С. Г. Тажбаева Редакция алқасы



жүктеу 5.06 Kb.

бет11/49
Дата12.01.2017
өлшемі5.06 Kb.
1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   49

Abstract:Culture and language are means of collective co-existence and social practice kept in the memory of the society 
that is created by the people during the centuries. Cultural awareness helps people to become more understanding and tolerant 
of behaviors which are different from their own.That individual is a thinker, a creator, a transmitter of the culture, he is the 
part of the society, and he uses the language for communication with other members of this society where he is supposed to be 
understood as they belong to the same community. The problems of formation and development of students’ competences at 
the lessons of foreign language are considered as the most important aims to achieve at the lessons of foreign language.It is 
important  to  know  the  meaning  and  definitions  of  the  term  “competence”  and  “competency”,  to  elicit  the  main  goals  of 
education  directed  to  development  and  acquisition  of  these  competences  by  students.  Such  basic  competences  like 
communicative,  linguistic,  lingua-cultural,  socio-cultural,  strategic,  language  and  discourse  competences  attract  special 
attention, the development and improving of which are of great importance in teaching process seems to be actual today. The 
article discusses the features of teaching English to students of non-language specialty using information and communication 
technologies,  as  well  as  questions  on  the  quality  of  education  using  innovative  technologies  in  teaching  non-language 
universities.Feature  of  learning  English  with  the  help  of  advanced  information  technology  is  that  the  presentation  of 
educational  material  can  be  not  only  a  teacher,  but  also  by  a  computer.  The  use  of  different  teaching  methods  (tier, 
communication, information-communicative and others.) Ensure the formation and development of creative abilities of the 
individual  capable  of  arguments  to  express  and  defend  their  point  of  view.  Indicates  the  need  for  appropriate  training 
curriculum goals. 
Key  words:to  develop  skills  training,  modern  education  system,  innovative  technology  Pedagogical  training,  and 
proficient in the language. 
 
УДК 378.016:811.111 
 
ROLE – PLAYING AS INTERACTIVE METHOD OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING 
 
A.A. Orazova – teacher, master of philology, Foreign language practice department, 
Ablai Khan University of International Relations and World Languages 
 
Summare 
In  these  days  teaching  foreign  language  is  based  on  the  idea  that  the  goal  of  language  acquisition  is  communicative 
competence.  In  order  to  motivate,  to  arouse  student’s  interest  to  the  subject,  to  make  them  use  language  for  speaking  the 
teachers of the foreign language is often use role – plays at the lessons. Role – play is a very important part in coping with a 
foreign  language.  It  encourages  thinking  and  creativity,  helps  students  develop  and  practice  new  language  and  behavioral 
skills in a relatively no threatening setting, and can create the motivation and involvement necessary for learning to occur. In 
my opinion, role – play is the most interesting way for students to show how they master the language, their creativity and for 
the teacher the most suitable techniques for teaching communicative English thus I found it to be important and interesting for 
me as a teacher of foreign language to research the role-playing technologies as interactive forms of teaching discourse. 
Key words: role-play, role-card, communicative approach, learner, dialogue, speech ability  
 
Teaching  is  seen  from  many  angles.  Many  students,  educators  andparents  effectively  demonstrate  that  they 
think teaching consists of pouring knowledge into the student's head - akin to prying the lid off a can and filling it 
with paint. 
Despite the wide spread application of this approach it is not in fact the best way for students to learn. In fact, it 
is a native view of the first stages of learning. Teaching can ideally be seen as a dynamic balance between the 
teacher and student both interacting together and with a body of knowledge. In early stages the process may seem 
very teacher centered. As learning progresses the interaction will take on new balances. As the student beginning 
to be conversant with the terms and operations of the body of knowledge being studied he/she begins to need to 
interact directly with the subject. There is a point in the learning process that the student not only contributes to 
the knowledge of the teacher but also deposits new information to the common wisdom. 
 
 

Абай атындағы ҚазҰПУ-нің Хабаршысы, «Педагогика ғылымдары» сериясы, №3(47), 2015 г. 
61 
Useful for cognitive and affective domains on task and structure reporting/product to ensure effective use of 
time 
Class discussion 
• Whole group participates 
• Teacher leads, coaches 
• Effective for upper level cognitive domain 
Discussion groups 
• Used for larger groups 
• Reduces anxiety 
• Groups may be structured for homogeneity or diversity 
• Teacher must circulate to keep groups 
Group projects 
• Teacher as consultant/manager of process 
• Useful for higher levels of learning 
• Encourages generic interpersonal, negotiation, teamwork skills 
• Evaluation can be difficult 
Peer teaching 
• Useful when great variance in levels of learning 
• Those who have mastered skill coach others 
• Can be used to master components of a task 
• Must ensure peer teachers are teaching material accurately and are competent instructors. 
Among  the  classroom  activities  role-play  and  stimulation  rate  highly  as  suitable  vehicles  to  use  in  a 
communicative  approach  to  language  teaching.  Used  well,  they  can  reduce  the  artificiality  of  the  classroom, 
provide a reason for talking and allow the learner to talk meaningfully to other learners. [1] 
The terms role-play and stimulation have been interpreted in many different ways by teachers and textbook 
writers,  and  as  stimulations  involve  role-playing,  it  is  best  to  look  first  at  some  different  language  learning 
activities that have been described as role-play. The following examples differ from each other in design and in 
what they allow the learner to achieve in class, but they share to a greater or lesser degree one feature of true role-
play: they have an element of freedom of choice for the student. It lies either in a freedom to choose whatever 
language he pleases or to develop the character or situation as he wishes 
Example 1 
At the Post Office 
A: B: A: B: A: B: 
I'd like to post this _______ Put it on the scales. Where to? 
To___________. That'll be ____________please. 
This type of exercise is familiar but it is role-play in that it differs from the controlled practice of a dialogue or 
dialogue  with  slots  for  the  learner  to  substitute  alternatives.  It  has  the  element  of  freedom  and  a  possibility  of 
surprise. B could quote a prohibitive price for sending the parcel or letter and A could decide not to send it. Where 
there is freedom there is also the opportunity for the learner to experiment — stretching his limited knowledge of 
the foreign language as he will have to do in real life. It is essential that the learner has this chance at certain points 
in his language learning programme and that the teacher accepts the probability of error. 
This example raises a point about the selection of a role-play situation. Unless B in Example 1 is, or is training 
to be, a Post Office Clerk he has no experience of the role in his first language and no need of it in the foreign 
language. On the other hand we must compromise; if we accept that A's role and the situation are relevant to most 
learners then we must accept B acting as a foil to A. However, the more remote the situation and the roles are 
from the experience of the learners the more 'unreal' the language they use becomes. For example, a role-play 
where a policeman confronts a motorist who has parked in the. Wrong place may provide a lot of fun, but may 
also result in 'fantasy' language with a very low priority as far as learner's needs are concerned. When this happens 
role-play reaches into the realms of drama and though it provides motivating practice in the foreign language it 
does not prepare the learner for the situation he might meet outside the classroom. Obviously the situations and 
roles must be selected with the needs of the students in mind. 
'A similar danger of overacting may arise when the learner takes the role of a character in the textbook and 
plays that character in a given situation. He is aware of the personality of the textbook character, his appearance 
and even the way he speaks. The learner has the support and protection of a mask to hide behind but he will speak 
as the character in the situation and not as himself.' In the following example, on the other hand, the learner is 
himself and is given guidance as to what to say and how to say it. 

Вестник КазНПУ им. Абая, серия«Педагогические науки», №3(47), 2015 г. 
62 
Example 2 
The Invitation 
You meet your friend B at school. You are having a party on Saturday and you would like B to come. The 
party is informal. Tell B what time to come. Say how glad you are that he is coming. 
Cues: 
— We're having a party... 
Are you doing anything on Saturday? 
— It's very informal . . . Come as you are. 
— That's great. That'll be lovely. 
The cues offer an alternative to 'Would you like to come to a party' and if they are new to the learner they 
change  the  nature  of  the  activity  from  using  language  that  he  already  knows  to  practicing  language  that  he  is 
learning. They also impose language upon him which might not suit his personality: there is a feminine ring to 
'That'll be lovely'. 
The role-card makes it clear that the learner is a student talking to a friend, a fellow student; the social situation 
and status of the speakers is clear. This helps the learner to recognize in the foreign language what he instinctively 
knows  in  his  mother  tongue,  that  different  people  are  addressed  in  different  ways  and  that  he  cannot  rely  on 
learning formula for all situations. 
Example 3 
Borrowing something A 
2 Friends 
Communication in the Classroom 
2 Friends 
Ask B to lend you something 
Give reason 
Agree 
Thank B 
End conversation 
Ask reason 
Agree: add a condition 
Give object to A (words or action) 
End conversation 
Here  again  the  relationship  is  made  clear.  The  learners  are  given  (he  moves  in  order  and  are  free  to  use 
whatever language they wish. The element of surprise brought in by the information gap between the pair-cards 
provides  something  of  the  spontaneity  of  a  real  exchange.  It  is  therefore  more  in  line  with  a  communicative 
approach than Examples 1 and 2. In classroom management terms though, Example 1 is easier for the teacher in 
that it can be found in the textbook or written on the blackboard. Examples 2 and 3 on the other hand are designed 
with an information gap, and wherever information gap techniques are used of least two different role-cards are 
necessary. The teacher may need to prepare this himself. However, the advantage of pair work cards is that more 
than one role-play situation can be given out at a time and then pairs of learners can exchange cards when they 
have finished. In this way the more able learners may complete 3 or 4 exchanges while the slower ones complete 
only one. The teacher can also grade the difficulty of the situations and give the more difficult pair cards to the 
more advanced learners. In this way there is some allowance for the individual's level and learning pace. 
A disadvantage of the role-card design in Example 3 is that the learners have to be taught the language of the 
instructions, for example, agree: add a condition. However, the role-cards do provide the structure of the exchange 
without  imposing  any  language.  This  advantage  is  shared  by  pictorial  role-cards  showing  events  in  sequence; 
these avoid the use of written instructions and are particularly useful with younger learners. [2]  
In  all  these  examples  the  exchange  has  been  very  limited;  the  role-play  has  provided  practice  in  particular 
language  functions  within  a  narrow  situation.  Role-play  within  a  stimulation  on  the  other  hand  allows  for 
extended interaction between learners. 
In a simulation the learner is given a task to perform or a problem to solve; the background information and the 
environment of the problem is simulated. For example the learner is given the information about a town and then 
told that a new motorway is to be built there. The learner has to discuss the best route for the new motorway. As a 
learning  technique  simulations  were  originally  used  in  business  and  military  training  and  the  outcome  of  a 
simulation was of paramount importance. In language learning the end-product, that is the decision the learners 
reach, is of less importance than the language used to achieve it. The learner however, must feel that the outcome 

Абай атындағы ҚазҰПУ-нің Хабаршысы, «Педагогика ғылымдары» сериясы, №3(47), 2015 г. 
63 
is important for then he will use language to achieve his objective as he would need to do outside the classroom. 
This is most obvious in a multi-lingual group where the foreign language is the only means of communication 
through which the partners or group can work as a team. 
In a monolingual group there is the obvious danger that the learners will lapse into their mother-tongue in the 
excitement. The teacher can bring this problem up with the class and possibly reach an agreement that when one 
member of a group lapses it is the duty of the others, and in particular the learner to whom he is speaking, to reply 
in  the  foreign  language.  It  becomes  even  more  important  with  a  monolingual  group  to  bring  as  much  of  the 
foreign language into the simulation as possible; a foreign language environment must be provided. Alternatively 
the  teacher  can  recognise  the  artificiality  of  a  monolingual  class  working  in  the  foreign  language  and  select 
simulations where it is notthe process that is the decision making, where the language practice takes place but in 
the end-product. For example the group can be required to use foreign language sources to compile a newspaper 
or 'radio programme', to do research or prepare a written or oral report. This is not 'surrender', it provides the class 
with a rehearsal for how they might really work with foreign language sources in their monolingual environment 
and provides valuable practice in changing from one language to the other. 
There are two ways of playing roles within a simulation: with a role-card and without one. When the learner 
has a role-card it can support him in different ways. It may describe in detail the personality or opinions of the 
character whose role he is taking. It may tell him how he feels to other members of the group or how to react to a 
particular  situation  if  it  arises.  Certain  types  of  interaction,  including  those  less  likely  to  be  found  in  the  usual 
classroom  exchanges,  can  be  built  into  the  simulation  through  the  role-card.  Hostility  or  stubbornness  which 
requires strong persuasion can be included. 
Example 4 
The Cambian Educational Aid Project 
You  are  on  good  terms  with  your  superior,  Mr.  Green,  the  Chief  Language  Inspector,  although  you  often 
disagree with him. However you are ready to argue against anything Mr. K. Brown, the Teacher Trainer says as 
you are old opponents. You want the money to be spent on tapes and tape recorders. 
— Point out that the country needs equipment. 
—  Argue  that  tape  recorders  would  be  easier  for  inexperienced  staff  and  technicians  than  language 
laboratories. 
Here Mr. Dawson knows his status and relationship with his superior, Mr. Green, and that he is not afraid to 
disagree  with  him.  He  also  has  a  clue  as  to  the  personality  of  Mr.  Dawson  who  is  likely  to  be  somewhat 
aggressive towards Mr. Brown. He is told what his attitude is and given some suggestions as to points he might 
make  during  the  discussion.  While  a  role-card  can  provide  a  mask  for  the  shy  learner,  it  can  also  have  an 
inhibiting effect upon a learner who receives a role-card which imposes a point of view upon him which he does 
not  share  or  requires  him  to  act  a  part  alien  to  him.  Role-cards  which  bring  out  emotional  extremes  or  acrid 
disagreement should be avoided. Playing roles can be dangerous and language teachers should step with care in 
this relatively unknown field. 
A simulation which is most likely to give the learner his nearest chance of 'reality' without the stresses of the 
outside situation is one where no role-card is given and he evolves his own role. In real life we all take 'roles' and 
are 'different' people depending on whether we are with our family, or friends or the boss. Thus, when no role-
card is given the learner faces the task or problem with his partner or the group and his role is determined by his 
own personality within the group and the job that he does in solving the problem. The learner is most likely to find 
his usual role when the problem is near to his own experience. 
Example 5 
What are they going to do when they leave school? 
In this stimulation a group of secondary school teachers learning English have the task of finding careers for 
four school leavers. They have details of the careers and openings available and the qualifications, training and 
characteristics needed for the job. They have to match this information with what they know of the boys and girls 
from  school  reports  and  references.  They  have  to  be  ready  to  suggest  careers  that  might  suit  and  interest  the 
school-leavers. The information they receive is both in print and on tape and so they practise both reading and 
listening  skills  as  they  collect  the  information.  No  role-cards  are  given  because  the  teachers  are  aware  of  the 
problems of school-leavers deciding on careers and can give their advice both as people and teachers. 
Stimulations deserve a more considered place within the teaching programme; they are more than just 'fun' 
activities  or  the  answer  to  the  conversation  class.  They  are  motivating  in  themselves,  they  provide  a  test  and 
feedback on communicative competence and help to develop empathy between learners; furthermore they provide 
a 'rehearsal for life'. [3]  

Вестник КазНПУ им. Абая, серия«Педагогические науки», №3(47), 2015 г. 
64 
I will give different definitions of the role-play interpreted by different authors.  
“In  role-playing,  participants  adopt  and  act  out  the  role  of  characters,  or  parts  that  may  have  personalities, 
motivations, and backgrounds different from their own. Role-playing is like being in an improvisational drama or 
free-form theatre, in which the participants are the actors who are playing parts, and the audience. People use the 
phrase "role-playing" in at least three distinct ways: to refer to the playing of roles generally such as in a theatre, or 
educational setting; to refer to a wide range of games including computer role-playing games, play-by-mail games 
and more; or to refer specifically to role-playing games.”[4]  
“Role playing – the acting out of the part, especially that of somebody with the particular social role in order to 
understand  the  role  of  the  person  better.  This  process  is  used  in  psychotherapy  and  in  training  people  in  inter 
personal skills.”[5]  
“Role  play  also  role  playing  –  drama  like  classroom  activities  in  which  students  take  the  roles  of  different 
participants in a situation and act out what might typically happen in that situation. For example, to practice how 
to express complaints and apologies in a foreign language, students might have to role – play a situation in which 
a customer in a shop returns a faulty article to a salesperson etc.”[6]  
According to Rebecca Teed, SERC from Carleton College“In most role-playing exercises, each student takes 
the role of a person affected by an issue and studies the impacts of the issues on human life and/or the effects of 
human activities on the world around us from the perspective of that person. More rarely, students take on the 
roles of some phenomena, such as part of an ecosystem, to demonstrate the lesson in an interesting and immediate 
manner. The instructor needs to decide the context for the exercise and the role(s) that the students will play. If the 
students are taking human roles, the context is generally a specific problem such as global warming or dealing 
with an active volcano. Lessons need to be carefully explained and supervised in order to involve the students and 
to enable them to learn as much as possible from the experience. However, a well-done scenario never runs the 
same  way  twice,  teaches  people  things  they  might  not  ordinarily  have  learned,  and  tends  to  be  fun  for  all 
involved.” 
 “Role-play simulation is strongly experiential which challenges learners both logically and emotionally. The 
situation is purposely messy or ill-defined; the problems and their answers buried within a range of personalities 
and their private agendas which have to be attended to before logical, well-informed solutions can be found. This 
mirrors more exactly the problematic situations that our learners will find themselves in when they join the work 
world.” 
Gillian Ladousse: “When students assume “a role”, they play a part (either their own or somebody else’s) in a 
specific situation. Play means that the role is taken on in a safe environment in which students are as initiative and 
playful as possible” 
Roger Gower and Steve Walter: “Role play is when students play the parts of the other people in a situation. 
It’s unscripted, although general ideas about what they are going to say might be prepared beforehand.”  
Adrian  Deffoe  in  his  book  “Teach  English”  gives  such  explanation:  “Role  play  is  therefore  a  classroom 
activity which gives the students an opportunity to practice the language, the aspects of role behavior, and the 
actual roles may be need outside the classroom.” 
“In a role play students take on the role of another person – a waiter, an adult, even a Martian or a monster. 
Often the situation is given (e.g. “You are in a restaurant. Order a meal.”)and perhaps some ideas of what to say. 
Role-play is a popular method in language-learning classroom for a number of reasons. Students of this age find it 
fun and quite students are often found to speak more openly in a ‘role’. In a role-play students are encouraged to 
use communication creatively and imaginatively and they get an opportunity to use language from ‘outside’ the 
classroom.”[7]  
Finally I can say that role- play is an activity which helps to develop students’ speech ability with the help of 
which students must be able to improvise and reproduce real, practical daily life speech. We know role-playing is 
fun, educational and entertaining and students like learn to speak with the help of role – play. 
 
1.  Brammer, M., and Sawyer-Laucanno, C. S., Business and industry: specific purposes of language training, New York: 
Newbury House, 1999, p. 210, pp. 143-150. 
2.  Burns, A. C., and Gentry, J. W., Motivating students to engage in experiential learning: a tension-to-learn theory, 29, 
2008, p. 300, pp. 133-151. 
3.  Jaworski, A. and Coupland, N. , The Discourse Reader.London: Routledge, 1999, p. 456, pp. 236-259. 
4.  Andrew Rilstone, "Role-Playing Games: An Overview" 1994, Inter Action, p21 
5.  World English Dictionary Bloomsbury Publishing Plc. 1999. 
6.  Longman Dictionary of Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics. J.C Richards, John Platt, Heidi Platt,p.426 
7.  Cambridge English for Schools. A to Z Methodology. 2000 pp56-59. 

Абай атындағы ҚазҰПУ-нің Хабаршысы, «Педагогика ғылымдары» сериясы, №3(47), 2015 г. 
65 

1   ...   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   ...   49


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал