Issn 2306-7365 1996 жылдың қарашасынан бастап екі айда бір рет шығады



жүктеу 6.24 Kb.

бет20/28
Дата09.01.2017
өлшемі6.24 Kb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   28

b)  Berendeis  and  their 
settlements 
in 
Hungary, 
Slovakia, 
Romania 
and 
Bulgaria: 
Although 
the 
Berendeis 
followed  the  Pechenegs  and  the 
Uzes  and  crossed  the  Danube  to 
enter  Hungary,  the  majority  of 
them  perished  due  to  the  severe 
cold  and  starvation  like  the  Uzes 
[4, p. 11]. 
While  the  Berendeis  seem  to 
have acted together with the Uzes 
in  Kievan  Russia,  they  are 
observed to be in alliance with the 
Pechenegs  in  Hungary.  However, 
the penetration of the Berendeis in 
Hungary  remained  only  limited. 
Rasovsky 
claims 
that 
the 
Berendeis 
entered 
Hungary 
independently  from,  and  earlier 
than the Pechenegs [4, p. 12].      
The  name  Berendei  is  observed  as  Berény,  Berencs  or  Berend  in  the 
Hungarian sources and Hungarian place names. Especially the word “Berend” has 
been identified with the name Berendei in the Russian annals [29]; and this led the 
Russian linguists to claim that the name Berény may have derived from the name 
Berendi  in  the  Russian  chronicles.  The  most  important  detail  at  this  point  is  that 
this  tribe  has  two  names  in  Hungary,  like  also  in  Russia:  In  Russia,  they  were 
called  the  Berendeis  and  the  Berendich;  and  in  Hungary,  they  were  called  the 
Berénd  and  Beréncs.  Rasovsky  states  that  Berény,  Berencs  or  Berend  does  not 
carry any particular significance [4, p. 33-34].      
While  we  can  find  information  in  the  Russian  annals  about  the  Berendeis  in 
                                      А.ЯСАУИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТІНІҢ ХАБАРШЫСЫ, №1, 2013 
An example of the Hungarian chronicles: the Pictum 
Kronigi 

170 
 
Russia, we also find information about the Berendeis in Hungary in  the  sources of  
the Hungarian State, the gramota (documents). In these documents, the Berendeis 
are not mentioned by their own names, but generally included within the Turkish 
population in Hungary. Especially the documents written at the time of King André 
II (1205-1235) contain more information about them [4, p. 50].   The settlements of 
the Berendeis are observed fairly often in Hungary. They are located at the eastern 
border  of  Hungary  and  especially  in  Slovakia.  Regarding  the  traces  of  the 
Berendeis settlements, it can be concluded that they entered Hungary crossing the 
southern part of the Carpathian Mountains and settled at the northern and eastern 
borders of Hungary.  
Rasovsky has described the settlements of the Berendeis, some of which have 
reached  our  time  and  show  their  existence  in  Hungary,  Slovakia,  Bulgaria  and 
Romania within the course of history, as follows (In his article, Rasovsky has said 
the last word in this subject and listed the names of these places in detail. However, 
we shall only give some of these names):   
The Berendeis have settled between Vag and Moravia in Slovakia and became 
an  integral  part  of  the  defence  system  of  Vag.  To  give  a  few  examples  of  the 
settlements in Slovakia: Berencsbukócz (in Slovak: Bukovec) in the Myjava region 
which  has  reached  our  day;  and,  as  we  approach  Brezová,  Berencsváralja  (in 
Slovak:  Podbranc)  among  the  Nitransk  villages  in  the  Myavsk  region.  After 
passing  these,  there  is  also  Berencsróna  (in  Slovak:  Rovensko)  at  the  Senitsk 
region [4, p. 25].       
Slovak scientists have also researched the roots of the word Berench in Slovak 
and  suggested  the  Slavic  word  “brana”  meaning  “door”  as  its  origin  [30].      
Hungarian scientists also claim that the old Slavic word of brana has passed to the 
Hungarian  language  in  the  form  of  borona;  the  Slovak  word  of  branc  was 
transformed  into  barancs  in  Hungarian;  and  eventually  the  Slovak  word  Berenc 
turned into Berencs in Hungarian [4, p. 34].       
The existence of a Berend village in 1463 is related in the area of Satmar in 
the Satmarsk region, westwards from Szinyér-Váralja, around Nagy-Bánya, which 
was part of Hungary in the XV century, although it lies in  Romania today. In the 
vicinity  of  this  place, there  was  the  Berendmező  (mező  =  Hungarian  for  “field”) 
village in 1490, which has become the Berencze (Berenczét) village today. And in 
the  west  of  Nagy-Bánya,  around  Kővárkőlcse  within  the  ancient  Satmar  region, 
eastwards  in  Besterts-Nasod,  there  was  the  village  of  Berendest  or  Berenfalia. 
South-westwards from here, near Kolozsvár, a village named Berend is mentioned 
to have existed between the years 1423-1501. In the Arad County, in Feher-Körös 
near Borosjenő, we come across Berendia, which is one of the Valash villages that 
stood until today. Southwards from there, in the Hodos fortress in the Temesh and 
Krasov regions, the name of the Berendefalva village is mentioned in 1471. 
In 1283, near River Nitra, a place called “Berench” was mentioned to exist. It 
seems like today’s Berenc Village should have been located in front of the city of 
Nitra  and  on  the  bank  of  River  Nitra.  Also  in  the  vicinity  of  Toplocany  at  the 
crossing of the Bebrava and Nitritsa regions, a village named Berenc is related in 
  А.ЯСАУИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТІНІҢ ХАБАРШЫСЫ, №1, 2013 

171 
 
the sources of the year 1244.  
A  Berente  village  is  also  mentioned  in  1454  among  other  Pecheneg 
settlements  in  the  Bukov  Mountains  (within  the  borders  of  the  Czech  Republic 
today), on the Barsod region near the Slan (Shayo) River. 
Remains  of  Berendei  settlements  have  been  observed  around  the  Pecheneg 
tribes  near  Drava  at  the  southern  border  of  Hungary:  mentioned  in  the  records 
entered  between  1347  and  1493,  Berench  then  belonged  to  the  Domba  tribe. 
Today, this region has been evacuated north-westwards from Szigetvar. 
 On  the  western  border,  near  Zalalővő  (north-eastwards),  the  Berend 
settlement  took  place  between  the  years  1332-1513.  There  are  direct  records 
indicating  that  wealthy  landlords  from  the  Balaja  and  Petra  Berendeis  were  in 
possession  of  this  area  in  1513.  Today,  this  population  are  named  as  Börönd.  A 
place  called  Beren  (d)  is  mentioned  in  1256,  which  was  located  a  little  more 
westwards,  in  the  north  of  Lake  Balaton,  near  the  city  of  Devescer  (south-
eastwards), and Bessenyő-Major, the Pecheneg settlement in this area.  
Finally,  in  the  Dör  region,  there  is  the  Berenth  settlement  mentioned  in  the 
records from 1500.  
Besides  the  above-mentioned  Turkic  populations,  there  was  also  another 
population  in  Hungary  located  further  away  from  the  border  areas  and  inside  the 
country,  living  in  the  comprehensive  line  of  the  Pecheneg  settlements  and  in 
certain  Berendei  settlements.  They  were  divided  into  a  few  of  groups:  Fehervar-
Toln or Sarviza, Kemey, Western Körös, Chanad (or more precisely, Arank). 
The traces of the Berendei were also observed in the inner parts of Hungary, 
where the Pechenegs had settled in Sarviza. Near Hőgyécz in the region of Toln, 
there  was  the  terra  Berencz  (1305);  while  Berenthe  recorded  in  1325-1487  took 
place at the northern part of the Fehervar area, in the Al- and Fel-Csut regions. In 
these regions, great families were named Berencze or Berentei [4, p. 35-45].   
In his study, Rasovksy has listed the people with the names Berend, Berench, 
Berencze,  etc.  he  came  across  in  the  sources  as  best  a  she  could.  Marton’s  son 
Berend  who  rescued  King  Charles  (Karl)  I  in  1330;  Thoma  de  Berench  (1287), 
Demetrius Niger de Berench and Erdeus de Berench (1298), Laurentius de Berench 
(1244),  Bened.  Berenche  (1337)  and  Gallus  de  Berend  (1429)  are  some  of  these 
names [4, p. 41-42].   
L.Rásonyi  also  mentions  two  Hungarian  villages  called  Börgönd  and 
Bergengye in the Fehervar and Baran regions, and links these names to Bergen, a 
personal name in Turkish, which gave rise to the Hungarian personal name Beren. 
He  also  derives  the  names  Berény,  Berencs  and  Berend  from  Beren.  In  this 
interesting article about the name Bergen, the author has not established any links 
with the Russian Berendei and Berény [31].    
Hungarian Turkologist Gy. Németh also agrees that the personal name Berény 
is definitely of Turkish origin [32]. 
           
From Rasovsky’s works, who has located the Berendi settlements in Hungary 
with  their  approximate  location,  if  not  exactly;  we  may  conclude  that  their 
                                      А.ЯСАУИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТІНІҢ ХАБАРШЫСЫ, №1, 2013 

172 
 
settlements were spread on larger areas, especially in the X-XII centuries.  
However,  finding  out  this  kind  of  information  and  comparing  these  with  the 
coming eras is rather difficult.  
We  also  hear  the  name  Berendi  in  Bulgaria.  According  to  this  information, 
there were two villages in the Tsaribroda and Breznika regions between the cities 
of Sofia and Niš in Bulgaria. The name of the ruler of Moldova between 1438 and 
1142 was also Berindey (Beryndej) [33].   
 
The settlements of the Berendei Tribe were not always named after the tribes 
(Berencz), but generally after the names of the kinsfolk, families, or even personal 
names independently from the geography they lived in. Unfortunately this situation 
hinders  the  identification  of  the  numerous  settlements  which  are  doubtlessly  of 
Turkic origin. The records focus on this point beginning from the XIV century. If 
these settlements belong to the Pechenegs, Uzes or the Berendeis; or to the Cumans 
who  have  settled  here  later  is  yet  to  be  cleared.  It  seems  like  the  Berendei 
settlements  in  Hungary  first  started  when  the  Uzes  and  the  Berendeis  have 
followed  the  large  mass  of  the  Pechenegs  and  crossed  the  northern  and  southern 
parts of the Carpathian Mountains to arrive and settle in places like Kemei, Kőrős, 
and  probably  also  Aran.  Thus,  they  were  settled  on  the  borders  of  Hungary  and 
stayed there forever after. However, these settlers were gradually employed by the 
Hungarian State to perform certain services. 
  The Turkish  settlements  in  Hungary  were  founded with the active  initiative 
of the Hungarian State. Most probably, they were captured by the Hungarians and 
resettled  in  various  places  in  line  with  the  strategical  benefits  of  the  state.  These 
settlements  have  been  formed  as  Turkish  settlements  in  the  area  surrounded  by 
Slovakia in the north, Layta-Raba and Drava in the west, and the banks of Danube 
in  the  south.  These  settlements  were  also  observed  in  the  inland,  in  Sarvisa 
(Szekesfehervar).  
  We  can  claim  that  the  Turkic  tribes  were  clearly  forced  to  settle  in  these 
areas,  since  these  regions  of  the  countries  were  absolutely  inappropriate  for  the 
lifestyle of the Turks in terms of the geographical conditions. For instance, neither 
the mountainous and forested western part of Slovakia, nor the estuaries on these 
lands  were  suitable  for  them  to  continue  their  half-nomadic  lifestyle.  Only  in 
Slovakia,  we  come  across  rare  Pecheneg-Berendei  settlements  and  posts  on  the 
banks of certain rivers and forested areas [4, p. 42].    
  Limited information is available in the Hungarian sources about the political 
role  these Turkic  settlers  played  in  Hungary.  All  we know  is  that the Turks  were 
settled in large groups in various parts of Hungary due the continuing intense raids 
form across the border. Since these settlers have outstanding military abilities, they 
were  used  as  mercenaries  during  the  era  as  the  Hungarian  State  was  gaining  in 
strength.  However,  since  the  Turkic  population  in  Hungary  was  ruled  directly  by 
their  own  chieftains,  as  the  Hungarian  State  grew  stronger  in  the  XII-XIII 
centuries,  the  rulers  of  the  Hungarian  State  decided  to  gradually  decrease  the 
number  of  these  Turkic  settlers  and  to  dissolve  their  national  identity  in  order  to 
assimilate them. After this resolution was put in action, the Turkic settlers and the 
  А.ЯСАУИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТІНІҢ ХАБАРШЫСЫ, №1, 2013 

173 
 
kinsfolk adhering to their chieftains have been assimilated as Hungarians; and they  
soon  became  an  indispensable  military  force  better  organized  than  before,  even 
though they were smaller in number. 
Since  the  Berendeis  moved  together  both  with  the  Uzes  and  the  Pechenegs, 
the  relics  excavated  from  their  graves  in  the  steppes  of  Eastern  Europe  carry  the 
features  of the  graves  of  both  the  Uzes  and  the  Pechenegs.  Therefore,  they  could 
not  be  evaluated  separately  by  the  archaeologists.  The  conclusions  reached  from 
these  graves  can  be  summarized  as  follows:  These  graves  that  belong  to  the  IX-
XIII  centuries  can  be  divided  in  two  groups.  The  first  group  consists  of  shallow 
earthen graves located under relatively small cairns or within the bastions of older 
cairns. The heads of the bodies laid in the supine position are directed towards the 
west. On the left side of the body, on the floor of the grave, or in a special place, 
the head and leg bones of a horse - or more probably - the body of a horse buried in 
his skin and lying in the anatomical position are observed. The most typical relics 
found  together  with  these  are  iron  bridles  (non-twisted  bridles)  and  breechings 
made of iron or bone to attach the bridle, which sometimes had fixed loops at the 
edges.  Other  relics  among  the  objects  related  to  harnesses  are  oval  stirrups  with 
foothold, and pieces of harness formed to attach the buckles of the saddle girths to 
both sides. The weapons found include slightly curved swords, sometimes elliptic 
cross  knives  made  of  iron,  a  pair  of  attachments  made  of  bones  for  the  bow  and 
rarely, a couple of arrowheads left within the quiver. The jewellery found includes 
fibulae in the shape of crosses and heraldry in the shape of sliced leaves adorned 
with symbols of the tree of life, or a bird with spread wings. Pletnëva claims that 
these belong to the Pechenegs [34, p. 153].   
The graves constituting the second group are earthen graves where the head of 
the body is turned westwards under the bastions of the cairns and certain parts of a 
horse  are  observed  to  be  buried  with  the  body.  The  differential  characteristic  of 
these graves is the woodwork and the pavement at the bottom of the grave [34, p. 
165].   
Conclusion:                                                              
As  we  see, the  Berendeis were an  ancient Turkic  tribe  who settled in  Russia 
and Hungary and gained a considerable power in these countries during the X-XIII 
centuries.  They  thus  became  an  integral  part  of  the  border  defence  systems  and 
undertook  the  protection  of  the  borders  of  the  strategic  areas  on  behalf  of  these 
countries. While their capital in Hungary was Fehervar, they were settled along the 
roads extending northwards from Kiev in Russia. 
Although the Berendeis could not act independently from the Pechenegs either 
in  Kievan  Russia  or  in  Hungary,  their  entrance  to  both  countries  occurred 
independently  from  them  and  at  an  earlier  time  point.  These  settlements  helped 
them  to  culturally  influence  both  the  Russians  and  the  Hungarians.  The  most 
important  interaction  occurred  especially  on  the  point  of  the  military  tactics  and 
horsemanship.  Their  habits  and  jewellery  were  also  bought  and  used  by  the 
Russians. 
                                      А.ЯСАУИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТІНІҢ ХАБАРШЫСЫ, №1, 2013 

174 
 
Unfortunately, settling on 
Russian, Slovak, Hungarian and Romanian territories
 
led  them  to  intermingle  with  the  local  people  in  time,  paving  the  way  for  their 
assimilation and the dissolution of their national identity. 
 
KAYNAKÇA 
1.Yücel  M.U.  İlk  Rusya  Yıllıklarına  Göre  Türkler.  –Ankara,  2007.  In  this  study, 
concise information has been given about the Berendeis and all the information on the 
Berendeis in the Russian annals has been related. 
2.For  valuable  analyses  on  the  Turkic  origins  of  the  Berendeis,  please  refer  to  J. 
Marquart, “Ueber das Volkstum der Komanen”,  Osttürkische Dialektstudien. –Berlin, 
l924. –P.28,157.     
3.Golubovskiy,  Peçenegi,  Torki,  Polovtsı  do  Naşestviya  Tatar.  //  Universitetskiye 
Izvestiya. –No.1. –Kiev, 1883-1884. P.432. 
4.Rasovsky  D.A.  “Peçenegi,  Torki  ve  Berendi  Ha  Rus  i  Ugrii”,  Seminarium 
Kondakovianum VI. –Prag, 1933. –P. 11. 
5.Jirecek C. Einige Bemerkungen über die Überreste der Petschenegen und Kumanen, 
sowie  über  die  Völkerschaften  der  sogenannten  Gagauzi  und  Surguci  im  heutigen 
Bulgarien. –Sitzungsber., 1889. –P.6. 
6.Rasonyi  L.  Doğu  Avrupa’da  Türklük,  /Turk.  Tr.  by  Yusuf  Gedikli/,  Selenge 
Yayınları. –Istanbul, 2006. –P.184. 
7.Batur  A.  who  translated  Artamonov’s  work  into  Turkish,    has  translated  the  name 
Berendei  as  Barani  or  Bayandur  in  order  to  link  them  to  the  Bayındır  tribe,  which  is 
considered as one of the 24 Oguz tribes. 
8.Artamonov M.I. Hazar Tarihi, / Turk. Tr. by A.Batur/. Selenge Yayınları. –Istanbul, 
2004. –P.538. 
9.Kafesoğlu, Türk Milli Kültürü. –Istanbul, l992. –P.182. 
10.Kurat  A.N.  IV-XVIII  Yüzyıllarda  Karadeniz  Kuzeyindeki  Türk  Kavimleri  ve 
Devletleri. –Ankara, l972. –P.68. 
11.Aristov N.A. Jıvaya Starina, 1896. –Vıp III-IV. –P.310-311. 
12.Sobolevsky A.I. Rusyasko-Skifskih Etyudah, Izb. Otd. Rusyask. Yaz. I Slov. Akad. 
Nauk, 1921. –XVI. –P. 10. 
13.Parhomenko  V.  “Çorni  Klobuki”,  Shidniy  Sbit.  –No.  5.  –Harkov,  1928.  –P.  244-
245. 
14.Ràsonyi L.  “Der Volksname Berendey”, Seminarium Kondokovianum VI. –1935. –
P.219-226. 
15.Baskakov  A.N.  Turkskaya  Leksika  v  Slove  o  Polku  Igoreve.  –  Moskva,  1985.  –P. 
63. 
16.Brutkuz  J.  “Eski  Kiev’in  Türk  Hazar  Menşei”.  /  Turk.  Tr.  by  Halil  İnalcık-  İkbal 
Berk/, A.Ü.DTCF, C.IV/3. –Mart-Nisan, 1946. –P.351. 
17.Tatishev  V.N.  Istorya  Rossiyskaya.  –II,  1768.  –P.79:  Re-printed  in  2005. 
18.Downloadable from: http:az.ib.ru/t/tatishew_w_n 
Ibid. 
19.Rasovsky,  “Eski  Rus  Tarihinde  Kara-Kalpakların  Rolü”.  /Turk.  Tr.  by  H.Orkin/, 
Ülkü, C.X. –P.57, 1937. –P. 252-253. 
20.Among  the  Russian  historians,  M.  Pogodin  studied  the  Berendeis  in  the  Russian 
annals. Cf. M. Pogodina,  Issledovaniya,  Zamiçaniya i  Lektsi o Ruskoy Istorii, C.V, –
Moskva, 
l857. 
Downloaded 
from 
http://krotov.info/lib_sec/16_p/og/odin 
on 
25.02.2012.  
  А.ЯСАУИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТІНІҢ ХАБАРШЫСЫ, №1, 2013 

175 
 
 
21.Kossanyi  V.  “XI-XII.nci  Asırlarda  Uzlar  ve  Komanlar’ın  Tarihine  Dâir”, 
/Türk.Terc., Hamit Koşay/, Belleten. –C.VIII. –P.29, 1944. –P.129. 
22.Gumilev  L.N.  Muhayyel  Hükümdarlığın  İzinde,  /Türk.Terc.  A.Batur/,  Selenge 
Yayınları. –Istanbul, 2003. –P.367. 
23.Kostomarov  N.I.  İstoriçeskiye  Moonografii  i  İssledovaniya.  –Sant-Peterburg,  l903. 
–P.112. 
24.Ed. Semenov-Tyan-Shanskagy. Rossiya. –Sankt-Peterburg, 1899. –I. –P. 271. 
25.Spitsin  A.A.  Koçevniçeskiy  Kurgan  Bliz  Gor.  Yureva  Polskago  //  Izvestiya  Imp. 
Arheologiç. Komissii, 15. Ed., 1905. –P. 78-83. 
26.Gumilev  L.N.  Eski  Ruslar  ve  BüyükBozkır  Halkları.  /  Turk.  Tr.  by  A.Batur/.  –
Istanbul, 2003. –P.148. 
27.Kostomarov N. Istoriçeskiya Monografii i Izsledovaniya. –SPB, 1872. –I. –P. 189. 
28.Dal V. Slovar Jivago VelikoRusyaskago Yazıka, (the item “berendeyka”). 
29.Kossányi B. “Az úzok és  Kománok tőrténetéhez a XI-XII.  Században” (History of 
the  Uzes  and  the  Cumans  during  the  XI-XII.  centuries).  –Századok,  1924.  –P.529. 
However, Kossányi only points out the name Berend, but does not mention the name 
Bereny. 
30.Chaloupecky V., Staré Slovensko V. –Brastilave, 1923. –P. 72. 
31.Rásonyi Seminarium. Der Volksanme Berendey. –P.223. 
32.Németh Gy. “Maklar, Magyar Nvelv, C.XXVII, l937. –P. 147. 
33.Jirecek, a.g.e. –P. 6-7. 
34.Pletnëva S.A. “Peçenegi,  Torki i Polovtsi  v Yujno-Russkih  Stepah”,  MIA. –No.62, 
l958. –P.153. 
 
ТҮЙІНДЕМЕ 
Мақалада  Қара  теңізден  солтүстікке  қарай  орналасқан  берендейлер  түркі  тайпасының 
тарихы,  оның  сол  уақыттағы  түрлі  жағдайлардағы  орны,  мемлекеттер  арасындағы  өзара 
қарым-қатынастардағы саяси рөлі және одан әрі тайпа ретінде жойылуы сөз болады. 
(Муала  Юди  Южел.  Қара  теңізден  Солтүстікке  дейін  кеңінен  танымал  берендей  түркі 
тайпасы) 
 
РЕЗЮМЕ 
В данной статье рассматривается история тюрского племени берендей, распологавшегося 
к северу от Черного моря, его место в различных событиях того времени, политическая роль во 
взаимоотношениях между государствами и дальнейшее исчезновение как племени.  
(Муала  Юди  Южел.  Тюрское  племя  берендей,  распологавшееся  к  северу  от  Черного 
моря) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
А.ЯСАУИ УНИВЕРСИТЕТІНІҢ ХАБАРШЫСЫ, №1, 2013 

176 
 
 
 
   ӘОЖ 928:844.1 
М.М.ТАСТАНБЕКОВ 
тарих ғылымдарының кандидаты, доцент 
А.Ясауи атындағы ХҚТУ 
 

1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   28


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал