Вестник Казахстанско-Американского


МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ



жүктеу 5.1 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
бет38/53
Дата25.04.2017
өлшемі5.1 Kb.
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   53

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
197 
One  of  the  teacher's  main  functions 
when  training  students  to  rend  is  not  only  to 
persuade them  of the advantages  of skimming 
and  scanning,  but  also  to  make  them  see  that 
the way they read is vitally important. 
Teachers  are  often  discouraged  by  the 
inefficient reading methods of otherwise fluent 
students.  Many  foreign-language  students  in 
secondary and tertiary institutions cannot keep 
up  with  their  assignments  and  blame  their 
slow  reading  speed.  Despite  our  best  efforts, 
we  find  students  struggling  word-for-word 
through  a  text,  plowing  on  from  beginning  to 
end  and  stumbling  at  every  unfamiliar  item. 
Unfortunately,  such  slow  and  wasteful  proce-
dures  are  commonly  due  to  a  lack  of  reading 
confidence created by the very manner of their 
learning in EFL classes [2; p. 13]. 
The types of tasks set in reading classes 
frequently  reflect  wholly  artificial  objectives, 
demanding  the  kind  of  grammatical  attention 
or total comprehension rarely required in  eve-
ryday  life.  Such  close  textual  scrutiny  seems 
to  increase  the  anxiety  that  inhabits  the  read-
ing flexibility of many students. They come to 
believe  that  there  is  only  one  correct  way  to 
read, and this seriously hampers their students. 
The  problem  stems  from  the  fact  that 
reading  classes  are  often  used  to  teach  lan-
guage  rather  than  reading.  Texts  are  either 
milked  of  every drop of  meaning by intensive 
study  or  employed  as  vehicles  for  presenting 
linguistic patterns. 
Teachers  must  use  reading  lessons  to 
develop  students’  reading  proficiency  rather 
than improving linguistic competence. 
The purpose of reading a particular text 
is  the  most  important  determinant  of  reading 
strategy.  We  do  not  always  require  the  same 
level  of  comprehension,  detail,  or  recall  from 
our reading, and we have to convince our stu-
dents  that  it  is  efficient  and  profitable  to  vary 
their  technique  and  speed  according  to  their 
purpose in reading. 
To  sensitize  students  to  different  read-
ing purposes  it is useful to  get them to keep a 
log  of  everything  they  read  in  their  L1  in  24 
hours.  This  should  include  everything  from 
cereal  packaging  to  timetables  or  chemistry 
texts. We than need to elicit what the students 
hoped to get from their reading  on  each  occa-
sion,  extracting  from  the  many  and  various 
reasons for reading the actual type of informa-
tion  sought.  This  will  create  an  awareness  of 
these high-level purposes. 
The  next  step  is  to  show  students  that 
different tasks require different degrees of un-
derstanding  and  attention.  While  extremely 
useful  in  many  study  situations,  the  skills  de-
veloped  through  intensive  analysis  of  short 
texts  are  not  always  appropriate,  and  students 
may be surprised to learn that they do not have 
to  read  everything  or  give  equal  weight  to 
each word. 
This  can  be  demonstrated  by  getting 
students  to  reconstruct  closed  texts  or  read 
passages  with  all  “grammar”  words  removed. 
It is rare that a text will contain less than 20% 
of  articles,  connectives,  prepositions,  modals 
and  so  on,  which  are  usually  automatically 
skimmed  in  the  L1,  and  by  efficient  native 
English speakers. 
More  importantly  however,  students 
need  to  realize  that  texts  contain  information 
of  varying  importance  to  the  purpose  in  read-
ing.  To  make  students  aware  of  the  relation-
ship  between  purpose  and  strategy,  give  them 
a  series  of  different  reading  tasks  based  on 
some  of  the  main  purposes  derived  from  the 
sample  situations.  For  example,  the  following 
kinds of exercises might be used: 
1)  Read  a  technical/scholarly  text  care-
fully to prepare for detailed exam questions on 
its context. 
2) Read a similar text to find the answer 
to  a  particular  question  without  looking  back 
in the text. 
3)  Find  one  book  containing  the  rele-
vant material for a particular topic area from a 
10-item reading list. 
4) Read several movie reviews to decide 
which  one  to  see  this  weekend.  Students 
should  notice  the  actors’  names,  general  plot 
information,  and  the  reviewer’s  overall  opin-
ion. 
These  exercises  can  be  timed  and  as-
sessed  for  accuracy.  If  students’  scores  for 
speed and  comprehension  in them are similar, 
then they are approaching all these tasks in the 
same  way.  They  have  developed  the  habit  of 
reading  every  text  from  beginning  to  end  and 
need  to  be  taught  the  advantages  of  explicitly 
identifying  their  purpose  before  starting  to 
read. 
Reading  efficiency  means  approaching 
every  reading  task  with  a  clear  purpose  and 

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
198 
with the flexibility to adjust reading strategy to 
the purpose at hand [3; p.88]. 
The  burden  is  therefore  on  the  teacher 
to  provide  reading  tasks  that  exploit  different 
techniques.  Table  2  summarizes  the  relation-
ship  between  high-level  purposes  and  reading 
strategies. 
 
Table 2: Ways of reading for main purposes 
PURPOSE 
STRATEGY 
METHOD 
To  obtain  a  general  out-
line 
Surveying 
Use  reference  and  non-text  data  including 
typographical and graphical information. 
Read  first  and  last  paragraphs  and  topic 
sentences. 
To  search  for  a  specific 
idea, fact, or detail 
Scanning 
Run  eyes  quickly  down  the  page  looking 
for a clue, then return to normal speed. 
To  extract  key  ideas  and 
gist. Review reading 
Skimming 
Eyes  hurry  across  the  page  picking  out  the 
central information only. 
Reading  for  recall  or 
total accuracy 
Various  +  Intensive 
reading 
Survey structure, phrase read. 
Close  re-reading  with  note-taking  and 
summary writing. 
Reading  for  pleasure  or 
relaxation 
Phrase reading 
Use  of  wide-eye  span  and  fewer  fixation 
points 
Recognition of sense groups. 
 
Because there seems to be some  confu-
sion  about  the  main  extensive  reading  skills-
often  because  they  are  merged  together  and 
their  features  obscured  –  a  briefly  review  on 
them  can  be  done  below  and  some  classroom 
approaches can be suggested. 
Surveying  is  a  strategy  for  quickly  and 
efficiently previewing text content and organi-
zation using referencing and non-text material. 
Although  specific  strategies  depend  on  the 
type  of  text,  surveying  involves  making  a 
quick  check  of  the  relevant  extra-text  catego-
ries: 
1.  Reference  Data  –  e.g.,  title,  author, 
copyright  date,  blurb,  table  of  contents,  chap-
ter or article summaries, subheadings, etc. 
2.  Graphical  Data  –  diagrams,  illustra-
tions, tables, maps. 
3. Typographical Data – all features that 
help  information  stand  out,  including  type-
faces,  spacing,  enumeration,  underlining,  in-
dentation, etc. 
In  addition,  surveying  can  utilize  skim-
ming  techniques  such  as  reading  topic  sen-
tences and final paragraphs. The goal is to dis-
cover  how the text  is organized and  what it is 
about. 
Like  most  of  approaches  to  extensive 
strategies,  the  actual  reading  exercises  should 
involve  time  limits.  In  addition,  students 
should at first work on text below their ability 
level to give them the confidence to skip large 
chunks of text or develop the skills to pick out 
main points. 
1.  Predicting  content  from  titles  (often 
tricky) and tables of contents. 
2. Matching texts  with the correct sum-
maries or diagrams. 
3. Predicting which chapters contain an-
swers  to  given  questions,  based  on  chapter 
titles. 
4.  Deciding  which  article  can  best  an-
swer  a  given  question  based  on  a  choice  of 
article summaries. 
5.  Deciding  which  books  on  a  reading 
list  would  be  most  relevant  for  a  particular 
researched essay topic. 
Efficient  readers  unreflectively  skim 
most  of  what they read to some  extent. Skim-
ming is a more text-oriented form of surveying 
and refers to the method of glancing through a 
text  to  extract  the  gist  or  main  points.  Gener-
ally  speaking,  about  75%  of  the  text  is  disre-
garded.  This  is  a  valuable  technique  for  re-
viewing  material  or  determining  whether  it  is 
relevant for more detailed investigation. 
Skimming  involves  knowing  which 
parts  of  a  text  contain  the  most  important  in-
formation  and  reading  only  those.  More  than 
most  kinds  of  reading,  therefore,  it  requires 

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
199 
knowledge  of text structure. In particular, stu-
dents should be able to learn something of the 
text  topic  from  the  title  and  any  subheadings; 
they  should  know  that  the  first  and  last  para-
graphs  often  contain  valuable  background, 
summarizing  or  concluding  information;  they 
should  be  aware  of  the  importance  of  topic 
sentences and where to find them. Eventually, 
students  can  be  introduced  to  the  different 
functions  of  paragraphs  (such  as  narrative, 
descriptive,  defining,  explanatory,  etc.)  in  or-
der to more effectively sense the pattern of the 
text and to recognize the relationship between 
main ideas and  other information from  lexical 
and grammatical indicators. 
1.  Ask  students  to  find  the  misplaced 
sentences  in  a  paragraph.  This  develops 
awareness  of  topic  sentences  and  paragraph 
coherence. 
2. Further practice can  entail the recon-
struction  of  paragraphs  from  component  sen-
tences. 
3.  Provide  several  newspaper  or  maga-
zine articles  on the same subject, and ask stu-
dents which ones deal with a particular aspect 
of the topic. 
4. Have students match a short text with 
a headline or picture. 
5.  Ask  students  to  give  titles  to  short 
texts. 
6. Have students fit topic sentences with 
particular paragraphs. 
7.  Provide  texts  with  an  increasing 
number  of  words  removed  to  give  confidence 
in selective reading. 
Scanning  is  a  rapid  search  for  specific 
information  rather  than  general  impression. 
Scanning  demands  that  the  reader  ignore  all 
but the key item being searched for. It is a use-
ful  skill  for  data  gathering,  review,  using  ref-
erence  books,  or  judging  whether  a  text  con-
tains material deserving further study. 
Although  an  easier  strategy  to  master 
than  skimming,  many  students  do  not  scan 
efficiently,  randomly  searching  and  allowing 
their attention to be caught by incidental mate-
rial.  The  reader  must  therefore,  more  than  in 
other types of reading, fix the reading purpose 
clearly, perhaps formulating specific questions 
before  systematically  dealing  with  the  text. 
Having  a  clearly  defined  purpose  means  that 
the reader can anticipate  where to find the  in-
formation and what form it will take, allowing 
rapid eye movements down the page searching 
for particular sections  or clues, such as  digits, 
common  names,  discourse  markers,  and  vari-
ous  signal  words  and  phrases  that  assist  pat-
tern recognition and anticipation. 
Scanning  exercises  are  familiar  to  all 
teachers  and  are  easy  to  produce.  As  the  es-
sence  of  scanning  is  fast  retrieval  of  specific 
information,  exercises  can  be  timed  and  com-
petitively managed. 
1.  The  student  races  to  locate  a  single 
item such as a word, date, or name  in the text 
(e.g., indexes, dictionaries, or pages from tele-
phone directories). Columnar material is easier 
to start with, as readers can be taught to sweep 
down  the  middle  of  columns  in  one  eye 
movement. 
2.  The  student  races  to  locate  specific 
phrases or facts in a text. 
3.  The  student  uses  key  words  in  ques-
tions to search for indirect answers. 
4.  The  student  matches  adjoining  sen-
tences,  using  supplied  markers  expressing  re-
lationships and logical patterns. 
5.  The  student  fills  in  missing  link 
words  from  a  text  or  reconstructs  paragraphs 
from  sentences  to  help  rhetorical  pattern  rec-
ognition. 
While  not  strictly  an  extensive-reading 
strategy,  phrase  reading  utilizes  what  are  es-
sentially  advanced  scanning  skills  and  is  a 
valuable reading strategy. 
The two keys to proficient scanning and 
phrase reading are concentration and eye-span 
ability. Actual reading is done during the brief 
moment  when  the  eyes  fixate,  or  pause,  as 
they  travel  across  the  page.  The  efficient 
reader  is  therefore  one  who  makes  few  eye 
movements,  comprehending  several  words  at 
once by grouping a text into sense units. With 
regular  practice  the  mind  can  be  conditioned 
to  both  accept  more  material  at  each  fixation 
and react  more  quickly to the  meaning  it con-
veys. 
Such  fixations  are,  however,  automati-
cally governed by the reader’s comprehension, 
and  the  foreign-language  learner  is  handi-
capped  by  a  relative  lack  of  proficiency  in 
phrase  recognition.  More  than  physical  eye 
movements,  therefore,  a  certain  amount  of 
linguistic  expertise  is  required,  and  students 
should  be  taught  to  recognize  sense  units  be-
fore  building  their  peripheral  vision  control. 

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
200 
This  involves  helping  students  see  that  ideas 
are  expressed  in  groups  rather  than  single 
words  and  that  some  words  are  commonly 
associated.  Students  should  therefore  practice 
dividing paragraphs into meaningful groups of 
two  or  three  words  in  order  to  develop  their 
recognition of sense groups. Later they can be 
presented  with  texts  in  columns  of  phrases  to 
increase  their  eye  span.  Eventually,  students 
come  to  see  that  phrase  reading  not  only  in-
creases reading speed over reading a word at a 
time, but also actually aids comprehension. 
1. Encourage students to cover previous 
lines  to  reduce  regression,  i.e.,  rereading  by 
backward eye movements. 
2. Get students to read down the middle 
of  a  column  of  figures,  slowly  increasing  the 
number of digits in each line to six. 
3. Do the same with letters, then words, 
building  up  to  phrases.  The  point  is  for  them 
to read by moving their eyes straight down the 
column, taking in each phrase in a single fixa-
tion. 
4. Ask students to make and use a mask 
that reveals only two  or three  words in a  line, 
gradually increasing eye span. 
5. Provide a ‘pyramid’ text of gradually 
increasing  width.  This  should  be  used  with  a 
card containing a centrally placed arrow point-
ing to the edge as a means of focusing the eyes 
on a fixed point while reading [4; p.61]. 
6.  Instruct  students  to  identify  phrases 
in a paragraph using slash marks, then to con-
centrate  on  these  groups  when  reading  the 
text. 
7. In addition, recent interest in describ-
ing  the  rhetorical  structure  of  different  text 
types  or genres  is  directly relevant to  improv-
ing  extensive  reading  strategies.  Effective 
comprehension depends on the reader’s ability 
to  relate  what  is  being  read  to  a  familiar  pat-
tern or schema. By enabling the reader to cor-
rectly identify and organize information into a 
conventional frame, knowledge of genres pro-
vides  a  kind  of  structural  map  that  assists  the 
rapid appraisal of a text and thereby  increases 
skimming,  scanning,  and  phrase-reading  abil-
ity [5; p. 12]. 
Students  can  start  with  examining  the 
types  of  texts  they  deal  with,  recognizing  the 
ways  that  material  is  commonly  shaped  and 
organized  in those texts. With this  knowledge 
of  how  content  in  particular  text  types  are  ar-
ranged in familiar stages, the student is able to 
anticipate  and  predict  more  accurately.  This 
allows  faster  and  more  selective  reading  for  a 
general  overview  or  to  find  specific  informa-
tion. 
 
REFERENCES 
1.  Alderson,  J.C.  Testing  reading  comprehen-
sion  skills.  Paper  presented  at  TESOL  '88 
Convention, Chicago, 1989. 
2.  Fry  T.  Embracing  Contraries:  Explorations 
in  Learning  and  Teaching.  New  York:  Ox-
ford University Press, 1963. – p. 12-19. 
3.  Harmer  Jeremy.  How  to  Teach  English. 
Addison  Wesley:  Longman,  1998.  –  p.  73-
90. 
4.  Jordan  R.R.  English  for  Academic  Pur-
poses. A guide and resource book for teach-
ers. Cambridge University Press, 1997. – p. 
58-86.   
5.  Омарова  Г.Ж.,  Токтабаева  Г.Р.  Чтение 
как один из видов речевой деятельности. 
ИЯШ. 2007. № 3. с. 12-16. 
 
 
 
УДК 811.111 
DEVELOPING LISTENING SKILLS THROUGH LISTENING STRATEGIES 
Yurina O. 
 
It is not uncommon that language learn-
ing  depends  on  listening. Listening is the lan-
guage skill that is used most often in everyday 
communication. O’Malley informs us that “we 
listen  twice  as  much  as  we  speak,  four  times 
as much as we read, and five times as much as 
we write” [3, 16]. Furthermore, listening com-
prehension  is  the  foundation  upon  which  the 
other language skills are acquired. 
Listening  provides  the  aural  input  that 
serves  as  the  basis  for  language  acquisition 
and  enables  learners  to  interact  in  spoken 
communication. 
Thus,  listening  comprehension  not  only 

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
201 
plays a crucial role in first language communi-
cation,  but  it  is  also  “at  the  heart  of  second 
language learning” [3, 20]. Teacher’s task is to 
inform and show students how they can adjust 
their  listening  behavior  to  deal  with  a  variety 
of situations, types of input, and listening pur-
poses. They help students develop a set of lis-
tening strategies and  match appropriate strate-
gies to every listening situation.  
Unfortunately,  this  essential  language 
skill  has  often  been  neglected  in  the  language 
classroom.  Teachers  sometimes  assume  that 
students  are  developing  their  listening  skills 
just  because  they  are  listening  to  the  teachers 
use  the  target  language.  Yet  listening  is  a 
complex  process  that  requires  phonological, 
semantic, syntactical, discourse, and pragmatic 
knowledge  of  the  language  as  well  as  under-
standing  of  the  context  and  of  nonverbal 
communication.  Learners  then  have  to  apply 
this  knowledge  in  a  range  of  contexts,  both 
unidirectional (e.g., lectures, radio broadcasts) 
and  bidirectional  (e.g.,  classroom  discussions, 
conversations)  listening  situations,  and  while 
using  a  variety  of  technologies  (e.g.,  tele-
phones,  computers,  digital  audio  players)  [2, 
14]. Taking  into  consideration  the  complexity 
of the listening comprehension process and the 
contexts  in  which  it  occurs,  it  cannot  be  sup-
posed  that  a  learner’s  listening  skill  will  de-
velop  on  its  own.  Teachers  must  make  con-
scious  and  systematic  efforts  to  develop  this 
skill in learners.  
Listening skills are usually  divided into 
two groups: bottom-up listening skills and top-
down listening skills. 
Bottom-up  listening  skills  refer  to  the 
decoding  process,  the  direct  decoding  of  lan-
guage  into  meaningful  units,  from  sound 
waves through the air, in through our ears and 
into  our  brain  where  meaning  is  decoded.  To 
do it students need to know the code. How the 
sounds work and how they string together and 
how  the  codes  can  change  in  different  ways 
when they are strung together. In  other  words 
bottom-up  decoding  shows  how  meaning 
moves  from  recognition  of  individual  sounds 
to  recognition  of  the  meaning  of  whole  utter-
ances.  It  is  not  uncommon  that  most  students 
have  never  been  taught  how  English  changes 
when  it  is  strung  together  in  sentences.  The 
example of bottom-up skills:  
- Recognizing individual phonemes; 
-  Recognizing  phoneme  sequences 
which form words; 
- Recognizing word boundaries; 
- Recognizing stressed syllables; 
- Recognizing intonation patterns; 
-  Recognizing  syllable  reduction  due  to 
weak forms and/or elision; 
- Recognizing catenation; 
- Recognizing assimilation. 
It is obvious that they tend to be phono-
logical,  and  that  is  why  teacher’s  goal  is  in 
focusing  systematically  on  phonology  during 
the course for students to better teach bottom-
up processing skills.  
Top-down  skills  or  processing  refers  to 
how  we  use  our  world  knowledge  to  attribute 
meaning  to  language  input;  how  our  knowl-
edge  of social convention  helps us understand 
meaning.  These  are  the  skills  that  listening 
teachers  should  be  teaching  in  their  classes. 
Richards stated: "An understanding of the role 
of  bottom-up  and  top-down  processes  in  lis-
tening  is  central  to  any  theory  of  listening 
comprehension" [4:50].  Top down processing 
refers  to  the  attribution  of  meaning,  drawn 
from one's own world knowledge, to language 
input. It involves "the listener's ability to bring 
prior information to bear on the task of under-
standing the "heard" language" [3, 52].   
Brown proposes the following top-down 
skills:  
• discriminating between emotions 
• getting the gist 
• recognizing the topic 
•  using  discourse  structure  to  enhance 
listening strategies 
• identifying the speaker 
• evaluating themes 
• finding the main idea 
• finding supporting details 
• making inferences 
• understanding organizing principals of 
extended speech  
There  are  a  great  number  of  sub-skills, 
which  construct  the  overall  skill  of  listening. 
Sometimes  the  ‘bottom-up’  skills  are  called 
‘micro’  skills  [2,  78].  O’Malley  proposed  his 
own  (subjective)  checklist  of  sub-skills  in-
volved  in  listening,  which  shows  the  wide 
range  of  possible  skills  [3,  70].  He  distin-
guishes  the  following  skills:  perception  skills 
(recognizing individual sounds, discriminating 
between  sounds,  identifying  reduced  forms  in 
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   53




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет