Вестник Казахстанско-Американского



жүктеу 5.1 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
бет18/53
Дата25.04.2017
өлшемі5.1 Kb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   53

ЛИТЕРАТУРА 
1. 
Государственный  общеобязательный 
стандарт образования Республики Казах-
стан.  Высшее  образование.  Бакалавриат. 
Основные 
положения. 

ГОСО 
РК5.04.019 – 2011. – Астана, 2011 
2. 
Государственный  общеобязательный 
стандарт образования Республики Казах-
стан.  Высшее  образование.  Магистрату-
ра.  Основные  положения.  -  ГОСО 
РК5.04.019 – 2011. – Астана, 2011 
3. 
Государственный  общеобязательный 
стандарт образования Республики Казах-
стан.  Высшее  образование.  Докторанту-
ра.  Основные  положения.  -  ГОСО 
РК5.04.019 – 2011. – Астана, 2011 
 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
98
4.  Закон  Республики  Казахстан  от  27  июля 
2007 года «Об образовании» 
5.  Концепции  развития  иноязычного  обра-
зования  Республики  Казахстан.  –  Алма-
ты: Казахский университет международ-
ных отношений и мировых языков имени 
Абылай хана, 2006. 
6. Общеевропейские компетенции владения 
иностранным  языкам:  Europarat.  Rat  für 
kulturelle  Zusammenarbeit:  Gemeinsamer 
europäischer Referenzrahmen für Sprachen: 
lernen,  lehren,  beurteilen.  A  Common  Eu-
ropean Framework of Reference for Langu-
ages  Learning,  Teaching,  Assessment  – 
Strassburg, 2011 
 
 
 
УДК 378.147 
NARRATIVE METHODS IN PROGRAM EVALUATION AND 
ORGANIZATION DEVELOPMENT 
Nesterenko A. 
 
As  a  future  professional,  with  master 
degree  I  am  really  interested  in  the  sphere  of 
education. In order to educate or apply knowl-
edge  to  the  minds  of  people,  the  special  pro-
gram should be created. But in this case again 
teachers  faced  with  one  more  complicated 
problem  –  program  evaluation.  Again,  pro-
gram evaluation is wildly used not only in the 
sphere  of  education.  Let  us  invide  deeper  in 
this  question. The field  of program  evaluation 
has evolved over the past half century, moving 
from  focusing  primarily  on  research  methods 
to embracing concepts such as utilization, val-
ues,  context,  change,  learning,  strategy,  poli-
tics, and  organizational  dynamics.  Along  with 
this  shift  has  come  a  broader  epistemological 
perspective  and  wider  array  of  empirical 
methods.  They  are  qualitative  and  mixed 
methods, responsive case studies, participatory 
and  empowerment  action  research,  and  inter-
pretive  and  constructivist  versions  of  knowl-
edge.  Note  that  the  concept  of  program 
evaluation can include a wide variety of meth-
ods  to  evaluate  many  aspects  of  programs  in 
nonprofit or for-profit organizations. There are 
numerous  books  and  other  materials  that  pro-
vide  in-depth  analysis  of  evaluations,  their 
designs, methods, combination of methods and 
techniques of analysis. However, personnel do 
not  have to be  experts in these topics to carry 
out  a  useful  program  evaluation.  The  "20-80" 
rule applies  here, that 20% of  effort generates 
80%  of  the  needed  results.  It's  better  to  do 
what  might turn out to be an average  effort at 
evaluation than to do no evaluation at all.  
Many  people  believe  evaluation  is  a 
useless  activity  that  generates  lots  of  boring 
data  with  useless  conclusions.  This  was  a 
problem  with  evaluations  in  the  past  when 
program  evaluation  methods  were  chosen 
largely on the basis of achieving complete sci-
entific  accuracy,  reliability  and  validity.  This 
approach  often  generated  extensive  data  from 
which  very carefully chosen conclusions  were 
drawn.  Generalizations  and  recommendations 
were  avoided.  As  a  result,  evaluation  reports 
tended  to  reiterate  the  obvious  and  left  pro-
gram  administrators  disappointed  and  skepti-
cal  about  the  value  of  evaluation  in  general. 
More  recently  (especially  as  a  result  of  Mi-
chael  Patton's  development  of  utilization-
focused evaluation), evaluation has focused on 
utility,  relevance  and  practicality  at  least  as 
much as scientific validity. 
Many  people  believe  that  evaluation  is 
about  proving  the  success  or  failure  of  a  pro-
gram.  This  myth  assumes  that  success  is  im-
plementing  the  perfect  program  and  never 
having  to  hear  from  employees,  customers  or 
clients again - the program will now run itself 
perfectly.  This  doesn't  happen  in  real  life. 
Success is remaining open to continuing feed-
back  and  adjusting  the  program  accordingly. 
Evaluation gives you this continuing feedback. 
Many believe that evaluation is a highly 
unique  and  complex  process  that  occurs  at  a 
certain  time  in  a  certain  way,  and  almost  al-
ways  includes  the  use  of  outside  experts. 
Many  people  believe  they  must  completely 
understand terms such as validity and reliabil-
ity.  They  don't  have  to.  They  do  have  to  con-
sider  what  information  they  need  in  order  to 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
99
make  current  decisions  about  program  issues 
or needs. Note that many people regularly un-
dertake  some  nature  of  program  evaluation  - 
they just don't do it in a formal fashion so they 
don't  get  the  most  out  of  their  efforts  or  they 
make  conclusions  that  are  inaccurate  (some 
evaluators would disagree that this is program 
evaluation  if  not  done  methodically).  Conse-
quently,  they  miss  precious  opportunities  to 
make  more  of  difference  for  their  customer 
and  clients,  or  to  get  a  bigger  bang  for  their 
buck. 
So What is Program Evaluation? 
First,  let  us  consider  "what  is  a  pro-
gram?"  Typically,  organizations  work  from 
their  mission  to  identify  several  overall  goals 
which  must  be  reached  to  accomplish  their 
mission. In  nonprofits, each  of these  goals of-
ten  becomes  a  program.  Nonprofit  programs 
are  organized  methods  to  provide  certain  re-
lated services to constituents, e.g., clients, cus-
tomers, patients, etc. Programs must be evalu-
ated to  decide  if the programs are indeed use-
ful to constituents. In a for-profit, a program is 
often a one-time effort to produce a new prod-
uct or line of products.  
So,  still,  what  is  program  evaluation? 
Program  evaluation  is  carefully  collecting  in-
formation about a program or some aspect of a 
program  in  order to  make  necessary decisions 
about  the  program.  Program  evaluation  can 
include any or a variety of at least 35 different 
types  of  evaluation,  such  as  for  needs  assess-
ments,  accreditation,  cost/benefit  analysis, 
effectiveness,  efficiency,  formative,  summa-
tive,  goal-based,  process,  outcomes,  etc.  The 
type  of  evaluation  you  undertake  to  improve 
your  programs  depends  on  what  you  want  to 
learn  about  the  program.  Don't  worry  about 
what type of evaluation you need or are doing- 
worry  about  what  you  need  to  know  to  make 
the  program  decisions  you  need  to  make,  and 
worry  about  how  you  can  accurately  collect 
and understand that information. 
So,  then  where  Program  Evaluation  is 
Helpful? See some frequent Reasons: 
Program evaluation can: 
1.  Understand,  verify  or  increase  the 
impact of products or services on customers or 
clients  -  These  "outcomes"  evaluations  are 
increasingly  required  by  nonprofit  funders  as 
verification  that  the  nonprofits  are  indeed 
helping  their  constituents.  Too  often,  service 
providers (for-profit or nonprofit) rely on their 
own  instincts  and  passions  to  conclude  what 
their  customers  or  clients  really  need  and 
whether the products or services are providing 
what is needed. Over time, these organizations 
find  themselves  in  a  lot  of  guessing  about 
what would be a good product or service, and 
trial and error about how new products or ser-
vices could be delivered. 
2.  Improve  delivery  mechanisms  to  be 
more  efficient  and  less  costly  -  Over  time, 
product  or  service  delivery  ends  up  to  be  an 
inefficient  collection  of  activities  that  are  less 
efficient  and  more  costly  than  need  be. 
Evaluations  can  identify  program  strengths 
and weaknesses to improve the program. 
3.  Verify  that  you're  doing  what  you 
think  you're  doing  -  Typically,  plans  about 
how to  deliver services,  end up changing sub-
stantially  as  those  plans  are  put  into  place. 
Evaluations can verify if the program is really 
running as originally planned. 
Other Reasons: 
Program evaluation can: 
4.  Facilitate  management's  really  think-
ing  about  what  their  program  is  all  about,  in-
cluding  its  goals,  how  it  meets  it  goals  and 
how it will know if it has met its goals or not. 
5. Produce data or verify results that can 
be  used  for  public  relations  and  promoting 
services in the community.  
6.  Produce  valid  comparisons  between 
programs  to  decide  which  should  be  retained, 
e.g., in the face of pending budget cuts. 
7.  Fully  examine  and  describe  effective 
programs for duplication elsewhere. 
Still,  evaluation  has remained an  essen-
tially empirical endeavor that emphasizes data 
collection  and  reporting  and  the  underlying 
skills  of  research  design,  measurement,  and 
analysis.  Related  fields,  such  as  organization 
development  (OD),  differ  from  evaluation  in 
their emphasis on skills like establishing trust-
ing  and  respectful  relationships,  communicat-
ing effectively, diagnosis, negotiation, motiva-
tion, and change dynamics. The future of pro-
gram  evaluation  should  include  graduate  edu-
cation and professional training programs that 
deliberately  blend  these  two  skill  sets  to  pro-
duce  a  new  kind  of  professional-a  scholar-
practitioner who integrates objective reflection 
based on systematic inquiry with interventions 
designed  to  improve  policies  and  programs 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
100
(McClintock, 2004).  
Narrative  methods  represent  a  form  of 
inquiry  that  has  promise  for  integrating 
evaluation  and  organization  development. 
Narrative  methods  rely  on  various  forms  of 
storytelling that, with regard to linking inquiry 
and change goals, have many important attrib-
utes: 
Storytelling  lends  itself  to  participatory 
change processes because it relies on people to 
make sense of their own experiences and envi-
ronments. 
Stories can be used to focus  on particu-
lar  interventions  while  also  reflecting  on  the 
array  of  contextual  factors  that  influence  out-
comes. 
Stories  can  be  systematically  gathered 
and  claims  verified  from  independent  sources 
or methods. 
Narrative  data  can  be  analyzed  using 
existing  conceptual  frameworks  or  assessed 
for emergent themes. 
Narrative  methods  can  be  integrated 
into ongoing organizational processes to aid in 
program  planning,  decision  making,  and  stra-
tegic management. 
The  following  sketches  describe  narra-
tive  methods  that  have  somewhat  different 
purposes  and  procedures.  They  share  a  focus 
on  formative  evaluation,  or  improving  the 
program  during  its  evaluation,  though  in  sev-
eral  instances  they  can  contribute  to  summa-
tive  assessment  of  outcomes.  For  purposes  of 
comparison,  the  methods  are  organized  into 
three  groups:  those  that  are  relatively  struc-
tured around success, those  whose themes are 
emergent, and those that are linked to a theory 
of change.  
 
Narratives Structured Around Success 
Dart  and  Davies  (2003)  propose  a 
method  they  call  the  most  significant  change 
(MSC) technique and  describe  how  it was ap-
plied to the evaluation of a large-scale agricul-
tural  extension  program  in  Australia.  This 
method  is  highly  structured  and  designed  to 
engage  all  levels  of  the  system  from  program 
clients  and  front-line  staff  to  statewide  deci-
sion makers and funders, as well as university 
and  industry  partners.  The  MSC  process  in-
volves the following steps: 
Identify domains of inquiry for storytel-
ling (e.g., changes in decision-making skills or 
farm profitability).  
Develop  a  format  for  data  collection 
(e.g.,  story  title,  what  happened,  when,  and 
why the change was considered significant). 
As  described  by  Dart  and  Davies 
(2003),  one  of  the  most  important  results  of 
MSC was that the story selection process sur-
faced  differing  values  and  desired  outcomes 
for the program. In other words, the evaluation 
storytelling  process  was  at  least  as  important 
as  the  evaluation  data  in  the  stories.  In  addi-
tion,  a  follow-up  case  study  of  MSC revealed 
that  it  had  increased  involvement  and  interest 
in  evaluation,  caused  participants  at  all  levels 
to  understand  better  the  program  outcomes 
and the  dynamics that influence them, and fa-
cilitated  strategic  planning  and  resource  allo-
cation  toward  the  most  highly  valued  direc-
tions.  This  is  a  good  illustration  of  narrative 
method  linking  inquiry  and  OD  needs.  A  re-
lated  narrative  method,  structured  to  gather 
stories  about  both  positive  and  negative  out-
comes,  is  called  the  success  case  method 
(Brinkerhoff,  2003  ).  The  method  has  been 
most frequently used to  evaluate staff training 
and  related  human  resource  programs,  al-
though  conceptually  it  could  be  applied  to 
other programs as well. 
The purpose of the success case method 
is not just to evaluate the training, but to iden-
tify those aspects of training that were critical-
alone  or  in  interaction  with  other  organiza-
tional  factors.  In  this  way,  the  stories  serve 
both to  document  outcomes, but also to  guide 
management  about  needed  organizational 
changes  that  will  accomplish  broader  organ-
izational  performance  goals.  Kibel  (1999)  de-
scribes  a  related  success  story  method  that 
involves  more  complex  data  gathering  and 
scoring  procedures  and  that  is  designed  for  a 
broader range of human service programs. 
 
Narratives With Emerging Themes 
A  different  approach  to  narrative  meth-
ods  is  found  within  qualitative  case  studies 
(Costantino & Greene, 2003). Here, stories are 
used  to  understand  context,  culture,  and  par-
ticipants’  experiences  in  relation  to  program 
activities  and  outcomes.  As  with  most  case 
studies,  this  method  can  require  site  visits, 
review  of  documents,  participant  observation, 
and  persona.  The  authors  changed  their  origi-
nal  practice  of  summarizing  stories  to  include 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
101
verbatim transcripts, some of which contained 
interwoven mini stories. In this way they were 
able  to  portray  a  much  richer  picture  of  the 
program  (itself  an  intergenerational  storytel-
ling program) and of relationships among par-
ticipants  and  staff,  and  they  were  able  to  use 
stories  as  a  significant  part  of  the  reported 
data. 
Nelson  (1998)  describes  a  similar  ap-
proach  that  uses  both  individual  and  group 
storytelling  in  evaluating  youth  development 
and risk prevention programs.  
 
Narratives Linked to a Theory of Change 
The  previous  uses  of  narrative  empha-
size  inquiry  more  than  OD  perspectives.  Ap-
preciative  inquiry (AI) represents the  opposite 
emphasis,  although  it  relies  heavily  on  data 
collection  and  analysis  (Barrett  &  Fry,  2002). 
The  AI  method  evolved  over  time  within  the 
OD  field  as  a  form  of  inquiry  designed  to 
identify  potential  for  innovation  and  motiva-
tion in organizational groups. AI is an attempt 
to  move  away  from  deficit  and  problem-
solving  orientations  common  to  most  evalua-
tion  and  OD  work  and  move  toward  “peak 
positive  experiences”  that  occur  within  or-
ganizations.  AI  uses  explicitly  collaborative 
interviewing  and  narrative  methods  in  its  ef-
fort  to  draw  on  the  power  of  social  construc-
tionism to shape the future. AI is based on so-
cial  constructionism’s  concept  that  what  you 
look  for is  what you  will find, and  where  you 
think you are going is where you will end up. 
The AI approach involves several struc-
tured  phases  of  systematic  inquiry  into  peak 
experiences and their causes, along  with  crea-
tive ideas about how to sustain  current  valued 
innovations in the organizational process. Sto-
ries  are  shared  among  stakeholders  as  part  of 
the analysis and the process to plan change. AI 
can  include  attention  to  problems  and  can 
blend  with  evaluation  that  emphasizes  ac-
countability,  but  it  is  decidedly  effective  as  a 
means of socially creating provocative innova-
tions that will sustain progress. 
This  brief  overview  of  narrative  meth-
ods  shows  promise  for  drawing  more  explicit 
connections  between  the  fields  of  program 
evaluation and OD. In addition, training in the 
use of narrative methods is one means of inte-
grating the skill sets and goals of each profes-
sion to sustain and improve programs. 
 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 
1.  Barrett,  F.,  Fry,  R.  (2002).  Appreciative 
inquiry  in  action:  The  unfolding  of  a  pro-
vocative  invitation.  In  R.  Fry,  F.  Barrett,  J. 
Seiling,  D.  Whitney  (Eds.),  Appreciative 
inquiry  and  organizational  transformation: 
Reports from the field. Westport, CT: Quo-
rum Books. 
2. Brinkerhoff, R. O. (2003). The success case 
method:  Find  out  quickly  what’s  working 
and what’s not. Berrett-Koehler Publishers. 
3. Costantino, R. D.,Greene, J. C. (2003). Re-
flections  on  the  use  of  narrative  in  evalua-
tion. American Journal of Evaluation, 24(1), 
35–49. 
4.  Dart,  J.,  Davies,  R.  (2003).  A  dialogical, 
story-based  evaluation  tool:  The  most  sig-
nificant  change  technique.  American  Jour-
nal of Evaluation, 24(2), 137–155. 
5. Kibel, B. M. (1999). Success stories as hard 
data:  An  introduction  to  results  mapping. 
New York: Kluwer/Plenum. 
 
 
 
УДК 802.5 
GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF BUSINESS FRENCH AND ITS 
DEFINITION 
Maximova X. 
 
The concern of this article is to arrive at 
a  workable  definition  of  Business  French. 
However,  instead  of  giving  a  straight  answer 
to  the  question  “What  does  Business  French 
mean?”  we  would  prefer  to  let  it  gradually 
emerge  while  working  through  this  article.  It 
would  be  reasonable  to  start  with  a  simpler 
question –  why Business French? It was quite 
possible  for  French  language  world  to  live 
without  it  for  many  years,  why  Business 
French  became  so  important  part  of  French 
language  teaching?  In  this  section  we  will  try 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
102
to  find  out  which  were  the  factors  that  led  to 
the emergence of Business French and its sub-
sequent development. 
The  first  few  years  of  the  twenty-first 
century have witnessed two major examples of 
such change  with the  inauguration  of the  euro 
into  general  use  on  January  1,  2002,  and  the 
expansion  of  the  European  Union  from  15  to 
25 members on May 1, 2004. The rejection by 
the French electorate of the constitution of the 
European Union in May of 2005 notwithstand-
ing, these events have had a profound and last-
ing  impact  on  France’s  relationship  with  its 
neighbours, which leads one to question if and 
how  these  phenomena  will  influence  the 
teaching  of  business  French  as  a  discipline. 
One  undeniable  fact  is  that  the  recent  events 
that are consequences of France’s membership 
in  the  European  Union  are  just  some  of  the 
many current factors that have rendered  many 
existing  pedagogical  materials  for  business 
French to a certain extent obsolete, as the con-
tent  within  these  texts  has  become  increas-
ingly  out-dated. Similarly, the radical changes 
implemented  in  2000  by  the  Chambre  de 
Commerce  et  d’Industrie  de  Paris  in  terms  of 
the  exams  administered  by  its  Direction  des 
Relations Internationales  have  had a consider-
able  impact  on  the  discipline  of  business 
French  in  two  respects:  first,  on  the  method-
ologies  in  those  business  French  classes  for 
which  the  international  exams  have  tradition-
ally  been  utilized  as  a  means  of  measuring 
student  competency  and/or  as a  means  of  stu-
dent  evaluation;  and  second,  on  those  text-
books  oriented  primarily  toward  preparing 
students  for  these  same  exams.  In  fact,  the 
textbooks are often used even by those instruc-
tors  with  little  or  no  interest  in  the  interna-
tional exams. 
These few examples amply demonstrate 
to  what  extent  the  instructor  of  business 
French  must  constantly  be  in  search  of  new 
resources. Both  external and  internal changes, 
such as those in the business climate in France 
and  the  Francophone  world,  the  unending 
growth of the World Wide Web as a source of 
materials,  as  well  as  the  publication  of  new 
textbooks and resource aids require instructors 
to  regularly  reconsider  how  business  French 
can and should be taught. There are some fac-
tors  that  are  currently,  and  will  in  the  future, 
have a significant  impact on this field and the 
pedagogical materials associated with it. Many 
of these are, in fact, “internal,” in that they are 
related  less  to  changes  in  France  and  French 
business  practices,  and  more  to  developments 
in  perceptions  of  the  field  of  business  French 
among its practitioners. 
One of the fundamental issues that must 
be confronted deals with the very terminology 
commonly  employed  to  delineate  this  field; 
consequently,  one  might  begin  by  posing  the 
question:  “What’s  in  a  name”.  This  is  a  field 
traditionally  called  “business  French.”  A 
glance  at  the  titles  of  the  textbooks  that  have 
been  on  the  market  since  the  early  history  of 
this  discipline  reveals  that  the  words  business 
or affaires have usually been  included in their 
titles:  “Le  nouveau  français  des  affaires”, 
“Parlons  affaires”,  “Affaires  à  suivre”,  “Le 
français  des  affaires  par  la  video”,  “Faire  des 
affaires en français”, etc., to cite  just a few  of 
the  best-known  examples.  Most  other  text-
books,  if  they  have  not  featured  in  their  titles 
either  of  these  two  words,  have  alternately 
featured  the  words  commercial,  as  in  Mauger 
and  Charon’s  “Le  français  commercial”,  or 
enterprise, as in Danilo and Tauzin’s “Le fran-
çais de l’entreprise”.  
This  nomenclature is  equally  evident  in 
the  pedagogical  volumes  published  between 
1995  and  2003  by  the  American  Association 
of  Teachers  of  French’s  commission  on 
French  for  Business  and  Economic  Purposes 
(whose  name  alone  is  significant).  These  vol-
umes,  the  only  ones  of  their  kind  devoted  to 
the  discipline  during  this  period,  all  include 
business in their titles: “Issues and Methods in 
French for Business and Economic Purposes”, 
“Making  Business  French  Work”,  and  “Edu-
cating for International Expertise: Perspectives 
on  Cross-Cultural  Competence”  and  “French 
for Business”.  
Finally,  the  two  regularly  published 
journals  devoted  to  “business  languages”  also 
reflect the trend: “The Journal of Language for 
International  Business”  and  “Global  Business 
Languages”.  It  is  important  to  mention  these 
examples  not  to  restate  the  obvious,  but  to 
contextualize them within an apparent shift, on 
the  other  side  of  the  Atlantic,  in  terms  of  the 
categorization  of  this  field  that  may,  or  may 
not,  have  an  impact  on  how  the  discipline  is 
taught  in  the  future.  This  subtle  development 
may be an indication of a change in attitude in 
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   53




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет