Хабаршы вестник «Педагогика ғылымдары»


THE ETHICS OF TRANSLATING AND INTERPRETING



жүктеу 5.1 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
бет14/46
Дата04.05.2017
өлшемі5.1 Kb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   46

THE ETHICS OF TRANSLATING AND INTERPRETING 
 
А.МЖалалова – аға оқытушы, 
Н.Юсупова – 1-курс магистранты, 
Абай атындағы ҚазҰПУ, магистратура және PhD докторантура институты 
 
Түйін 
Мақаланың  басты  мәселесі  -  ауызша  және  жазбаша  аударманың  этикалық  нормалары.  Барлық  мәдениетті 
қоғамда  аудармашылардың  жұмыс  барысында,  ұжымда  жалпы  және  іскерлік  этиканы  ұстану  дағдысы  жайлы 
кеңінен сипатталады.  
 
Резюме 
В  данной  статье  рассматриваются  главные  нормы  этики  перевода,  как  и  письменного  так  и  устного.  Как  и  в 
любой  другой  сфере,  в переводе  существует  своя  профессиональная  этика,  которая  включает  в себя  элементы 
деловой и общей этики, принятой в любом культурном обществе.  

Вестник КазНПУ им. Абая, серия «Педагогические науки», №3(39), 2013 г. 
90 
"After  the  “space”,  translation  and  interpreting  are  the  most  complex  and  unknown  phenomenon,"  says  the 
famous  linguist  S.  G.  Barkhudarov,  quoting  the  English  philosopher  Rogers.[1]  Language,  as  we  know, is  the 
most  important  means  of  human  communication,  through  which  people  exchange  thoughts  and  mutual 
understanding.  Communication  between  people  who  speak  different  languages  can  be  realized  in    two  ways: 
orally and in writing. If communicators speak  in the same language, the communication takes place directly, but 
when  people  speak  different  languages,  direct  communication  becomes  impossible  Translation,  therefore,  is  an 
important  tool,  ensuring  the  fulfillment  of  its  communicative  function  of  language  in  those  cases  where  people 
express  in different languages. Translation plays an important role in exchanging ideas between different peoples 
and serves to spread cultural treasures in modern world, there are  international contacts of  different fields: culture 
and  business,  science  and  sports,  of  course,  tourism.  On  the  one  hand,  translating  promotes  interest  in  the 
language of the "masses." On the other there are more and more increasing demands for professional translators. 
Translators needed everywhere: talks and conferences, exhibitions and seminars, travel groups and overseas tours. 
Of course, the most demand of professionals  is in the major European languages  like English, German, French, 
Spanish, Italian, etc.  
What does translation mean? At first side - it's simple. What was said in the original text, we should  present in 
another  language.  But  there  is  an  old  anecdote  about  a  seminarian  who  had  to  translate  the  Latin  sentence 
«Spiritus quidem promptus est, caro autem infirma». This is the Gospel saying "The spirit indeed is willing, but 
the flesh is weak" which seminarian translated as  "Alcohol is good, but the meat is  addled ."And this translation 
is right in the sense that each of the words translated correctly in grammatical and lexical way. Only the meaning 
of the original text, it certainly is not right.  
And Boris Pasternak in the "Comments to the translations of Shakespeare," says that "... the translation must 
give the impression of life, not literature."At a conference on the problems of translation speaker began his speech 
as  follows:  "Art  is  big  problem  in  general.  The  art  of  translation  is  generally  difficult  problem.  "  And  so,  the 
difficulties  faced  by  the  translator,    are  numerous.  And  the  first  of  them  -  the  understanding  of  the  original. 
Particular  difficulties  arise  when  source  and  target  languages  belong  to  different  cultures.  For  example,  if 
translator is European person who tries translate somebody or something originally from Arabic countries or Asia. 
We have different cultures and traditions, so usually we can make mistake when we don’t understand them. And it 
is not because of less of knowledge, it is because of different mentality and of course culture. 
After saying a few words about culture and art of translating we can easily transfer to the ethics of translating 
which  is  also  very  interesting  issue  in  our  modern  society.  As  in  any  other  field,  the  translation  has  its  own 
professional  ethics,  which  includes  elements  of  the  business  and  general  ethics,  adopted  in  any  polite  society. 
However,  the  conversion  of  the  some  specific  features  that  are  behind  the  scenes  must  follow  every  good 
professional.  The  professional  career  of  the  interpreter  is  based  on  interpersonal  communication  that  occurs 
between  the  translator  and  the  client,  and  between  colleagues.  That  is  why  it  is  important  to  carry  out  ethical 
standards that exist in this field. At first, the ethics focuses on creating a positive image of the client interpreter. 
After all, if the employee is remembered in positive sides to the employer, it means that next time this client will 
work  again  with  this  translator  or  will  need  the  services  of  the  firm.  This  creates  not  only  the  reputation  of  the 
individual worker, but also the company as a whole.[2] 
Ethics is the art of conduct. Situational rules  of  conduct require full adaptation  of translator to a situation  in 
which he finds himself. The great scientist or a movie star can be dressed provocatively or behave inappropriately 
but translator can not. Because, in the role of the translator should be visible as a person, not to divert the attention, 
his task is give right and accurate information. Therefore, he should be dressed neatly and as applicable, to comply 
with  the  generally  accepted  rules  of  decency.  He  violates  them  only  if  they  are  incompatible  with  its  primary 
professional role in the situation. For example, if he wants to transfer during the dinner, it is not necessary to eat 
and drink. Backstage at communicating translator can not participate in the conversation as an equal interlocutor; 
otherwise it will distort the information source and lose its reliability as a translator. So his task is to adapt, but to 
work. 
Ethics of translators is not much different from the ethics of interpersonal communication. General rules to be 
followed  by  a  person  working  in  this  field,  are  confidentiality,  respect  for  the  client  and  his  or  her  wishes,  and 
commitment. This does not mean that you need throughout and fully agree with the customer, but translator must 
prove his correctness in very polite and ethical way. Correct relation to the customer and showing politeness and 
friendliness are  more about  human  ethics,  which should be  not  only  in  work but also  in  life.  However, another 
important rule of professional activity is the accuracy of information. The point is that the information provided by 
the  client  should  not  get  to  a  third  person  without  the  agreement  of  the  customer.  This  applies  both  to  the 
interpretation and written way of translation. In some cases, an interpreter can be invited to business conversations 

Абай атындағы ҚазҰПУ-нің Хабаршысы, «Педагогика ғылымдары» сериясы, №3(39), 2013 г. 
91 
and meeting. And interpreter must keep that information which he got there. Otherwise, it can lead to variety of 
negative consequences, including the entering of an interpreter in the black list, and then it will be difficult to find 
a  job  in  this  field.  Often  translators  work  with  the  citizens  of  other  countries,  and  the  impression  left  by  one 
person, can automatically move to the treatment of all his fellow citizens, which is another good reason to show 
their best side. Not only professional (although they are important), but also the personal qualities of an interpreter 
which influence the level of his relationship with the customer. However, do not be too polite, it is important to 
maintain the level of self-esteem in communication with the client.[3] 
A professional translator or interpreter does not simply translate words from one language to another. His duty 
is to interpret and connect ideas from  one  culture to another. Faithfully conveying  ideas requires translators and 
interpreters to express appropriate intonation and inflection and to properly transmit the concepts and inferences 
of the speaker to the listener (interpreter) or the writer to the reader (translator). Typically, translators render in one 
direction  while  interpreters  alternate  between  two  languages.  Professional  translators  and  interpreters  need 
comprehensive mastery of grammar, syntax and vocabulary of both the source and target languages, and in-depth 
understanding of cultural norms. Additionally,  extensive diverse  general knowledge  increases the translator’s or 
interpreter's understanding and skill. 
Interpreters must take care of their health because his physical condition affects the quality of the translation. 
Translator has the right to react emotionally to the individual defects in speech and speaker should not play them, 
it is oriented to the interpretation given to the oral version of the literary standard language translation. On his lack 
of  competence  translator  must  immediately  signal,  and  noticed  for  a  correct  mistakes  and  not  hide,  it  is  a 
guarantee of high quality translation and credibility of others. In translation the translator must follow its design to 
ensure correct attitude towards the customer. The translator is not the part of conversation or  the opponent client , 
this implies that the text for translation untouchable. 
A faithful interpretation or translation conveys the message the speaker or writer intends. A thorough rendering 
of the source language message considers linguistic variations, tone and the spirit of the message without omitting 
or  altering  statements  or  adding  unsolicited  explanations.  A  transliteration  (literal  word-for-word  translation), 
however, may not convey the message or make sense, particularly in the use of idioms. In that case, substitute an 
appropriate, equivalent cultural idiom to maintain the spirit of the message. 
Following  ethical  standards  will  not  only  be  successful  in  the  field  of  translation,  but  also  leave  a  positive 
impression  on  people  you  work  with,  which  in  itself  is  important.  Translation  etiquette  is  a  set  of  written  and 
unwritten  rules  of  behavior  of  interpreter  in  the  discharge  of  his  professional  duties,  and  in  relations  with 
colleagues, customers, translation and translation agencies. [4] 
The total translational etiquette includes approximately the following: 
- The translations in time with proper quality 
- Fair treatment of all its responsibilities  
- Punctuality (Interpretation) 
- Polite and correct relations with all participants of the translated event 
These rules are very similar to the rules of conduct with clients and translators and translation agencies. There 
are  much  information  about  the  ethics  of  translator  and  interpreter.  Now  I’m  going  to  give  you  some  practical 
advices from my own experience. What the translator should not allow in any case? 
Do not: 
• demonstrate your ignorance, ignorance of the issue, lack of preparedness, to argue in your defense; 
• to attract too much attention, to behave carelessly or too emotional 
•  engage  in private conversations  with the  negotiators (especially  on sensitive  issues regarding the  company 
and employees); 
• express their attitude to translate the statements, even if they are controversial; 
•  interrupt  and  supplement  a  fellow  translator,  you  are  working  in  pairs,  allowed  intervention  only  if  a 
colleague is clearly unable to cope with the translation; 
• transfer in the third person: "He said that ..." - this is a big mistake; 
• distracted by extraneous talking on a cell phone (it must be turned off); 
• wear too bright or informal clothing to meetings and conversations, it is recommended classical style. 
 
1.  S. G. Barkhudarov //“Ethics of translation and interpreting’’, p.22 
2.  Sandra Bermann & Michael Wood Nation// Language, and the Ethics of Translation р.37 
3.  Aлексеева  И.  С.//  Профессиональное  обучение  переводчика:  Учебное  пособие  по  устному  и  письменному 
переводу для переводчиков и преподавателей. — СПб.: Издательство «Союз», 2001, стр 18 
4.  Danilo Noguira, Kelly Semelini //   “The ethics of translator”.  Translation Journal, 2005,pages 51-53. 

Вестник КазНПУ им. Абая, серия «Педагогические науки», №3(39), 2013 г. 
92 
TEACHING PHILOSOPHY 
 
Ч.Н. Асаналиева – Ж.Баласагын атындагы Кыргыз Улуттук Университетинин Педагогикалык 
Кадрларды максаттуу даярдоо Институтунун агаокутуучусу.Четтил дерциклдык 
комиссиясынынжетекчиси 
 
Teaching is a lifelong learning process of learning about new philosophies and new strategies, learning from 
the  parents  and  community,  learning  from  colleagues,  and  especially  learning  from  the  children.  The  teaching 
philosophy is becoming a more common part of academic life for both faculty and graduate students. A teaching 
philosophy  is  a  self-reflective  statement  of  teacher’s  beliefs  about  teaching  and  learning.  In  addition  to  general 
comments, your teaching philosophy should discuss how you put your beliefs into practice by including concrete 
examples of what you do or anticipate doing in the classroom. The teaching philosophy is a document in progress. 
As  your teaching changes and  your professional  identity grows,  your teaching philosophy  will also change and 
grow.  
I believe that most  of us have  our own teaching philosophy.  As a teacher, I have the utmost confidence that 
every individual is able to strive for success in their academic performance. In order to realize that, I should try 
my best to promote growth by employing creativity, stressing the importance of education as well as giving my 
students the freedom to think and discover knowledge. Moreover, I also appreciate that each different individual is 
unique  therefore  any  ideas,  opinions,  criticisms  and  suggestions  from  them  should  be  taken  into  consideration. 
Each student is a unique individual who needs a secure, caring, and stimulating atmosphere in which to grow and 
mature emotionally, intellectually, physically, and socially.  
Goal number one is to educate the students in my classes. I want them to learn the material of my courses in a 
permanent, long-lasting way 
I want to inspire students, to change their lives, so that they discover life paths that they had never considered 
before. This may seem arrogant and ambitious, but I’ve seen it happen 
I  relish  the  privilege  of  getting  to  know  the  students  in  my  classes,  to  talk  with  them,  to  visit,  to  joke,  to 
develop relationships and most importantly to become friends. Teaching a thrill!  
Teaching provides an opportunity for continual learning and growth. One of my hopes as a teacher is to instill 
a  love  of  learning  in  my  students,  as  I  share  my  own  passion  for  learning  with  them.  I  feel  there  is  a  need  for 
compassionate, strong, and dedicated individuals who are excited about working with children. In our competitive 
society it is important for students to not only receive a solid education, but to work with someone who is aware 
of and sensitive to their individual needs. I am such a person and will always strive to be the best teacher that I can 
be.  
I am learning. I learn something  new  with  every semester that I teach. I have  learned a lot in the time that I 
have been here, but I have also come to appreciate how much more I have to learn. I find teaching to be a constant 
challenge.  I  have  learned  that  there  is  no  “right  way”  to  teach  something,  because  every  group  of  students  is 
different. Sometimes a lesson which works with one group of students will fail miserably with another group of 
students,  and  so  I  simply  have  to  take  a  deep  breath  and  try  another  approach.  Thus,  I  think  that  perhaps  my 
greatest strength is my flexibility and my ongoing efforts to become a better teacher. As fundamental principle, I 
think that what I do in the classroom is far less important than what the students themselves do, in and out of class. 
The most important facets of my courses are what I require the students to do, the set of activities and assignments 
that I give to the students.  
When  I  first  started  teaching,  many  years  ago,  I  was  most  concerned  that  my  students  learned  the  things  I 
thought they needed to know, whether those were topics about English speaking countries culture, how to write 
persuasively, or the ins and outs of library research. Whether I was teaching skills or content, I believed my first 
responsibility was communicating information that I had already chosen. 
Over the years I experienced a series of realizations, some prompted by my students, others by circumstance, 
which have led me to my current approach to teaching. I also realized that my students would have to find their 
own  reasons  and  approaches,  in  their  own  lives,  to  pursue  scholarship.  Without  this  personal  motivation  and 
individual approach, no information I present, no skills I model  will be of any use to them. I began to focus on 
communicating  my  own  enthusiasm to  my students, so that  even  if they  did not absorb  every  detail I presented 
during class, they would be interested enough to work with me on finding the best learning process and to keep 
learning on their own.  
There are basic three-part processes: 
You will begin by generating ideas for your teaching philosophy based on your attitudes, values, and beliefs 
about teaching and learning.  

Абай атындағы ҚазҰПУ-нің Хабаршысы, «Педагогика ғылымдары» сериясы, №3(39), 2013 г. 
93 
You will organize your ideas and create a working draft. You'll also check to make sure that you've illustrated 
your personal beliefs with specific examples of classroom practice that take into account disciplinary contexts and 
constants.  
You  will  assess  your  first  draft,  comparing  it  to  a  rubric  –  a  set  of  guidelines  –  for  effective  teaching 
philosophies. Your assessment should point the way toward gaps in the essay or areas that need to be reworked 
during subsequent revisions.  
The pedagogical challenge of helping each student make an individual connection to writing is at the root of 
my  three  main  interests:  Multiple  Intelligence  Theory,  Web-supported  Instruction,  and  Inter-cultural 
communication.  Multiple  Intelligence  theory  posits  that  a  student's  preferred  medium  for  thinking  and 
communicating  is  the  best  through  which  to  introduce  new  skills  and  concepts,  and  it  tries  to  determine  how 
teachers  might identify and then use that medium  in the classroom. Computer technology can  make  non-textual 
material far easier to bring into a class, both for students and teachers, and its use has helped us see how Multiple 
Intelligence  theory  might  be  applied.  This  technology  can  further  allow  students  to  pursue  their  studies  more 
independently, setting their own pace and choosing their own path.  
Now, when I teach, I try not just to impart information and skills, but also enthusiasm for the subject and the 
process of studying. I aim to make my students aware that the challenges facing me as the teacher also face them 
when they write, or speak, or otherwise communicate in our class and in general. Taking this approach has led to 
more  productive  discussions  and  feedback  in  class  because  the  students  and  I  talk  explicitly  about  what  I  am 
trying to teach them and how that relates to the choices I have made in presenting material, creating assignments, 
and figuring grades. Talking about how an assignment is supposed to work and what skills it should help polish 
leads students to be more conscious of their own learning process. Students are then better able to identify their 
own difficulties with an assignment and suggest solutions. I also talk to students about why I teach certain ways of 
writing, or choose certain topics for assignments, so that they can see the context of an academic community in 
which  they  write.  The  students  further  learn  that  we  all  make  choices  when  communicating,  and  we  all  make 
interpretations  when listening  or viewing; they become active participants in learning and thus  more invested  in 
the outcome, and in continuing beyond the end of any one class. 
I try to teach each student as an individual, because each will have different needs in writing based in their own 
unique situation, and these are shaped by "intelligences," by cultural background, by the major they choose, and 
countless other factors. There is no one right approach for me to take as a teacher, or for them to take as writers. 
Instead, I focus on helping students identify and understand their own particular writing needs, and to find the best 
way in which to meet those needs. I believe that each child is a unique individual who needs a secure, caring, and 
stimulating atmosphere in which to grow and mature emotionally, intellectually, physically, and socially. It is my 
desire as a educator to help students meet their fullest potential in these areas by providing an environment that is 
safe, supports risk-taking, and invites a sharing of ideas.  
There are three elements which are conducive to establishing such an environment  
the teacher acting as a guide,  
allowing the child's natural curiosity to direct his/her learning, and  
promoting respect for all things and all people. 
When the teacher's role is to guide, providing access to information rather than acting as the primary source of 
information, the students' search for knowledge is met as they learn to find answers to their questions. For students 
to  construct  knowledge,  they  need  the  opportunity  to  discover  for  themselves  and  practice  skills  in  authentic 
situations. Providing students access to hands-on activities and allowing adequate time and space to use materials 
that  reinforce  the  lesson  being  studied  creates  an  opportunity  for  individual  discovery  and  construction  of 
knowledge to occur.  
Equally important to self-discovery is having the opportunity to study things that are meaningful and relevant 
to  one's  life  and  interests.  Developing  a  curriculum  around  student  interests  fosters  intrinsic  motivation  and 
stimulates  the  passion  to  learn.  One  way  to  take  learning  in  a  direction  relevant  to  student  interest  is  to  invite 
student dialogue about the lessons and units of study. Given the opportunity for input, students generate ideas and 
set goals that make for much richer activities than I could have created or imagined myself. When students have 
ownership in the curriculum, they are motivated to work hard and master the skills necessary to reach their goals.  
Helping  students  to  develop  a  deep  love  and  respect  for  themselves,  others,  and  their  environment  occurs 
through an open sharing of ideas and a judicious approach to discipline. When the voice of each student is heard, 
and environment evolves where students feel free to express themselves. Class meetings are one way to encourage 
such dialogue. Students  have  greater respect for their teachers, their peers, and the lessons presented  when they 
feel  safe  and  sure  of  what  is  expected  of  them.  In  setting  fair  and  consistent  rules  initially  and  stating  the 

Вестник КазНПУ им. Абая, серия «Педагогические науки», №3(39), 2013 г. 
94 
importance of every activity, students are shown respect for their presence and time. In turn they learn to respect 
themselves, others, and their environment. 
For me, teaching provides an opportunity for continual learning and growth. One of my hopes as an educator is 
to instill a love of learning in my students, as I share my own passion for learning with them. I feel there is a need 
for  compassionate,  strong,  and  dedicated  individuals  who  are  excited  about  working  with  children.  In  our 
competitive society it  is important for students to  not only receive a solid  education, but to work  with someone 
who is aware of and sensitive to their individual needs. I am such a person and will always strive to be the best 
educator that I can be. 
I believe each and every child has the potential to bring something unique and special to the world. I will help 
children to develop their potential by believing in them as capable individuals. I will assist children in discovering 
who they are, so they can express their own opinions and nurture their own ideas. I have a vision of a world where 
people  learn  to  respect,  accept,  and  embrace  the  differences  between  us,  as  the  core  of  what  makes  life  so 
fascinating. 
I should practice professionalism such as showing good leadership skills for my students. In my opinion, being 
an authoritarian will only create a distance between a teacher and a student. As a teacher, I should be able to attend 
to  my  students’  personal  and  academic  needs  whenever  needed.  In  addition,  I  will  try  to  create  a  comfortable 
learning  environment based on respect instead of fear. In order to achieve that, I must build strong rapport with 
my  students  so  that  all  of  us  can  learn  in  a  conducive  and  fun  environment.  Likewise,  communication  is 
apparently an important key to an effective teaching and learning process in the academic setting. 
My  students  are  my  main  priority  and  I  am  aware  that  each  of  them  has  different  level  of  proficiency  in 
English  language.  During  class,  I  believe  that  most  people  learn  best  when  they  are  not  passively  observing  a 
lecture, but instead when they are actively participating in the lesson, when they are involved, explaining, solving, 
talking, trying, working, and struggling. People learn when they are figuring things out for themselves, rather than 
expecting others to teach them. I believe that by creating a student-centered learning, my students will be able to 
take  charge  of  their  own  learning  with  little  assistance  from  the  teacher.  This  will  inculcate  a  sense  of 
responsibility in them in terms of achieving their learning goal. As a teacher, one of my roles would be to coach 
and facilitate them throughout the learning process by providing information and giving useful guidelines in order 
for them to achieve their learning target. 
By being more resourceful, I will be able to achieve self-satisfaction and success in teaching. As a teacher, I 
am open to new ideas and suggestions therefore I would like to be more involved in educational activities, attend 
educational talks and participate in forums or conferences to further expand my knowledge. Moreover, being up-
to-date  with  the  latest  information,  keeping  in  touch  with  global  issues  and  getting  my  hands  on  the  latest 
technology are some  of the  ways for  me to  improve  myself. In  my view, I could also incorporate them into  my 
classroom  practice  because  as  for  me,  knowledge-wise,  teachers  should  be  at  least  two  or  three  steps  ahead  of 
their students. Therefore I have to be well-prepared for every lesson by planning my time and materials efficiently 
to  ensure  that  a  successful  lesson  takes  place.  I  also  feel  that  it  is  wise  to  reflect  on  every  lesson  that  has  been 
conducted so that I can identify the strengths and rectify the weaknesses. 
Last  but  not  least,  my  students  should  be  encouraged  to  explore  every  opportunity  to  utilize  the  authentic 
resources around their  environment. In order to achieve this, I would vary  my teaching styles  while at the same 
time encouraging critical thinking skills among my students. In my personal point of view, a teacher should dare 
to be different. I think that learning should not only be limited within the four walls. I will try to make my lessons 
more relevant and appropriate to my students so that they can relate whatever they learn in the classroom with the 
‘real’ environment outside of the academic setting. At the end of the day, my students should be able to have self-
confidence,  good  interpersonal  skills  and  excellent  knowledge  once  they  have  mastered  the  crucial  skills  to 
survive outthere. 
Teaching philosophies are typically between one and four double-spaced pages but may be longer or shorter 
depending on your circumstances. They are written for two particular audiences. The first is search committees, 
since  teaching  philosophies  are  increasingly  becoming  part  of  the  academic  job  search  dossier.  The  second 
audience  is  yourself and  your colleagues. In this case, the teaching philosophy serves a formative purpose — a 
document that helps you reflect on and improve your teaching. 
During  the  20  years  I  have  been  working  in  the  field  of  English  language  teaching  and  learning,  I  have  put 
myself in the position of language learner rather than teacher. In addition to enjoying language study and finding 
the process fascinating, I have  learned something from  every teacher I have  ever had, even the  worst of them. I 
think  a  good  teacher  should  have  qualities  of  four  areas,  such  as:  affective  characteristics,  skills,  classroom 
management techniques and academic knowledge. 

Абай атындағы ҚазҰПУ-нің Хабаршысы, «Педагогика ғылымдары» сериясы, №3(39), 2013 г. 
95 
1.  Haugen, Lee. “Writing a Teaching Philosophy Statement.”Center for Teaching Effectiveness.Iowa State University. 
2.  Lang, James M. "4 Steps to a Memorable Teaching Philosophy.The Chronicle of Higher Education.August 29, 2010.  
3.  Mangum, Teresa. "Views of the Classroom."Insider Higher Education. October 28, 2009.  
4.  Montell, Gabriela. “How to Write a Statement of Teaching Philosophy.”The Chronicle of Higher Education. March 
27, 2003.   
5.  Montell, Gabriela. “What’s your Philosophy on Teaching, and Does it Matter?” The Chronicle of Higher Education. 
March 27, 2003.  
6.  O'Neal,  Chris,  Deborah  Meizlish,  and  Matthew  Kaplan."Writing  a  Teaching  Philosophy  for  the  Academic  Job 
Search."CRLT Occasional Papers.No. 23.University of Michigan Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. 2007.. 
7.  Van Note Chism, Nancy."Writing a Philosophy of Teaching Statement.”Ohio State University. 
8.  Vick, Julie Miller and Jennifer S. Furlong. "Writing Samples and Teaching Statements," Julie Miller Vick and Jennifer 
S. Furlong, The Chronicle of Higher Education Dec. 20, 2010.  
9.  Mark Lenssen Prize for Publishing on Teaching Philosophy (2002, 2004, 2006, 2010) 
 

жүктеу 5.1 Kb.

Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   46




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет