  training  should  be  organized  at  university  level.  The 
solution  adopted  in  the  EU,  which  is  the  world  leader  in  interpreter  training,  has  been  to  offer  a 
Masters  rather  than  an  undergraduate  course.  The  main  argument  is  that  interpreting  is  a 
specialization,  and  should  not  be  combined  with  other  subjects.  In  addition,  postgraduate  students 
have had more time to perfect their language knowledge, and have more maturity to deal with stress, 
for interpreting is a stressful activity. 
 
Universities will often need to adapt their rules to design a suitable course. Interpreting is an 
activity  that  is  performed  orally,  so  the  exams  by  which  the  students  obtain  their  qualification  must 
consist of them interpreting oral speeches. Written exams cannot test interpreting skill. Interpreting is 
also a practical activity, which improves only through regular exercise. Theory may be interesting, but 
you don't need theory to be a good interpreter, so the curriculum should not focus on book learning. 
Correspondingly, the best teachers are not academics, but people who exercise the profession.  
 
Interpreting classes should also be relatively small, ideally no more than six to eight. This is 
again  because  the  tuition  will  consist  in  practice  sessions,  and  only  one  student  practices  at  a  time, 
while the others form a critical audience. In a large group, students will be inactive for long periods 
and some will risk becoming distracted. Correspondingly, selection criteria, in the form of an aptitude 
test,  should  be  applied  to  candidates  before  accepting  them  on  a  course.  The  course  should  not  be 
open  to  any  student  who  wishes  to  apply,  irrespective  of  motivation  or  aptitude.  Moreover, 
interpreting  students  must  be  granted  access  to  real  job  experience.  For  example,  if  a  foreign  guest 
visits the university a promising student should be allowed to interpret for him. This helps to motivate 
the student and allows him to understand the challenge of a real-life assignment. 
 
Many or all of these conditions may require universities to depart from established academic 
custom  or  adapt  their  statutes.  In  some  cases,  there  may  be  obstacles  at  the  level  of  the  Ministry  of 
Education. Nonetheless, if a country is to train professional interpreters, it must cater for the specific 
profile of the trainee interpreter. 
 
It is helpful for training courses to maintain contact with other courses, within the country but 
especially beyond its borders. Interpreting is by definition an international business. Both teachers and 
students  should  ideally  be  able  to  spend  time  in  other  centres.  Teacher  and  student  mobility  is 
practiced a lot in Europe. Another valuable  means of contact,  which avoids the expense and time of 
travel, is videoconferencing. In Europe we have developed a system whereby the video image can be 
combined  with  multiple  streamed  audio  channels,  to  allow  for  simultaneous  interpreting  in  several 
languages.  We  use  this  system  for  what  we  call  virtual  classes,  whereby  students  in  different 
geographic locations practice with each other. 
 
Potential employers should also be invited to involve themselves in interpreter training. This 
enables them to influence training standards and convey to students the demands of real life. They can 
also help by providing authentic speeches as practice  material for the  students. The  mutual relations 
between  an  employer  and  a  university  may  usefully  be  set  out  in  writing,  in  the  form  of  a 
memorandum  of  understanding.  The  European  Parliament,  for  example,  as  a  major  employer,  has 
several such agreements with universities. 
 
University  authorities  need  to  appreciate  that  interpreter  training  involves  certain 
expenditure. It has already been  mentioned that the ideal teacher-student ratio  will be high, and that 

 
57 
outside professionals will need to be hired. A capital outlay is required for the basic equipment, which 
consists  in  a  high-quality  sound  system  and  booths.  A  video  camera  is  very  useful  to  record  the 
students from time to time and let them criticize their performance on screen. We mentioned too that 
video conferencing and audio streaming allow virtual classes with other universities. 
 
Another  major  question  is  how  professional  quality  is  protected  on  the  interpreting  market. 
Employers  need  to  be  presented  with  some  form  of  certification  which  will  guarantee  to  them  that 
they are  hiring competent professionals. Where universities comply  with the  necessary requirements 
for  training,  the  degree  itself  will  function  as  a  brand.  Beyond  that  it  will  be  up  to  interpreters 
themselves to form a professional association which ensures quality standards.  
 
A further challenge is to ensure that a country has the conference rooms and the equipment 
which will allow it to make proper use of interpretation. The best interpreter cannot perform properly 
if  the  technical  conditions  are  not  met.  Public  employers  can  take  the  lead  by  purchasing  or  hiring 
equipment  which  meets  international  standards.  One  of  the  facilities  which  Astana  may  need  as  it 
prepares for the 2017 EXPO is an international conference centre. 
In conclusion, I propose to speculate on some future trends, assuming that conditions can be met for a 
regular supply of trained interpreters. In so doing, I base myself upon the experience of other countries 
which have gone through the same process. 
 
First,  demand  will  increase  with  supply.  Once  employers  perceive  the  benefits  of  good 
interpretation,  they  will  ask  for  it  again.  The  growth  potential,  as  globalization  continues,  is  huge. 
Second,  there  will  be  increasing  specialization.  In  the  beginning,  interpreters  may  need  to  combine 
interpreting  with  other  tasks,  especially  translation,  but  as  the  market  develops  they  will  have  more 
opportunities to focus on interpreting and in turn improve their performance with experience. Third, in 
the  early  stages  interpreters  will  be  employed  on  the  staff  of  large  organisations,  be  it  ministries  or 
companies,  which  generate  a  sufficient  volume  of  work.  The  Mazhilis,  for  example,  already  has  its 
own  staff  interpreters.  However,  as  more  conference  opportunities  arise,  staffers  will  obtain 
permission  from  their  organisation  to  accept  occasional  freelance  work.  Eventually,  true  freelances 
may emerge who are no longer dependent on any one organisation. 
 
Finally  I  would  be  willing  to  speculate  that  the  state  language  Kazakh  will  increase  in 
importance. I would expect this to be a gradual process, but as professional interpreters emerge it will 
be  possible  for  meeting  participants  to  speak  Kazakh  rather  than  Russian,  and  still  be  understood 
internationally. 
 
I would like to wish success to all those involved in developing conference interpretation in 
Kazakhstan: the university teachers, the national authorities, and especially the students who will one 
day perform this important role. 
 
 
УДК 81’0 
Ainur T. Bayekeyeva 

жүктеу 5.01 Kb.

Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   35




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет