Вестник Казахстанско-Американского


ВОПРОСЫ ПРЕПОДАВАНИЯ ЯЗЫКОВ



жүктеу 5.1 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
бет45/53
Дата25.04.2017
өлшемі5.1 Kb.
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   53

ВОПРОСЫ ПРЕПОДАВАНИЯ ЯЗЫКОВ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
232 
difference.  The  latter  technique  gives  adult 
learners  another  chance  and  tells  them  that 
they  are  capable  of  self-correction,  while  the 
former technique carries the message “You do 
not  meet  our  requirements.”  Such  a  message 
can  also  be  communicated  when  the  teacher 
answers her own questions before students can 
do so they, a very common classroom practice. 
It  is  not  surprising  that  weak  students,  who 
need  more  positive  feedback  than  their  more 
proficient  classmates,  get  less  time  (and 
teacher’s  patience)  to  answer  than  high 
achievers in the class. They are just ignored by 
the teacher. 
Adult learners are also judgmental when 
they  express  their  approval  or  disapproval, 
show  impatience,  or  mock  one  another.  The 
teacher  can  control  this  behavior;  as  in  many 
cases,  it  reveals  in  a  competitive  classroom 
atmosphere.  If  the  teacher  eliminates  or  mini-
mizes  competition  for  the  sake  of  collabora-
tion,  there  will  be  fewer  opportunities  for 
judgmental  behavior  by  classmates.  All  the 
sneers,  giggles,  and  snide  remarks  manifested 
by the show-off and aimed at winning teacher 
approval are  out of place  if the teacher  makes 
it  clear  that  students  are  expected  to  work  to-
gether toward a common goal. 
Adult  learners  may  feel  isolated  if  they 
are  made to feel anonymous. Teachers should 
use students’ names when eliciting and asking 
questions  [6].  Every  student  in  the  classroom 
is a person first, with a family, hobbies, likes, 
and  dislikes.  It  is  the  task  of  the  teacher  to 
tactfully  enquire  about  those  areas  of  the  stu-
dent’s  life  and  to  get  other  students  interested 
in them.  
Feeling  isolated  may  also  be  caused  by 
feeling  disregarded.  Very  often  teachers  tend 
to  have  their  favorite  students.  Their  favorit-
ism  is  manifested  in  classrooms  mainly  by 
inconsistent  error  correction  and  unfair  distri-
bution  of  turns.  The  best-liked  students  have 
more  opportunities  to  speak  and  their  errors 
are often disregarded. 
Students  may  also  feel  isolated  if  they 
feel deserted by the teacher - left on their own 
in a classroom where no assistance is received 
from  the  teacher.  Furthermore,  adult  learners 
have  every  reason  to  feel  isolated  if,  in  addi-
tion, they find that learning a foreign language 
is  reduced  to  drills  and  has  no  connection  to 
real life situations. 
The feeling of being alone among one’s 
adult learners is not uncommon in highly terri-
torial classrooms in which students never want 
to  change  their  seats  or  switch  conversation 
partners.  Thus,  peer  favoritism,  with  manifes-
tations  similar  to  teacher  favoritism,  can  con-
tribute to feelings of isolation. 
The  arrangement  of  desks  can  also  cre-
ate  or  contribute  to  isolation  inside  the  class-
room. If students do not face one another, or if 
someone  has  a  place  that  does  not  allow  eye 
contact  with  the  teacher  and  fellow  students, 
feelings of not belonging will grow.  
The  failure  to  manage  classroom  dis-
course  is  the  main  reason  students  sometimes 
feel they are being  deprived  of control. When 
turn stealing replaces turn taking such feelings 
can occur. If a student is always late to answer 
a  general  solicit  and  personal  solicits  directed 
to  him  are  frequently  appropriated  by  others, 
the  student  will  feel  he  lacks  control  over  his 
role  in  classroom  interaction.  Similar  feelings 
may occur if group members are not willing to 
listen  to  one  another,  openly  show  lack  of  in-
terest,  or  interrupt  the  speaker.  The  teacher’s 
explanations, if unclear or unsatisfactory, may 
lead  to  comparable  frustration,  and  the  learn-
ers feel they have no control over the language 
as a system. Finally, the feeling of loss of con-
trol may be caused by a domineering, control-
ling  teacher,  who  leaves  students  feeling  that 
they  have  no  influence  over  what  is  going  on 
in the classroom. 
A  fourth  aspect  of  the  inhibiting  lan-
guage classroom has to do with feeling unwor-
thy.  If  a  course  is  held  in  sub-standard  prem-
ises and taught by an unqualified teacher, stu-
dents may subconsciously assume, “I get what 
I  deserve.”  In  other  words,  if  students  receive 
substandard  teaching,  then  they  are  likely  to 
believe they are substandard learners.  
There  is  a  wrong  statement  that  adult 
learners  who  feel  anxious  during  the  process 
of  learning a foreign  language cannot succeed 
in  mastering  languages.  However,  comparing 
such students with more successful learners A. 
Turula  discovered  that  it  is  much  harder  for 
anxious  adult  learners  to  achieve  success  in 
this sphere [11]. 
Thus, a teacher should take into consid-
eration  all  psychological  characteristics  of 
adults  to  make  the  process  of  learning  for  an 
adult  learner  much  easier.  An  adult  learner 

ВОПРОСЫ ПРЕПОДАВАНИЯ ЯЗЫКОВ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
233 
wants  the  learning  process  to  meet  all  his  ex-
pectations.  Theoretical  material  should  be 
given  briefly  and  effectively.  The  content  of 
texts  and  exercises  should  raise  his  interest. 
The  methods,  on  the  one  hand,  should  coin-
cide his ability to perceive the knowledge con-
sciously, and on the  other hand, to provide an 
active and cheery lesson after an intense work-
ing day. 
 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 
1.  Вербицкая  Н.О.  Образование  взрослых 
на  основе  их  жизненного  (витагенного) 
опыта. // Педагогика – 2002 - №6 – с.14-
19. 
2.  Змеев  С.И.  Основы  андрагогики:  Учеб-
ное  пособие  для  вузов.:  М.:  Флинта: 
Наука, 1999. – 152 с. 
3.  Колкер  Я.М.,  Устинова  Е.С.  Практиче-
ская  методика  обучения  иностранному 
языку. М.: Академия, 2000. 
4.  Кулюткин  Ю.Н.  Психология  обучения 
взрослых. М., 1985. 
5.  Степанова  Е.И.  Психология  взрослых: 
экспериментальная  акмеология.  -  СПб., 
2000.  
6.  Davies  P.,  Rinvolucri  M.  The  confidence 
book. Harlow, U.K., 1990. 
7.  Hadfield  J.  Classroom  dynamics.  Oxford, 
1992. 
8.  Hendricson  Andrew.  Adult  Education. 
Ohio, 1960. 
9. Kamla M. Teaching EFL to adults: Between 
must and must not. English teaching forum. 
1992. 
10.  Lorge  I.  Adult  Learning  //  Adult  Educa-
tion. N.Y., 1952. 
11.  Turula,  A.  2004.  ‘Language  Anxiety  and 
Classroom  Dynamics:  A  study  of  Adult 
Learners’.  English  Teaching  Forum,  vol. 
40, no 4. 
12.  Smith  R.M.  Learning  How  to  Learn.  Ap-
plied  Theory  for  Adults.  –  Milton  Keynes, 
1983. 
 
 
 
УДК 004.9+372: 811.111.1 
EXPLORING POSSIBILITIES OF USING INTERACTIVE BOARD 
SOFTWARE IN LANGUAGE TEACHING 
Krylova Y. 
 
In  the  last  few  years,  the  number  of 
teachers using computers has increased. Com-
puters  and  language  teaching  have  walked 
hand  to  hand  for  a  long  time  and  contributed 
as teaching tools in the second language class-
room.  A  lot  of  books  and  articles  have  been 
written  about  the  role  of  computers  in  educa-
tion  in  the  21st  century.  There  are  many  ad-
vantages and  disadvantages of these technolo-
gies  and  the  authors’  options  are  very  incon-
sistent. 
The  large  amount  of  articles  is  devoted 
to  global  changing  of  an  education  system. 
Some changes that occur in the  world  of  edu-
cation  are  the  result  of  a  reflection  on  the  in-
evitable  development  of  pedagogical  and  di-
dactic  theories.  Others  are  due  to  requests  by 
society  about  new  generations’  education.  In 
the  current  landscape,  there  is  an  indisputable 
need  for  new  generations  to  master  different 
communication  channels.  The  school,  as  the 
main  educational institution, cannot be  imper-
vious  to  changes,  but  should  try  to  work  best 
to adapt to them. Therefore, the school system 
is  called  to  suggest  how  to  use  and  integrate 
new technologies in its daily actions, consider-
ing them as potential new strategies and teach-
ing  methodologies.  Teaching  with  technology 
means  to  support  the  use  of  technological 
equipment  to  encourage  learning.  The  new 
technical tools can be a great way to character-
ize the learning proposal in an innovative edu-
cation system as it  makes a significant contri-
bution to the effectiveness of the teaching and 
learning  process.  They  should  be  introduced 
through  a  valid  educational  mediation,  so  it 
becomes  necessary  that  the  use  of  new  infor-
mation  technologies  is  well  planned.  As 
Schwartz  [1]  stated:  "A  pedagogy,  that  uses 
multimedia,  is  formed  by  the  scientifically 
organized  combination  of  materials  and  me-
dia,  in  which  the  teacher  becomes  an  element 
of mediation between students, understanding, 
skills and media". 

ВОПРОСЫ ПРЕПОДАВАНИЯ ЯЗЫКОВ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
234 
In many articles authors discuss some of 
the  ways  that  computers  can  be  used  in  Eng-
lish language teaching, with a view to helping 
teachers  make  the  most  of  the  opportunities 
they  offer  to  students.  It  is  helpful  to  think  of 
the  computer  as  having  the  following  main 
roles in the language classroom: 
teacher - the computer teaches students 
new language  
tester-  the  computer  tests  students  on 
language already learned  
tool  -  the  computer  assists  students  to 
do certain tasks  
data  source  -  the  computer  provides 
students with the information they need to per-
form a particular task  
communication  facilitator  -  the  com-
puter  allows  students  to  communicate  with 
others in different locations  
Computer  as  a  teacher.  In  the  early 
days  of  computers  and  programmed  learning, 
some  students  sat  at  a  terminal  for  extended 
periods following different learning programs. 
In  such  programs,  students  can  listen  to  dia-
logues or watch video clips. They can click on 
pictures  to  call  up  the  names  of  the  objects 
they see. They can speak  into the  microphone 
and immediately hear a recording of what they 
have  said.  The  program  can  keep  a  record  of 
their progress, e.g. the vocabulary learned, and 
offer  remedial  help  if  necessary.  Many  of 
these CD ROM programs are  offered as com-
plete  language  courses.  They  require  students 
to spend hours in front of the computer screen, 
usually attached to a microphone headset. An-
other of their serious drawbacks is the fact that 
in many cases the course content and sequence 
is fixed. The teacher has no chance to  include 
materials that are of interest and importance to 
the particular students in his or her class. 
Computer as a tester. The computer is 
very  good at  what is  known as drill and prac-
tice;  it  will  present  the  learner  with  questions 
and announce  if the answer  is right  or wrong. 
In  its  primitive  manifestations  in  this  particu-
lar  role  in  language  teaching,  it  has  been 
rightly  criticized.  The  main  reason  for  the 
criticism  is simple:  many  early  drill and prac-
tice  programs  were  too  easy;  either  multiple-
choice  or  demanding  a  single  word  answer. 
They  were  not  programmed  to  accept  varying 
input  and  the  only  feedback  they  gave  was 
Right or Wrong. So for example, if the com-
puter  expected  the  answer  "does  not"  and  the 
student  typed,  "doesn't",  it  would  have  been 
told  she  was  wrong  without  any  further  com-
ment.  It  is  not  surprising  that  such  programs 
gave  computers  a  bad  name  with  many  lan-
guage  teachers.  Unfortunately,  there  are  now 
very  many  of  these  primitive  drill  and  kill 
programs flooding the Internet.  
Despite  their  disadvantages,  such  pro-
grams are popular with many students. This is 
probably because the student is in full control; 
the  computer  is  extremely  patient  and  gives 
private,  unthreatening  feedback.  Most  pro-
grams also keep the score and have animations 
and  sounds,  which  many  students  like.  There 
are some programs which do offer more useful 
feedback  than  right  or  wrong,  or  that  can  ac-
cept varying input. Such programs
 
can be rec-
ommended  to  students  who  enjoy  learning 
grammar  or  vocabulary  in  this  way.  If  two  or 
more  students  sit  at  the  same  computer,  then 
they  can  generate  a  fair  amount  of  authentic 
communication  while  discussing  the  answers 
together. 
Computer  as  a  tool.  It  is  in  this  area 
that the authors think the computer has been a 
great  success  in  language  teaching.  Spread-
sheets,  presentation  slide  generators,  concor-
dances  and  web  page  producers  all  have  their 
place  in  the  language  classroom,  particularly 
in one where the main curricular focus is task-
based  or  project-work.  The  most  important 
role of the computer in the language classroom 
is its use as a writing tool. It has played a sig-
nificant  part  in  the  introduction  of  the  writing 
process,  by  allowing  students  easily  to  pro-
duce  multiple  drafts  of  the  same  piece  of 
work.  Students  with  a  bad  handwriting  can 
now  do  a  piece  of  work  to  be  proud  of,  and 
those with poor spelling skills can, after suffi-
cient training in using the spell check, produce 
a piece of writing largely free of spelling mis-
takes.  
Computer  as  a  data  source.  I'm  sure 
we  don't  need  to  say  much  about  the  Internet 
as a provider of information. Anyone who has 
done  a  search  on  the  World  Wide  Web  will 
know  that  there  is  already  more  information 
out  there  than  an  individual  could  process  in 
hundred  lifetimes,  and  the  amount  is  growing 
by  the  second.  This  huge  source  of  informa-
tion is an indispensable resource for much pro-
ject work, but there are serious negative impli-

ВОПРОСЫ ПРЕПОДАВАНИЯ ЯЗЫКОВ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
235 
cations.  We  shudder  to  think  of  how  much 
time  has  been  wasted  and  will  continue  to  be 
wasted  by  students  who  aimlessly  wander  the 
Web  with  no  particular  aim  in  mind  and  with 
little or no guidance. 
Computer  as  a  communication  facili-
tator. The Internet is the principal medium by 
which  students  can  communicate  with  others 
at  a  distance,  (e.g.  by  e-mail  or  by  participat-
ing in discussion forums). Some teachers have 
set  up  joint  projects  with  a  school  in  another 
location and others encourage students to take 
part  in  discussion  groups.  There  is  no  doubt 
that such activities are motivating for students 
and allow them to participate in many authen-
tic  language  tasks.  However,  teachers  may 
wish  to  closely  supervise  their  students'  mes-
sages.  Recent  research  has  shown  up  the  ex-
tremely  primitive  quality  of  much  of  the  lan-
guage used in electronic exchanges! [2] 
 Nowadays 
many 
classrooms 
are 
equipped  by  the  computer  with  an  interactive 
board and we can find a lot of articles devoted 
to using of this equipment and the software to 
it. 
Language  learning  depends  very  much 
on  emotion  and  attention.  Therefore,  it  is  im-
portant  that  the  mode  of  communication  of 
contents creates genuine interest, as in the case 
of  multimedia.  The  adoption  of  multimedia 
directly  affects  cognitive  processes  and  thus 
also  teaching  and  learning.  On  a  practical 
level,  in  a  multimedia  environment,  the  lan-
guage input (words and structure) can be made 
substantial  being  contextualized  by  images 
and sounds, in order to be recognized and eas-
ily  understood.  The  fact  that  the  input  is  pre-
sented  in  different  ways  seems  to  facilitate 
learning,  not  only  because  it  helps  the  infer-
ence and the ability to infer meaning using the 
context,  but  also  due  to  the  memorization  of 
the  input  language  and  its  reproduction.  Me-
diation  input  through  graphics  and  sound  re-
quires less energy at the level of cognitive lin-
guistic decoding, allowing time to spend those 
energies  on  the  input  elaboration.  With  the 
development  of  new  technologies,  there  has 
been a steady increase of possibilities of action 
and  interaction thanks to the transition  from a 
"received"  multimedia to an  "interacted"  mul-
timedia (video games, simulation, virtual real-
ity) up to a "constructed" multimedia (creating 
environments  of  personal  expression,  multi-
media desks). 
An  example  of  new  media  technology, 
recently  introduced  in  the  classroom  is  the 
Interactive Board (IB). Interactivity is the cen-
tral  innovation  for  this  board,  as  the  contents 
that  are  displayed  can  be  dragged,  clicked, 
edited and processed directly on its surface, as 
it  is  normally  done  on  a  computer.  Every  ob-
ject on the IB can also be “catches”, or photo-
graphed  using  software  supplied  with  the 
board  and  every  action  can  be  recorded  in 
video format. The IB is a multimedia tool, be-
cause it allows the simultaneous use of differ-
ent  channels.  According  to  Beeland  [3]  with 
the IB it is possible to integrate three different 
types of access to knowledge: visual, auditory 
and tactile.  Bonaiuti [4] stated that "is the  co-
existence within the same tool of a plurality of 
communication channels to make a difference: 
they  are  made  available,  within  the  same  in-
teractive work environment, different contents 
(text,  audio  and  visual),  and  also  different 
modes  of  manipulation  and  control".  In  the 
international  scene  for  several  years,  research 
is under way aimed at identifying its potential 
and  specific  characteristics.  Here  are  some  of 
the  highlighted  potentials  discovered  so  far 
[5]: 
-  allows  the  visualization  of  concepts 
through pictures, maps, photos, movies, etc.; 
-  allows  an  integrated  use  of  ICT  in 
teaching and different teaching methods; 
-  the  materials  produced  can  be  stored, 
allowing  a  reflection  on  the  metacognitive 
process and product carried out; 
- leads to a development of digital com-
petences; 
-  helps  students  to  practice  their  cogni-
tive skills, promoting learning; 
- improves the focus and motivation be-
cause it increases the pace of lessons; 
-  helps  teachers  to  structure  and  plan 
their lessons in advance; 
- increases student participation. 
The  IB  provides  the  opportunity  to  be-
gin  to  experience  directly  in  the  classroom  a 
continuum of languages and signs. Maragliano 
[6] states that “the  effort of  educators and  de-
signers of training should be geared to making 
the school one of the privileged field where is 
processed an «interpretation of signs»”. 
With  Activstudio  (software  to  IB)  we 
can make our Activboard speak any language. 

ВОПРОСЫ ПРЕПОДАВАНИЯ ЯЗЫКОВ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
236 
For  this  reason,  the  ability  to  use  sounds  in 
Activstudio makes it an excellent, flexible tool 
for  teachers  of  modern  foreign  languages. 
What’s  more,  teachers  no  longer  have  to 
worry  about  getting  their  tape  recorder  or  CD 
stuck  in  the  wrong  place.  Now,  sound  clips 
can  easily  be  placed  in  a  flipchart  and  can  be 
activated  at  the  click  of  an  Activpen.  This 
flexibility  means  that  various  people  can  be 
used saying the same phrases. As well as play-
ing sounds, Activstudio offers us the ability to 
record  them.  If  we  have  a  microphone  con-
nected  to  our  computer,  we  can  record  our 
students’  speaking  exercises  and  then  play 
them  back.  Our  students  could  take  charge  of 
the  process  of  recording  and  listening  to  their 
own sentences. 
If  our  students  groan  at  the  thought  of 
grammar,  Activstudio  offers  a  huge  range  of 
techniques  to  make  grammar  as  serious  or  as 
simple  as  we  want.  Using  a  simple  drag  and 
drop  techniques,  get  our  students  up  to  the 
board to  drag answers to  questions. Using the 
Pen  tool,  alternatively,  we  could  get  students 
to draw lines connecting questions to answers. 
Matching,  sorting  and  ordering  exercises  can 
quickly  be  created  on  the  board  to  help  back 
up  students’  language  skills  and  to  get  them 
involved in the lesson. Another simple advan-
tage  of  Activstudio  is  that  mistakes  can 
quickly  be  deleted.  Using  the  Restart  button 
we can reset the  whole  exercise  if  we  need to 
start again.  
A  number  of  special  interactive  tools 
are  available  in  Activstudio  to  help  vary  the 
way in which lessons are taught. The Spotlight 
tool  is  useful  for  ‘odd  one  out’  exercises, 
while the Reveal tool  is a perfect  way of pre-
senting a list  of bullet points to a class. Other 
presentation tools can add pace and an element 
of  chance  to  lessons.  With  the  Clock  tool  we 
can  put  a  time  limit  on  an  activity.  The  Dice 
tool can, of course, be used for a huge range of 
grammar  games.  It  can  also  be  used  at  any 
time  to  add  an  element  of  chance  to  a  task– 
who goes next? Who replies to the question? 
Activstudio  gives  foreign  language 
teachers  the  chance  to  focus  precisely  on  the 
vocabulary  that  is  being  learned.  Text  can  be 
copied  between  a  number  of  pages.  We  can 
play  with  those  words;  put  them  in  different 
contexts,  make  students  work  with  them  in 
different  ways.  To  make  the  most  of  Ac-
tivboards we can use colors to highlight verbs 
and  nouns, or the  masculine  or feminine parts 
of a word. The pace of the class can be varied 
thanks to the ability to have as many pages as 
you want in a flipchart. 
Class  preparation  is  easier  and  more 
productive  with  Activstudio.  All  our  prepara-
tion  can  be  tied  together  in  one  flipchart.  Ex-
ercises can be printed out so that what our stu-
dents see on the board is tied in with the pages 
they use at their desks.
 
It is worth finding that 
fantastic image or honing an excellent exercise 
because  none  of  your  ideas  are  ever  wasted. 
Flipcharts  can  be  saved,  copied  and  reused. 
You  can  share  them  with  colleagues  and  col-
leagues can share their/flipcharts with you. 
Images  can  also  play  an  important  part 
in helping students to remember what they are 
learning.  With  the  help  of  the  internet,  you 
have  a  bottomless  pit  of  information  and  im-
ages - in the target language - at your disposal. 
Gone are the  days  when  we  had to bring suit-
cases full of magazines, newspapers and other 
products  back  from  vacation  to  help  with  our 
teaching.  It  is  all  available  on  the  internet. 
Text and images can be dragged straight from 
Activstudio’s  web  browser  onto  the  flipchart 
page.  Clips  from  today’s  news  can  be  shown 
to  students  in  the  target  language.  Language 
students often respond to a language when it is 
placed in context. With your Activboard there 
are more opportunities to do this than ever. 
Finally,  once  we’ve  created  a  perfect 
flipchart,  with  a  variety  of  interactive  exer-
cises  -  including  sounds,  video,  color  and  a 
range of presentation techniques – we have the 
ability to create links to other websites for fur-
ther  ideas  and  materials.  Links  are  another 
important  tool  in  Activstudio.  You  can  create 
menu  pages  within  a  flipchart,  letting  your 
students  choose  from  a  selection  of  topics,  or 
you  can  link  to  other  resources  you  have 
available on your computer. 
With the vast range of resources and the 
variety  of  interaction  techniques  available  in 
Activstudio, the teaching of foreign languages 
has  moved  up  a  gear.  Now  languages  can  be 
brought  to  life  in  the  classroom  with  the  help 
of your Activboard and Activstudio [7]. 
Many  articles  represent  results  of  re-
searches in revealing of advantages and disad-
vantages  of  using  computers  in  language 
teaching.  The  authors  describe  projects  that 
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   53




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет