Вестник Казахстанско-Американского


Comparison of the Described Cases



жүктеу 5.1 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
бет16/53
Дата25.04.2017
өлшемі5.1 Kb.
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   53

 
Comparison of the Described Cases 
The  comparison  is  done  so  that  differ-
ences  and  similarities  between  the  cases  be-
come clearer.  
When  it  comes  to  the  use  of  the  state 
language,  the  minority  language  and  the  for-
eign language in education, differences can be 
found between the two cases.  
In Finland, the Finnish language is usu-
ally the first language to be used as a medium 
of  instruction  and  English  or  Swedish  is  the 
second school language. Thus English can also 
be  the  third  language  and  in  a  few  schools 
German  or  French  can  be  the  third  language. 
However,  some  schools  start  with  Swedish 
immersion  for  children  with  Finnish  as  their 
mother tongue and then introduce Finnish and 
English.  
In  primary  education  in  the  Basque 
Country there are three models with respect to 
the  three  languages.  In  Model  D  schools, 
Basque  can  be  considered  the  medium  of  in-
struction, Spanish the school subject and Eng-
lish is always the third language of instruction. 
Model  A  schools  use  Spanish  as  the  medium 
of instruction and Basque as the school subject 
and  then  there  are  Model  B  schools  in  which 
both languages are used equally.  
The  one  thing  the  two  cases  have  in 
common  is  the  fact  that  the  trilingual  schools 
are in a bilingual region instead of a trilingual 
region where all three languages are spoken in 
daily  life.  The  third  language,  English,  is 
taught  as  a  language  that  can  be  used  in  the 
international communication. What is different 
between the cases is the function of the minor-
ity  language  in  daily  life.  Basque  is  perhaps 
much  higher  valued  by  the  population  than 
Swedish  and  Frisian  in  relationship  to  the  na-
tional language.  
Trilingual  primary  education  in  the  re-
gions  at  issue  has  different  backgrounds. 
Finland  has  had  experience  in  bilingual  pri-
mary education since 1968, when the learning 
of  two  languages  became  obligatory.  In  1991 
it  became  possible  to  use  not  only  Finnish  or 
Swedish as a medium of instruction. However, 
approval  was  necessary  of  the  teaching  staff, 
the students and their parents. Since then, sev-
eral  experiments  in  trilingual  education  were 
initiated.  
In  the  Basque  Country  bilingual  pri-
mary  education  was  regulated  in  1982,  when 
schools  could  be  divided  according  to  three 
models. The educational system in the Basque 
Country  has  adopted  a  third  language  into 
primary education in the early Nineties.  
The  design  of  trilingual  primary  educa-
tion in the different regions is largely depend-
ent  on  the  different  attainment  goals  that  are 
set for every language.  
In the Finnish case, it is  mentioned that 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
88
it  is  the  intention  of  the  Swedish  immersion 
programs to better prepare the students for the 
labour  market,  specifically  on  the  Nordic 
common trade  market. English, as a third lan-
guage  is  not  used  in  daily  life  in  Finland  as 
such,  although  pupils  are  exposed  to  English 
in the media. Therefore English is less directly 
instrumental  for  most  students,  although  the 
foreign  language  enables  them  to  communi-
cate on an international level. This is probably 
the same for the other two cases selected.  
In the  Basque Country the  goals  of lan-
guage  teaching  differ  per  model.  Model  A 
schools  use  mainly  Spanish  and  have  adopted 
Basque  and  English  as  additional  subjects  in 
enrichment  programs.  Model  B  schools  try  to 
promote  proficiency  in  both  Spanish  and 
Basque and on those schools English is an en-
richment program. The  model D schools rein-
force  the  Basque  language  in  school  so  chil-
dren  become  fully  competent  in  Basque  and 
Spanish, but these schools also try to raise the 
level  of  proficiency  in  English.  Whereas  the 
pupils  in  Finland  and  in  the  Netherlands  are 
exposed to a relatively high amount of English 
in the  media, the pupils in Spain  do  not regu-
larly see or hear English in daily life.  
The  age-factor  is  an  important  issue  in 
the  discussion  about  trilingual  primary  educa-
tion. Different theories exist as to when a sec-
ond and a third language should be introduced 
to  pupils. The  belief  that  children  learn  a  lan-
guage  more  easily  when  they  are  young  is 
widespread.  
As  primary  school  starts  in  Finland  at 
the  age  of  seven,  all  pupils  involved  in  trilin-
gual  primary  education  first  receive  teaching 
in  Finnish  and  Swedish  at  the  age  of  seven. 
Some pupils already receive  language  instruc-
tion  in  two  or  three  languages  in  pre-primary 
school.  When  that  project  first  started,  Swed-
ish was introduced to the children at the age of 
six  and  English  was  introduced  at  the  age  of 
nine.  Nowadays  pupils  start  with  Swedish  at 
the age of five and English at the age of seven, 
whereas Finnish is used for a couple of hours / 
week  in  grade  1  to  approximately  half  of  the 
instruction time in grade 6.  
In the Basque Country the pupils attend-
ing the trilingual programs are younger than in 
Finland.  Most  pupils  are  introduced  to  the 
three  languages  successively  between  the  age 
of  four and six, although primary school  does 
not start until the age of six, when compulsory 
education starts. A few schools introduce Eng-
lish at the compulsory age of eight.  
It is  difficult to teach a language or use 
a  language  to  teach  a  particular  subject,  if 
teaching  materials  are  not  adequate  for  the 
teaching  process.  This  might  even  have  a 
negative effect on the motivation for pupils to 
learn the target language.  
In  Finland  traditionally  a  textbook  and 
an  exercise  book  are  used  for  the  teaching 
process.  Teachers  at  the  primary  school  use 
more  and  more  self-made  materials  or  com-
bine information from different materials. The 
teachers also use the library and the possibility 
to  exchange  books  on  a  regular  basis,  so  that 
each  group  of  pupils  has  access  to  different 
books  addressing  the  same  subject.  This  way, 
pupils  also  have  the  opportunity  to  learn  to 
enjoy  reading  books  and  get  acquainted  with 
literature. Despite all these provisions there  is 
still a need for more flexible instruction mate-
rials, developed especially for immersion edu-
cation.  
In the  Basque Country the  materials for 
Basque  and  Spanish  are  very  diverse:  text-
books,  exercise  books,  audio-visual  materials 
and  multimedia.  All  of  them  are  being  pub-
lished  on  a  large  scale.  Teacher  trainers  and 
teachers  themselves  usually  specially  develop 
the  materials  for  the  teaching  of  English  be-
tween the ages four and eight. Teaching mate-
rials for the teaching in English between eight 
and twelve are widely available and have been 
published by commercial institutions.  
For a trilingual program to be effective, 
a  certain  number  of  hours  per  week  over  the 
primary  school  period  must  be  spent  in  those 
languages.  In  Finland  usually  Finnish  is  the 
language  most  used  in  class.  Swedish  is  used 
for  only  a  couple  of  hours.  Where  English  is 
used as a medium of instruction, the time allo-
cated to this language is comparable to Swed-
ish.  By  contrast,  the  school  in  Vaasa  uses  the 
first  language  (Finnish)  in  grades  1  and  2  for 
two hours per week, while English is used for 
one  hour  per  week.  The  immersion  language 
(Swedish) is used for the remaining  hours (17 
hours  per  week).  In  grades  3  and  4  Finnish  is 
used for seven hours per week. English is used 
for  two  hours  per  week  and  Swedish  is  used 
for 14 hours per week. In  grades 5 and 6 Fin-
nish  is  medium  of  instruction  for  7-11  hours 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
89
per  week,  English  two  hours  per  week  and 
Swedish 13-17 hours per week.  
In  the  Basque  Country  the  time  allo-
cated to the teaching in the three different lan-
guage  differs  per  school  model.  In  model  A 
schools  Spanish  is  mainly  used  as  medium  of 
instruction and Basque and English are taught 
for  three  to  four  hours  per  week.  In  model  B 
schools time is divided equally between Span-
ish  and  Basque  as  medium  of  instruction  and 
English  is  taught  for  three  to  four  hours  per 
week.  In  model  D  schools  Basque  is  used  a 
medium  of  instruction  and  Spanish  and  Eng-
lish  are  taught  for  three  to  four  hours  per 
week. In some schools English is also used as 
a medium of instruction. For example, in three 
experimental  D  type  schools,  English  was 
used to teach content for seven hours per week 
in grades 3-6.  
Not all  subjects  lend  themselves  equally 
well  to  be  taught  in  a  foreign  language.  In 
Finland practically all subjects can be taught in 
Swedish. Mostly environmental studies, music, 
mathematics and arts are taught in either Swed-
ish or English. In Vaasa the subjects are taught 
in thematic units of different length. It is there-
fore difficult to state what subjects are taught in 
which language.  
In  the  Basque  Country  Spanish  is  used 
for all subjects in model A schools, and Basque 
in  model  D  schools.  In  model  B  schools  each 
for  them  decide  when  to  use  which  language 
for  which  subject.  In  principle  Basque  and 
Spanish are both equally used for every subject. 
English  is  usually  used  for  handicrafts,  but 
some schools teach science, music and sports in 
English. Some schools use English in a content 
based approach and include units on mathemat-
ics, science or social sciences.  
 
Opportunities for multilingual education in 
Kazakhstan 
As  we  have  already  mentioned  multilin-
gualism  can  be  the  result  of  different  factors. 
Kazakhstan  is  a  unique  place,  since  in  com-
bines  several  of  the  factors,  which  determine 
the  use  of  two  languages  on  its  territory  and 
stimulate learning of English as the language of 
globalization.  
There  are  lots  of  reasons  which  deter-
mine  use  of  both  Kazakh  and  Russian  lan-
guages  on  the  territory  of  Kazakhstan  because 
Russian and  Kazakhstan  have  long  established 
ties.  Historically  Russian  people  lived  on  the 
territory of contemporary Kazakhstan, and Ka-
zakhstan  once  was  a part  of  the  Soviet  Union. 
Thus,  its  population  has  been  exposed  to  the 
Russian language for more than one century. 
Kazakhstan and Russia have strong  eco-
nomic and cultural ties, which were established 
ling ago and are still existent. Russian has long 
been  the  language  of  science,  research  and 
technology,  and  is  still  of  great  importance. 
According  to  the  census  of  2009  63%  of  the 
population  are  Kazakhs  and  about  24%  of  the 
population are Russians [6]. 
Everything mentioned above creates the 
situation  in  which  two  languages  co-exist  and 
are  necessary  in  everyday  communication. 
Beside  English  and  Russian,  English  has 
gained  importance  as  the  language  of  global-
ization and intercultural communication.  
Both  Kazakh  and  Russian  are  used  in 
governmental organizations, local  government 
institutions,  documentation  of  state  and  gov-
ernmental  institutions,  constitutional  docu-
mentation, arbitration  courts, military, field  of 
science  (including  defense  of  dissertations); 
names  of  state  institutions,  texts  of  seals  and 
stamps  regardless  of  the  form  of  ownership, 
labels of goods, all texts of visual information 
[5].  
Either  Kazakh  or  Russian  may  be  used 
in  postal-telegraphic  messages  and  customs 
documentation. 
Both  Russian  and  other  languages  (if 
necessary)  may  be  used  in  localities  of  com-
pact residence of ethnic groups in: documenta-
tion  of  non-governmental  institutions,  courts, 
documentation  of  administrative  offences, 
contracts  of  individuals  and  legal  entities,  re-
sponses 
of 
governmental 
and 
non-
governmental  institutions  to  requests  of  citi-
zens,  paper  forms,  information  signs,  an-
nouncements,  advertisements,  price  catalogs 
and  lists;  pre-school  institutions,  orphanages; 
high, vocational and higher education; cultural 
events; press, radio and TV programs. 
The Republic of Kazakhstan has adopted 
a  policy  according  to  which  a  lot  of  attention 
should  be  paid  to  learning  and  being  able  to 
communicate  in  these  two  languages  equally 
well.  State  educational  standards  imply  inte-
grating the three languages into the school cur-
ricula.  
Now let us consider school education ac-

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
90
cording  to  the  same  criteria  we  used  for  de-
scribing  trilingual  schools  in  Finland  and  the 
Basque country.  
Kazakhstan  is  a  bilingual  country:  the 
Kazakh language, spoken by 63% of the popu-
lation,  has  the  status  of  the  "state"  language, 
while  Russian,  which  is  spoken  by  almost  all 
Kazakhstanis,  is  declared  the  "official"  lan-
guage, and is used routinely in business.  
In  the  previous  two  cases  we  described 
two  of  the  three  languages  belong  to  the  same 
language family: English and Swedish, English 
and  German.  The  languages  involved  in  the 
trilingual  education  in  Kazakhstan  also  belong 
to  two  different  language  groups:  English  and 
Russian  both  belong  to  Indo-European  lan-
guages  of  West-Germanic  and  East-Slavonic 
groups  respectively,  Kazakh  is  a  Turkic  lan-
guage. 
Attempts to establish trilingual education 
have  been  made  since  the  early  90s  when  Ka-
zakhstan  gained  independence.  Like  in  the 
Basque country there were established different 
models of schools:  
Model A schools are intended for native 
speakers  of  Russian  who  choose  to  be  in-
structed in Russian. Kazakh is taught as a sec-
ond language for five hours a week since the 1
st
 
grade.  
Model B schools are intended for native 
speakers  of  Kazakh  who  want  to  be  instructed 
in  Kazakh.  Russian  is  taught  as  a  second  lan-
guage for five hours a week since the 1
st
 grade. 
In both types of schools English is taught 
as  a  foreign  language  beginning  with  the  5
th
 
grade for three hours a week (like in immersion 
schools of Finland). 
Like  in  Finland,  the  national  language 
program  encourages  early  introduction  of  sev-
eral languages. Traditionally, the languages are 
introduced during specific language lessons and 
thus  are  kept  separate  from  other  content  les-
sons  and  are  not  used  as  languages  of  instruc-
tion.  
We have already mentioned that teaching 
a  second  and  foreign  language  can  be  done 
through  a  second/foreign  language  program  or 
by  immersion  language  program.  It  turns  out 
that  none  of  our  secondary  schools  actually 
suggests  language  immersion  programs  since 
only  13%  of  the  curricula  is taught  in  the  sec-
ond  language  (in  Russian  for  schools  with  the 
Kazakh language of instruction, and in Kazakh 
in  schools  with  instruction  in  Russian),  and 
even less – 8% of the curricula is taught in Eng-
lish. At that none of these learning is a content 
learning;  it  is  acquiring  second  or  foreign  lan-
guage  for  practical  purposes.  This  is  probably 
the  main  reason  why  school  graduates  are  not 
proficient  in  speaking  three  languages  as  it  is 
intended to be.  
We  have considered the phenomenon of 
multilingual education as a social and linguistic 
phenomenon.  To  complete  the  project  we  set 
certain  objectives  which  have  been  fulfilled  in 
the current research. 
1)  First,  we  studied  the  phenomenon  of 
multilingualism  and  found  out  that  multilin-
gualism  is  the  ability  of  an  individual  speaker 
or all members of the community to speak mul-
tiple  languages.  We  described  reasons  which 
contribute  to  the  development  of  multilingual-
ism, including colonialism, migrations, political 
and cultural ties, education, etc.  
2) To get a better understanding of what 
multilingual education is we studied the experi-
ence  of two European countries in establishing 
trilingual  schools.  We  studied  the  language 
immersion  program  in  schools  of  inland  and 
different models of schools in the Basque coun-
try (Spain). 
3)  We  found  out  that  being  different  by 
their  organization  trilingual  schools  in  Finland 
and Spain have some common features. In par-
ticular,  in  both  cases  languages  are  introduced 
to school children at a quite early age and a part 
of  the  content  learning  in  these  countries  is 
done through the second language.  
4) Finally we studied the possibilities for 
multilingual education development in Kazakh-
stan. We started with reasons that promote use 
of  several  languages  in  the  Republic  of  Ka-
zakhstan,  compared  the  system  of  language 
learning  in  Kazakhstan  to  two  described  cases 
of Finland and Spain, found out similarities and 
differences between them. We managed to find 
out that in terms of reasons, experience, teach-
ing  materials, age of students and etc. our sys-
tem  of  language  learning  does  not  differ  much 
from  the  systems  of  language  learning  in 
Finland  and  Spain.  The  reason  why  Kazakh-
stan’s  attempt  to  establish  trilingual  education 
is less successful in our opinion lies in the fact 
that  we  approach  it  a  second/foreign  language 
program, not as a language immersion program, 
which provides content learning in the language 

ЛИНГВОДИДАКТИКА 
 
 
Вестник КАСУ
 
91
other  than  native  and  thus  guarantees  better 
results.  
 
BIBLIOGRAPHY 
1. Beetsma, D. (ed) Trilingual Primary Educa-
tion  in  Europe.  Inventory  of  the  provisions 
for trilingual primary  education  in  minority 
language communities of the European Un-
ion 
2.  Delpit,  L.,  Dowdy,  J.  K.  (ed)  The  skin  that 
we  speak.  Thoughts  on  language  and 
culture  in  the  classroom.    The  New  Press. 
New York 
3. Gorter, D. et al. Cultural diversity as an as-
set  for  human  welfare  and  development. 
Benefits of linguistic diversity and multilin-
gualism. Position paper of research task 1.2  
4.  Hoffmann,  C.,  Towards  a  description  of 
trilingual  competence.  International  Journal 
of  Bilingualism,  Vol.  5,  No.  1  (March) 
2001, pp. 1-17 
5.  The  Constitution  of  the  Republic  of  Ka-
zakhstan 
 
 
 
УДК 378.14:81’243 
О РЕАЛИЗАЦИИ КОНЦЕПЦИИ РАЗВИТИЯ КАФЕДРЫ ИНОСТРАННЫХ 
ЯЗЫКОВ ПО ПОВЫШЕНИЮ КАЧЕСТВА ПОДГОТОВКИ ПО 
ИНОСТРАННОМУ ЯЗЫКУ БАКАЛАВРОВ, МАГИСТРАНТОВ И 
ДОКТОРАНТОВ 
Сарсембаева А.А. 
 
Концепция  развития  кафедры  ино-
странных  языков  по  повышению  качества 
подготовки  по  иностранному  языку  бака-
лавров,  магистрантов  и  докторантов  была 
разработана  на  кафедре  иностранных  язы-
ков ВКГТУ им. Д. Серикбаева и обсуждена 
на УМС университета в 2011 году. Данная 
концепция  разработана  на  основе  Закона 
Республики Казахстан от 27 июля 2007 го-
да  «Об  образовании»  (4);  ГОСО  РК 
5.04.019 – 2011 Бакалавриат. Магистратура. 
Докторантура  (1;  2;  3);  Концепции  разви-
тия  иноязычного  образования  Республики 
Казахстан (Каз УМО и МЯ им. Абылай ха-
на)  (5);  Общеевропейских  компетенций 
владения  иностранным  языком:  Europarat. 
Rat  für  kulturelle  Zusammenarbeit:  Gemein-
samer  europäischer  Referenzrahmen  für  Spra-
chen:  lernen,  lehren,  beurteilen  (Strassburg, 
2001) (6).  
Согласно  ГОСО  РК  5.04.019  –  2011 
(Бакалавриат),  дисциплина  «Иностранный 
язык»  входит  в  цикл  ООД,  и  на  данную 
дисциплину  определяется  6  кредитов,  кро-
ме этого, в обязательный компонент цикла 
БД 
включается 
«Профессионально-
ориентированный  иностранный  язык»  в 
объеме не менее 3 кредитов.  
Согласно  ГОСО  РК  5.04.019  –  2011 
(Магистратура),  (магистратура  по  научно-
му  и  педагогическому  направлению,  маги-
стратура  по  профильному  направлению) 
дисциплина  «Иностранный  язык  (профес-
сиональный)»  входит  в  обязательный  ком-
понент цикла БД, и на данную дисциплину 
определяется 2 кредита. 
Согласно  ГОСО  РК  5.04.019  –  2011 
(Докторантура)  (доктор  PhD  и  доктор  по 
профилю), 
дисциплина 
«Иностранный 
язык»  входит  в  обязательный  компонент 
цикла  БД,  и  на  данную  дисциплину  опре-
деляется не менее 4 кредитов. 
В  связи  с  поставленными  в  ГОСО 
требованиями,  концепция  развития  кафед-
ры  определяет  основную  стратегическую 
цель  своей  реализации  –  повышение  уров-
ня  и  качества  подготовки  бакалавров,  ма-
гистрантов,  докторантов  по  иностранному 
языку  путем  формирования  у  них  комму-
никативной,  профессиональной,  лингвис-
тической, прагматической, дискурсивной и 
социо-культурной компетенций. 
В  содержание  лингвистической  ком-
петенции  входит  знание  и  умение  приме-
нять в коммуникативной и профессиональ-
ной  деятельности  фонологические,  лекси-
ческие,  грамматические  явления  иностран-
ного  языка  в  определенном  программой 
объеме.  
Дискурсивный  компонент  предпола-
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   53




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет