Вестник Казахстанско-Американского



жүктеу 5.1 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
бет37/53
Дата25.04.2017
өлшемі5.1 Kb.
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   53

BIBLIOGRAPHY 
1.  Daniels,  Harvey.  Literature  Circle:  Voice 
and  Choice  in  Book  Clubs  and  Reading 
Groups.  Portland:  Sten  house  Publishers, 
2002. Print. 
2. Hudson, Thom. Teaching Second Language 
Reading.  Oxford:  Oxford  University  Press, 
2007. Print. 
3.  Hadley,  Alice  Omaggio.  Teaching  Lan-

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
192 
guage  in  Context.  Boston:  Heiley&  Heiley, 
2001. Print. 
4.  “Intensive  Reading.”  Teaching  English. 
British Council. Web. 1 March. 2012. 
5.  “Extensive  Reading.”  Teaching  English. 
British Council. Web. 1 March. 2012. 
 
 
 
УДК (075.8) 
BASICS OF LEARNING ENGLISH FOR OCCUPATIONAL PURPOSES 
Kameneva N. 
 
It  is  well  known  that  the  English  lan-
guage  is  a  very  popular  language  nowadays. 
Every day many people start to study English. 
More  and  more  people  want  to  communicate 
in this language. It is quite understandable-our 
world is changing, life requires new demands. 
To  be  successful  we  have  to  be  communica-
tive  person.  To  get  great  opportunities  we  are 
to  follow  these  demands.  And  one  of  these 
demands is learning English. 
The  history  of  the  English  language 
really  started  with  the  arrival  of  three  Ger-
manic  tribes  who  invaded  Britain  during  the 
5th  century  AD.  These  tribes,  the  Angles,  the 
Saxons  and  the  Jutes,  crossed  the  North  Sea 
from  what  today  is  Denmark  and  northern 
Germany. At that time, the inhabitants of Brit-
ain  spoke  a  Celtic  language.  But  most  of  the 
Celtic speakers were pushed west and north by 
the  invaders  -  what  is  now  Wales,  Scotland 
and  Ireland.  The  Angles  came  from  England 
and  their  language  was  called  Englisc  -  from 
which  the  words  England  and  English  are  de-
rived [1]. We can  distinguish some periods  of 
English  language  development:  Old  English 
(450-1100  AD),  Middle  English  (1100-1500), 
Modern English (Early Modern English 1500-
1800)  and  (Late  Modern  English  1800-
Present)  [1].  The  main  difference  between 
Early  Modern  English  and  Late  Modern  Eng-
lish  is  vocabulary.  Late  Modern  English  has 
words,  arising  from  two  principal  factors: 
firstly,  the  Industrial  Revolution  and  technol-
ogy  created  a  need  for  new  words;  secondly. 
Therefore  we  can  see  the  long  process  of  its 
development.  So  many  changes,  so  many  dis-
coveries  can  be  described  during  these  peri-
ods. Within its development, the word-stock is 
enriched  by  a  great  number  of  words,  which 
can be used in different spheres of our life. For 
example  in  industry,  we  have  its  own  terms 
and phrases. Sometimes it is seems difficult to 
remember these  words but for professionals it 
is quite easy to do.  
Now  we  want  you to  know about some 
smart  points,  which  are  in  the  Address  of  the 
President  of  Kazakhstan,  Nursultan  Nazar-
bayev,  to  the  People  of  Kazakhstan,  January 
28, 2011: “I have always said that  knowledge 
of  three  languages  is  an  obligatory  condition 
of  one’s  wellbeing.  Therefore,  I  believe  that 
by  2020  a  share  of  our  population  speaking 
English should be no less than 20 percent” [2]. 
So on the basis of the President’s address peo-
ple should tend to learn languages for the sake 
of  our  feature.  People  should  understand  the 
importance  of  knowledge  and  its  power.  Lan-
guage can provide us with a high style of life, 
good  mental  abilities  with  an  opportunity  to 
communicate with people of different cultures. 
In  schools  and  in  Universities  children 
and  students  learn  English  and  it  is  their  first 
step  to  language  learning.  But  the  problem  is 
that this process  is a  very  generic. People  can 
touch  only  the  surface  of  a  huge  “sea”  of 
words,  phrases  and  terms.  Having  finished  a 
university  students  possess  only  some  general 
understanding of the language. They find jobs 
concerning  their  profession  (for  example  an 
interpreter)  and  their  first  working  day  is  aw-
ful!  Why  it  happens  -  it  is  easy  to  guess  for 
you.  Our  universities  can  give  a  general  lan-
guage program. Those  who  work hard and try 
to  remember  everything  explained  at  the  Uni-
versity,  nevertheless  usually  fail  their  first 
“week” of the job.  
Well, it can be a real and a serious prob-
lem  which can be  faced by all the students  of 
language  departments.  Exactly  after  finishing 
University  young  people  do  not  know  how  to 
improve  the  situation.  They  think  they  know 
everything but it is not like it seems.  
We can say that the problem of our edu-
cational -is a short time and a huge volume of 

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
193 
information.  Students  must  for  a  short  period 
of  time  become  good  professionals,  but  it  is 
impossible, unfortunately.  
One  of  the  ways  to  improve  the  situa-
tion  is  learning  English  for  occupational  pur-
poses. We shall try to explain this idea.  
From the  early 1960's, English  for Spe-
cific  Purposes  (ESP)  became  one  of  the  most 
prominent areas of EFL (English as a Foreign 
Language)  teaching  today.  Its  development  is 
reflected in the increasing number of universi-
ties offering an MA in ESP and in the number 
of  ESP  courses  offered  to  foreign  students  in 
English  speaking  countries.  In  Japan  too,  the 
ESP movement  has shown a slow but definite 
growth  over  the  past  few  years.  Especially, 
increased  interest  has  been  spurred  as  a result 
of the Mombusho's decision in 1994 to largely 
hand over control of university curriculums to 
the  universities  themselves.  This  has  led  to  a 
quick growth in English courses aimed at spe-
cific  disciplines,  e.g.  English  for  Doctors,  in 
place of the  more traditional 'General English' 
courses. Finally, on November 8th in 1996 the 
ESP  community  came  together  as  a  whole  at 
the first Japan Conference on English for Spe-
cific  Purposes,  held  on  the  campus  of  Aizu 
University, Fukushima Prefecture [3].  
A  very  heated  debate  took  place  on  the 
TESP-L  e-mail  discussion  list  about  whether 
or  not  English  for  Academic  Purposes  (EAP) 
could be considered part of ESP in general. At 
the  Japan  Conference  on  ESP  also,  clear  dif-
ferences  in  how  people  interpreted  the  mean-
ing  of  ESP  could  be  seen.  Some  people  de-
scribed  ESP  as  simply  being  the  teaching  of 
English  for  any  purpose  that  could  be  speci-
fied. Others describe it as the teaching of Eng-
lish  used  in  academic  studies  or  the  teaching 
of  English  for  vocational  or  professional  pur-
poses. At the conference, guests were honored 
to  have  as  the  main  speaker,  Tony  Dudley-
Evans, co-editor of the ESP Journal mentioned 
above.  Very  aware  of  the  current  confusion 
amongst  the  ESP  community  in  Japan,  Dud-
ley-Evans  set  out  in  his  report  to  clarify  the 
meaning of ESP, giving an extended definition 
of  ESP  in  terms  of  'absolute'  and  'variable' 
characteristics (see below) .  
Let  us  see  the  Definition  of  ESP  (Dud-
ley-Evans, 1997) [4]:  
Absolute Characteristics: 
1. ESP is defined to meet specific needs 
of the learners. 
2.  ESP  makes  use  of  underlying  meth-
odology  and  activities  of  the  discipline  it 
serves. 
3.  ESP  concentrates  on  the  language 
appropriate  to  these  activities  in  terms  of 
grammar,  study  skills,  lexis,  discourse  and 
genre.  
Variable Characteristics: 
1. ESP may be related to or designed for 
specific disciplines. 
2.  ESP  may  use,  in  specific  teaching 
situations,  a  different  methodology  from  that 
of General English. 
3. ESP is likely to be designed for adult 
learners, either at a tertiary level institution  or 
in a professional work situation. It could be for 
learners at secondary school level. 
4.  ESP  is  generally  designed  for  inter-
mediate or advanced students.  
5. Most ESP courses assume some basic 
knowledge of the language systems. 
The  definition  Dudley-Evans  offers  is 
clearly  influenced  by  that  of  Strevens  (1988) 
[5],  although  he  has  improved  it  substantially 
by  removing  the  absolute  characteristic  that 
ESP  is  "in  contrast  with  'General  English'" 
(Johns  et  al.,  1991:  298),  and  has  included 
more  variable  characteristics.  The  division  of 
ESP into absolute and variable characteristics, 
in  particular,  is  very  helpful  in  resolving  ar-
guments  about  what  is  and  is  not  ESP.  From 
the  definition,  we  can  see  that  ESP  can  but  is 
not  necessarily  concerned  with  a  specific  dis-
cipline,  nor  does  it  have to be aimed at a cer-
tain age group or ability range. ESP should be 
seen  simple  as  an  'approach'  to  teaching,  or 
what Dudley-Evans describes as an 'attitude of 
mind'.  This  is  a  similar  conclusion  to  that 
made  by  Hutchinson  et  al.  (1987:19)  who 
state,  "ESP  is  an  approach  to  language  teach-
ing  in  which  all  decisions  as  to  content  and 
method  are  based  on  the  learner's  reason  for 
learning"[6].  If  we  agree  with  this  definition, 
we  begin  to  see  how  broad  ESP  really  is.  In 
actual  fact,  one  may  ask  'What  is  the  differ-
ence  between  the  ESP  and  General  English 
approach?' Hutchinson (1987:53) answers this 
quite  simply,  "in  theory  nothing,  in  practice  a 
great  deal"  [6].  When  their  book  was  written, 
of course, the last statement was quite true. At 
the time, teachers of General English courses, 
while  acknowledging  that  students  had  a  spe-

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
194 
cific  purpose  for  studying  English,  would 
rarely  conduct  a  needs  analysis  to  find  out 
what  was  necessary  to  actually  achieve  it. 
Teachers  nowadays,  however,  are  much  more 
aware of the importance of needs analysis, and 
certainly materials writers think very carefully 
about the goals of learners at all stages of ma-
terials  production.  Perhaps  this  reflects  the 
influence  that  the  ESP  approach  has  had  on 
English  teaching  in  general.  Clearly  the  line 
between  where  General  English  courses  stop 
and ESP courses start has become  very vague 
indeed. Rather ironically, while many General 
English  teachers  can  be  described  as  using  an 
ESP approach, basing their syllabi on a learner 
needs analysis and their own specialist knowl-
edge of using English for real communication, 
it is the majority of so-called ESP teachers that 
are  using  an  approach  furthest  from  that  de-
scribed  above.  Instead  of  conducting  inter-
views  with  specialists  in  the  field,  analyzing 
the language that is required in the profession, 
or  even  conducting  students'  needs  analysis, 
many ESP teachers have become slaves of the 
published  textbooks  available,  unable  to 
evaluate  their  suitability  based  on  personal 
experience,  and  unwilling  to  do  the  necessary 
analysis  of  difficult  specialist  texts  to  verify 
their contents.  
So  now  it  is  necessary  to  return  to  the 
Kazakhstan  President’s  Address  regarding 
development  of  the  country.  The  main  aim  of 
Kazakhstan is to become a developed country. 
To  reach  this  goal  it  is  necessary  to  involve 
foreign investors to this process. As we know, 
Kazakhstan  is  a  leading  country  in  the  sphere 
of  industry.  Our  President  involves  foreign 
specialists  to  improve  and  to  develop  indus-
trial production. On the assumption of this we 
need  more  skilled  specialists  (for  example  in-
terpreters)  to  provide  opportunities  for  clear 
communication  and  understanding  between 
representatives  of  different  cultures.  For  in-
stance,  Kazakhstan’s  specialists  who  were 
taught by the foreigners (Germans, Americans 
etc.)  during  starting  of  copper  plant,  “New 
Metallurgy project” (I  worked that time at the 
construction site as an interpreter), was carried 
out by  means  of professional  interpreters who 
were  aware  in  the  sphere  of  metallurgy.  It 
helped  to  avoid  misunderstanding  between 
metallurgists. 
Therefore,  we  can  say  that  we  need 
more  language  specialists  skilled  in  a  certain 
sphere  of  production.  Educational  program  at 
the  Universities  should  be  oriented  towards 
needs  of  the  regions.  Including  demands  of 
East  Kazakhstan  Oblast,  we  need  more  lan-
guage skilled interpreters in the sphere of non-
ferrous metallurgy. 
The  most  important  difference  lies  in 
the  learners  and  their  purposes  for  learning 
English. One can add to it by saying that ESP 
concentrates more on language in context than 
on teaching  grammar and  language structures. 
It  covers  subjects  varying  from  accounting  or 
computer  science  to  tourism  and  business 
management.  In  some  cases,  people  with  in-
adequate  proficiency  in  English  need  to  be 
taught  to  handle  specific  jobs.  In  such  cases 
English  is  taught  for  specific  purposes so that 
the  concerned  employees  can  perform  their 
job requirements efficiently. 
However, English for Specific Purposes 
(ESP)  has  a  wide  scope  and  superimposes 
other  nomenclatures  such  as  EOP  and  EAP. 
An  article  on  ESP  available  on  the  Internet 
says:  ESP  (English  for  Specific  Purposes) 
course  aims  are  determined  by  the  needs  of  a 
specific  group  of  learners.  ESP  is  often  di-
vided  into  EAP  (English  for  Academic  Pur-
poses)  and  EOP  (English  for  Occupational 
Purposes).  Further  sub-divisions  of  EOP  are 
sometimes  made  into  business  English,  pro-
fessional  English  (e.g.  English  for  doctors, 
lawyers) and vocational English [7] (e.g. Eng-
lish for tourism, aviation). 
In  conclusion,  we  can  say  that  English 
words  have  various  meanings,  depending  on 
the  context  where  they’re  used.  English  for 
occupational  purposes  identifies  that  problem 
and teaches the appropriate use of the word for 
a  specific  occupation  or  industry.  English  for 
Occupation Purposes courses narrow down the 
broad  definitions  of  word  usage  to  those  nec-
essary  for  the  industry.  By  doing  this,  it  cuts 
the  time  necessary  to  learn  the  language  nec-
essary for the job.  
Generally,  courses  of  English  for  occu-
pation  purposes  are  developed  to  give  partici-
pants sufficient  input and practice  in basic re-
port writing so that they  would be able to un-
dertake  and  perform  similar  tasks  effectively 
in  their  workplace.  Special  attention  is  given 
to  the  steps  involved  in  the  preparation  of  a 
job. 

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
195 
When  a  company  operating  in  English 
employs  professionals  for  whom  English  is  a 
second  language,  the  company  is  obliged  to 
provide  language  training  for  its  employees. 
Otherwise,  many  of  its  labor,  some  in  main 
posts,  may  be  handicapped  by  poor  speaking 
or  writing  skill.  However,  the  company  is  not 
interested  in  its  employees  achieving  fluency 
or  advanced  level,  though  this  can  be  desir-
able. The main concern of the company is that 
communication  for  the  purposes  of  job  per-
formance is effective.  
Some examples: a switchboard operator 
who  is  fluent  in  spoken  English  is,  of  course, 
ideal  for  this  post.  However,  a  non-native 
speaker  with  such  level  of  English  would  not 
accept the job of a switchboard operator. Most 
probably,  the  job  will  attract  some  school 
leavers with some spoken language. However, 
they  need  to  attend  language  classes  before 
they start the  job. The training  need  here  is to 
develop  the  listening  and  speaking  skills  that 
will  enable  them  to  answer  the  phone,  offer 
help,  connect  the  caller  or  say  why  he  cannot 
and  offer  to  take  a  message.  These  are  the 
minimum  requirements  of  the  job.  In  a  three-
week training course the operators will be able 
to  do  this.  Yet  they  will  frustrate  when  some 
callers use unfamiliar expressions and vocabu-
lary.  
In  other  words,  the  company  is  respon-
sible  for  training  the  employees  to  do  their 
jobs  -  not  to  read  English  newspapers  and 
write  articles  there.  This  nature  of  the  type  of 
language  skills  required  in  the  different  jobs 
make  'English  for  Occupational  Purposes' 
training. An  engineer  who  is required to  write 
'Technical  Reports'  can  develop  the  skill  for 
example  by  attending  a  six-week  part-time 
course.  However,  he  may  find  it  difficult  to 
socialize  with  native  speakers  in  the  social 
events of the company. Nevertheless, unless it 
is part of his  job to receive and  entertain visi-
tors, the company is not interested in develop-
ing his language skills in this area.  
Any  training  including  language  train-
ing should be based on an accurate process of 
identifying  training  needs  and  should  be  de-
signed  and  implemented  by  a  language  spe-
cialist  well  informed  in  ESP/EOP  and  lan-
guage training [8]. 
 
REFERENCES 
1. Robert Mc Crum, William Cran, and Robert 
Mac  Neil.  The  story  of  English.  Published 
in Penguin Books., 1993.-394 p. 
2.  Address  of  the  President  of  Kazakhstan, 
Nursultan Nazarbayev, to the People of Ka-
zakhstan, January 28, 2011. 
3.  Laurence  Anthony.  English  for  Specific 
Purposes. What does it mean? Why is it dif-
ferent? Okayama University of Science. 
4. Dudley-Evans, Tony (1998). Developments 
in  English  for  Specific  Purposes:  A  multi-
disciplinary  approach.  Cambridge  Univer-
sity Press. (Forthcoming). 
5. Strevens, P. (1988). ESP after twenty years: 
A  re-appraisal.  In  M.  Tickoo  (Ed.),  ESP: 
State  of  the  art  (1-13).  SEAMEO  Regional 
Language Centre. 
6.  Hutchinson,  Tom  &  Waters,  Alan  (1987). 
English  for  Specific  Purposes:  A  learner-
centered  approach.  Cambridge  University 
Press. 
7. Rahman, T. (2000). Language Ideology and 
Power. Karachi: Oxford University Press. 
8.  WebSources:http://hussain1944.  xomba. 
com/ 
 
 
 
УДК (075.8) 
PURPOSE AND STRATEGY: TEACHING INTENSIVE AND EXTENSIVE 
READING 
Amirgazina A.B. 
 
Reading  has  traditionally  been  divided 
into  two  types:  intensive  and  extensive.  In 
broad  terms,  intensive  reading  may  be  de-
scribed  as  the  practice  of  particular  reading 
skills  and  the  close  linguistic  study  of  text. 
Extensive  reading,  on  the  other  hand,  can  be 
defined  as  reading  a  large  quantity  of  text, 
where reading confidence and reading fluency 
are  prioritized.  Although  this  twin  categoriza-
tion  of  reading  into  two  basic  types  can  be 

МЕТОДИКА ОБУЧЕНИЯ ГОВОРЕНИЮ И АУДИРОВАНИЮ 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
196 
found  in  many  teacher  resource  books  for  the 
teaching of English as a foreign language, it is 
not  the  whole  story,  as  the  student's  learning 
history clearly pointed out. We need to extend 
the  categorization.  We  can  do  this  by  adding, 
first,  oral  reading,  or  reading  aloud  in  class, 
where  considerable  focus  is  put  on  correct 
pronunciation  of  the  text  -  and,  second,  text 
translation,  where  correct  translation  of  the 
foreign language text into the learners' mother 
tongue is emphasized in tandem with the study 
of an array of grammatical, lexical and phono-
logical  points.  This  creates  a  four-way  meth-
odological  categorization  of  reading  in  a  for-
eign  language,  summarized  in  the  following 
table [1; p.34]. 
 
Table 1. Basic Classroom Approaches to Reading in a foreign language 
Methodological choice 
Classroom focus 
Extensive 
Students read a lot of text 
Intensive 
Students practice particular reading skill 
Oral reading 
Students listen and read aloud 
Text translation 
Students translate from L2 to L1 
 
The  Intensive  Reading  Technique  is 
reading  for  a  high  degree  of  comprehension 
and retention over a long period of time. It is a 
study  technique  for  organizing  readings  that 
will  have  to  be  understood  and  remembered. 
One  may  have  good  comprehension  while 
reading  line-by-line,  but  REMEMBERING  is 
what counts. Intensive reading is not a careful, 
single reading, but is a method based on a va-
riety  of  techniques  like  scanning,  the  survey-
ing  technique  of  planning  your  purpose,  and 
others. 
Overview,  purpose,  questions,  reading, 
summarize,  test,  and  understanding  are  the 
seven  procedures  that  cover  the  method,  for 
very effective reading for detailed comprehen-
sion and long retention. 
Some  of  the  main  strategies,  skills  and 
sub-skills  utilized  in  extensive  reading  are  as 
follows: 
- prediction; 
-  skimming  (reading  quickly  for  the 
main idea or gist); 
-  scanning  (reading  quickly  for  a  spe-
cific piece of information). 
Distinguishing between: 
a) factual and non-factual information; 
b) important and less important items; 
c) relevant and irrelevant information; 
d) explicit and implicit information; 
e) ideas and examples and opinions: 
- drawing inferences and conclusions; 
- deducting unknown words; 
-  understanding  text  organization  and 
linguistic/semantic aspects, e.g.; 
a) relationships between and within sen-
tences (e.g. cohesion) 
b)  recognizing  discourse  /  semantic 
markers and their function. 
Students need to be able to do a number 
of things  with a reading text. They  need to be 
able  to  scan  the  text  tor  particular  bits  of  in-
formation  they  are  searching  for.  This  skill 
means  that  they  do  not  have  to  read  every 
word  and  line;  on  the  contrary,  such  an  ap-
proach  would  stop  them  scanning  success-
fully. 
Students need to be able to skim a text - 
as if they  were casting their  eyes  over  its sur-
face - to get a general idea of what it is about. 
Just  as  with  scanning,  if  they  try  to  gather  all 
the  details  at  this  stage,  they  will  get  bogged 
down  and  may  not  be  able  to  get  the  general 
idea  because  they  are  concentrating  too  hard 
on specifics. 
Whether  readers  scan  or  skim  depends 
on what kind of text they are reading and what 
they  want  to  get  out  of  it.  They  may  scan  a 
computer  manual  to  find  the  one  piece  of  in-
formation they  need to use their machine, and 
they  may  skim  a  newspaper  article  to  get  a 
general  idea  of  what  has been  happening. But 
we  would  expect  them  to  be  less  utilitarian 
with  a  literary  work  where  reading  for  pleas-
ure will be a slower, closer kind of activity. 
Reading  for  detailed  comprehension, 
whether  looking  for  detailed  information  or 
language,  must  be  seen  by  students  as  some-
thing  very  different  from  the  reading  skills 
mentioned  above.  When  looking  for  details, 
we expect students to concentrate on the minu-
tiae of what they are reading. 
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   53




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет