Қазақстан Республикасы Тәуелсіздігінің 25 жылдығына арналған «ЖАҢА Қазақстанды қалыптастырудағЫ Қр тұҢҒыш президенті н.Ә. Назарбаевтың тағдыркешті шешімдері»



жүктеу 4.82 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
бет6/47
Дата08.09.2017
өлшемі4.82 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   47

 

 

57 

 

Eugene LEVIN, Houghton MI, United States of America 



Farit Nizametdinov, Karaganda, KSTU 

Victor Dolgonosov, Karagand, KSTU 

 

KSTU - MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY: THE 

RESULT OF THE EDUCATIONAL POLICY OF N.A. NAZARBAYEV 

 

There is a large and growing societal need for scientists and engineers with 

advanced training in the geospatial and geotechnical technologies. In particular, 

there is a recognized need in different disciplines to gather, analyze and interpret 

geographically  referenced  spatial  information  data.  Powerful  new  research  and 

technological  tools  for  addressing  these  problems  require  undergraduate  and 

graduate-level  training  in  the  geospatial  sciences  for  their  effective  use.  This 

report  focuses  on  educational  aspects  of  Karaganda  State  Technological 

University (KSTU) and Michigan Tech University collaboration. Michigan Tech 

Geospatial  Initiative  has  led  to  innovative  ideas  of  collaborative  with  KSTU 

development  of  geospatial  educational  components,  research,  and  international 

outreach.  Much  of  the  educational  curriculum  in  new  Integrated  Geospatial 

Technology  graduate  degree  is  comprised  of  a  developed  online  component. 

Coursework  can  be  delivered  worldwide  in  an  effort  to  target  and  encourage 

students  around  the  world.  It  also  can  be  useful  for  continuing  education  of 

geospatial  professionals  worldwide.  Collaboration  developed  may  lead  to 

mutual  responses  in  addressing  United  Nation  initiatives  related  to  geospatial 

training  and  education.   This paper describes  the  above  mentioned  activities  in 

more detail. 

INTRODUCTION 

The  heightened  concern  for  the  environment  and  the  focus  on  sustainable 

economic  development  greatly  increase  the  demand  for  credible  and  accurate 

geospatial  data.  Terabytes  of  geospatial  data  and  metadata  about  the  Earth  are 

routinely  acquired  using  sophisticated  technology  such  as  global  navigational 

satellite  systems  (GNSS),  aerial  and  satellite  panchromatic  and  hyperspectral 

remote  sensors,  high  precision  optical-electronic  surveying  instruments,  laser 

scanning  systems,  radars,  and  sonar.  Geographic  data  helps  scientists  from 

diverse  disciplines  including  geology,  volcanology,  forestry,  agriculture,  social 

sciences,  demography,  history,  and  political  science  to  study  the  Earth  and 

phenomena  induced  by  human  activity.  Characteristically,  geospatial  data  and 

technologies are used by scientists in other disciplines as enablers, to help them 

succeed in their research. However, the acquisition and processing of such data 

is  an  applied  science  and  technology  by  itself.  The  roots  of  these  technologies 

and  the  analysis procedures  they  employ  are  embedded  in the traditional  fields 

of  surveying,  geodetic  science,  photogrammetry,  cartography,  and  mapping. 

Enriched with new technological development in optics, electronics, computing, 



58 

 

and  data  networks,  these  traditional  fields  emerge  in  a  new  blend  of  applied 



science integrated geospatial technologies (IGT)

Without a doubt the geospatial information enterprise is large and growing. 

The various studies and reports are unanimous in that assessment. However, the 

available estimates of the size of the enterprise vary due to the lack of a standard 

industry  definition  [Ohio  State  2002].  The  photogrammetrist  and  geodesist 

Duane Marble extensively probed the question “Who are we?”, i.e., who is to be 

counted  as  a  member  of  the  geospatial  workforce[Marble  2006].  He  identified 

three groups of workers whose primary concerns are knowledge generation and 

integration,  tool  development  and  testing,  and  utilization  of  knowledge  and 

tools.  As  to  the  cost  of  goods,  a  survey  of  the  American  Society  for 

Photogrammetry  and  Remote  Sensing  (ASPRS)  estimated  the  revenues  of  the 

remote sensing and geospatial information industry to be $2.4 billion for 2010, 

and predicted growth to more than $6 billion by 2012 [Mondello et al. 2006] . 

The  National  Aeronautics  and  Space  Administration  (NASA),  in  consultation 

with  the  Geospatial  Workforce  Development  Center  at  the  University  of 

Southern  Mississippi,  estimated  that  the  U.S.  geospatial  technology  market 

would generate $30 billion a year by 2005—$20 billion for remote sensing and 

$10 billion for geographic information services [Gaudet et al 2003].[Longley et 

al 2005] estimate that there are about four million GIS (geographic information 

systems) users worldwide, working at about two million sites. Efforts to define 

the geospatial workforce and to estimate the extent of the geospatial industry are 

continuing.  Summarizing  these  efforts  is  not  the  scope  of  this  paper.  We 

recommend  “googling”  the  information.  One  might  start  with  the  U.S. 

Department of Labor’s homepage. 

http://www.doleta.gov/BRG/Indprof/geospatial_profile.cfm)  which  presents  an 

informative industry profile on the high growth of geospatial technology. 

Whatever  the  actual  size  and  diversity  of  the  geospatial  information 

workforce, it is  clear  that  there  is  a  great demand  for individuals  with  a strong 

geospatial  background  to  support  industry  growth  and  consumer  satisfaction. 

Required is integrative and unified professional knowledge in the various areas 

of quantitative geospatial techniques and technologies. An integrated approach 

to  geospatial  education  is  presented  to  meet  these  educational  and  training 

challenges. 

1.

 

OPPORTUNITY AND ACTION PLAN 

Developing  countries  are  working  hard  in  achieving  better  standard  of  life 

for  their  citizens  through  embracing  new  technologies  in  different  aspects  of 

sciences  such  as  the  peaceful  use  of  aerospace  sciences  for  natural  resources 

management.  Geospatial  science  and  technology  has  different  applications  in 

developing  countries  such  as;  in  environmental  monitoring,  disaster 

management, management of natural resources, precision agriculture; surveying 

and  mapping;  Earth sciences, air  and  land transportation;  and  precision timing. 

For example, without a sound cadastral system, developing countries could not 


59 

 

assure the reliability of land titles. Without it, countries will find it impossible to 



encourage  sustainable  investment  towards  the  entrepreneurial  use  of  land  to 

maximize economic benefits. Certainly preparation of the geospatial workforce 

for  these  countries  are  of  their  vital  national  interest.  It  is  obvious  that  cost 

associated  with  geospatial  science  and  technology  specialist’s  preparation  may 

become  an  obstacle.  What  is  a  possible  solution  for  the  problem  stated?  From 

the  authors  point  of  view, one  of  the  viable  mechanisms  is  the  United  Nations 

University  program  [UNU].  Institutions  of  the  UNU  contributes  to  the  UNU 

mission,  which  is  "to  contribute,  through  research  and  capacity  building,  to 

efforts to resolve the pressing global problems that are the concern of the United 

Nations,  its  Peoples  and  Member  States".  Example  of  the  sucessful 

iplementation of such a solution is cooperation between International Traininng 

Center (ITC)  [ITC]  and  the  UNU  which  is directed  at developing and carrying 

out a joint programme on capacity building in disaster management and in land 

administration,  and  at  disseminating  knowledge  on  these  and  directly  related 

issues.  We  believe  that  Michigan  Tech  and  KSTU  have  the  potential  to  build 

collaboratively  sucessful  UNU  academic  programs  in  geospatial  science  and 

technology.  Specifically  collaboration  of  the  two  schools  can  be  fruitful  in 

resolution of a perceived contradiction between “Training” and “Education.” In 

certain geospatial areas(GIS,Remote Sensing) it is important to provide students 

with  minimum  “mouse-clicking”  skills,  also  known  as  “buttonology.” 

Buttonology is defined in Wikipedia as “basic training required to start using a 

piece of software: what the components of the interface are, what they do, how 

to  accomplish  basic  tasks.”  Geospatial  education  requires  the  study  of 

fundamental  mathematical  and  physics  principles  and  other  phenomena  and 

processes  which  are  implemented  as  “technology  behind  the  buttons.” 

Therefore, whereas buttonology will not be ignored entirely, every effort will be 

made  to  use  it  to  advance  education.  In  this  effort  it  is  obviously  rational 

distribution  of  strengths  where  traditionally  strong  KSTU  fundamental  science 

education  can  be  combined  with  reputable  training  and  Michigan  Tech  where 

graduates are known as ”ready to work on the first day of hire”. We also believe 

that  summer  internships  in  the  Russian  Federation  and  the  United  States  may 

give  forthcoming  UNU  program  students  opportunity  to  experience  different 

eneterprenurship  approaches.  Specifically,  for  countries  like  Mongolia, another 

adavantage of participation in such a program can be practicing in both Russian 

and English languages. Bellow we will decribe our first steps towards this goal. 

1.1

 

Geospatial education opportunities at Michigan Tech 

Research-based,  multidisciplinary  graduate  education  will  prepare  students 

to  master  the  necessary  technical,  analytical,  business,  and  interpersonal 

competencies.  The  interdisciplinary  graduate  education  promotes  the  adoption 

of  such  key  elements  as  spatial  analysis,  geographic  modeling,  and  geodetic 

accuracy  considerations  among  the  various  disciplines  that  employ  geospatial 



60 

 

technologies.  Figure  1  gives  a  list  of  existing  and  forthcoming  geospatial 



degrees obtainable from Michigan Tech. 

 

Figure 1.  Structure of Michigan Tech degrees in Geospatial Science, 



Technologies and Geoinformatics 

 

1.1.1



 

Baccalaureate Level 

The  undergraduate  programs  in  surveying,  the  natural  sciences,  electrical 

and  mechanical  engineering,  and  computer  science  form  a  broad  basis  of  the 

structure.  Clearly,  surveying  students  are  part  of  the  graduate  program  input 

stream, but not exclusively. Broadening this input stream is important to us, not 

only  as  a  way  of  increasing  the  number  of  students  but  also  to  foster  the 

multidisciplinary  composition  of  the  student  body.  The  B.S.  in  Surveying 

Engineering  [Surveying]  already  exists  at  School  of  Technology.  Also  in 

existence  is  a  Geospatial  Engineering  Emphasis  [Geospatial  Emphasis]  for  the 

B.S.  in  Engineering  degree  offered  at  College  of  Engineering.  A  minor  in 

Surveying Engineering for the B.S. in Civil Engineering degree is in the process 

of being approved. 

1.1.2


 

Master Level 

The M.Sc. in Spatial Information Science offers a geospatial specialization 

for students with a background in the natural sciences such as forestry, geology, 

environmental  studies  and  nature  conservancy,  and  similar  areas.  GIS  and 

remote  sensing  coursework  will  be  adapted  with  consideration  of  specific 

environmental problems that are relevant to the background of these students. 


61 

 

Another degree, the M.Sc. in Geoinformatics, is intended for students with a 



background in electrical, mechanical, computer, and other engineering sciences. 

The  expected  areas  of  concentration  are  manned/unmanned  robotic  platforms 

guidance, navigation and control, location-based services, and geospatial virtual 

and augmented reality. Students will be able to learn about positioning sensors, 

terrain 3D modeling, and visualization. 

Both these interdisciplinary degrees include a tailored geospatial component 

which  provides  non-geospatial  students  with  an  introduction  to  core  geospatial 

disciplines such as geodesy, photogrammetry, cartography, remote sensing, and 

GIS.  M.Sc.  degree  in  Integrated  Geospatial  Technology  [IGT]  represents  a 

curriculum continuation for geospatial students primarily.  

A  total  of  30  credit  hours  are  required  for  each  M.Sc.  program.  There  are 

three required courses totaling six credit hours for IGT program which forms the 

introductory  geospatial  component.  This  component  comprises  the  SU5010 

(Geospatial Concepts, Technologies, and Data), FW 5810 (Research Methods in 

Natural  Resources),  and  SU5800  (Master's  Graduate  Seminar)  courses.  The 

remainder  of  the  curriculum,  termed  the  Integrated  Geospatial  Technology 

program, is designed as follows: (a) course-only option with 24 elective credits 

hours,  (b)  project  option  with  18-22  credit  hours  of  elective  courses  and  2-6 

credits  for  a  practicum  and  a  report,  and  (c)  research  option  with  14-18  credit 

hours of elective courses and 6-10 credits for research. 

The  themes  of  the  elective  courses  are  geodesy,  Geographic  Information 

Science,  remote  sensing,  and  geospatial  metadata  and  cartography.  The  large 

variety  of  available  courses  provides  students  with  many  choices  when 

designing  their  program  of  study.  The  following  graduate  courses  are  included 

in Michigan Tech’s Geospatial curriculum: 

Geodesy:  The  geodesy  courses  are  designed  to  provide  students  with  the 

knowledge required to master accurate geospatial positioning based on rigorous 

geodetic theory and focus on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The 

courses  include  SU5020  (Data  Analysis  and  Adjustments),  SU5021  (Geodetic 

Models),  SU5022  (Positioning  with  GNSS),  and  SU5023  (Geospatial 

Positioning). 



Geographic  Information  Science:  The  courses  in  geographic  information 

science  provide  students  with  an  introduction to the  information science  issues 

associated  with  processing  and  displaying  geographical  data.  The  courses 

include  SU5003  (GIS  Technology  Fundamentals),  SU5041  (Geospatial  Data 

Processing), and SU5043 (Topographic Analysis). 

Remote  Sensing:  The  courses  in  remote  sensing  provide  a  background  in 

wireless  or  noncontact  methods  of  obtaining  information  related  to  geospatial 

objects.  The  courses  include  SU5002  (Infrared  Technology,  Sensors,  and 

Applications), SU5004 (Introduction to Geospatial Image Processing), GE5930 

(Synthetic  Aperture  Radar  Fundamentals  and  Applications),  FW5540 

(Advanced Terrestrial Remote Sensing), FW5560 (Digital Image Processing: A 



62 

 

Remote  Sensing  Perspective),  and  FW5510  (Applied  Terrestrial  Laser 



Scanning). 

Geospatial  Metadata  and  Cartography:  This  group  of  courses  provides 

the knowledge and background to understand the science of describing data and 

visualization  in  different  types  of  maps.  The  courses  include  SU5042  (Digital 

Cartography),  FW5550  (Geographic  Information  Systems  for  Resource 

Management), and GE5250 (Advanced Computational Geosciences). 

1.1.3


 

 Graduate Certificate 

The  courses  referred  to  above  are  also  available  to  students  seeking  a 

Graduate  Certificate.  Any  combination  of  15  credits,  i.e.,  five  courses,  may  be 

selected, depending on the student’s technical area of interest. Example groups 

of courses oriented towards particular areas of emphasis are as follows: 



GNSS and GIS: SU5020; SU5021; SU5022; SU5003; FW5560 

Surveying and GNSS: SU5010; SU5023; SU5003; SU4041; FW5560 

GIS  and  3D  Visualization:  SU5004  (FW5560),  SU5010;  SU5041; 

SU5042; SU5043 (FW5510) 



Remote  Sensing  and  GIS:  SU3540;  SU5001;  SU5002;  SU5004 

(FW5560), SU5010; SU5023; SU5930 



Automated  Cartography  and GIS:  SU3540;  SU5001;  SU5002;  SU5004 

(FW5560), SU5041; SU5043 (FW5510) 



Manned  &  Unmanned  Robotic  Platforms  (UAV/UGV)  Guidance, 

Navigation  and  Control  (Geospatial  Background):  SU5004  (FW5560), 

SU5010; SU5023; SU5041; SU5042 



Interdisciplinary: SU5021; SU5023; SU5041; SU5042; SU5930 

1.1.4


 

Ph.D Level 

Our  goal  is  to  take  graduate  students  with  research  experience  to  the  next 

level  of  geospatial  science.  It  is  clear  that  multiple  interdisciplinary  research 

collaboration must be deepened to achieve that goal. Michigan Tech has already 

successfully  demonstrated  its  ability  to  put  together  interdisciplinary  Ph.D. 

programs  that  are  housed  within  the  Graduate  School  and  allow  faculty  from 

multiple  disciplines  to  work  together  across  traditional  disciplinary  boundaries 

and departmental structures. To develop the new Ph.D. programs it is necessary 

to:  (1)  bring  together  a  group  of  colleagues  from  multiple  disciplines  (intra-

university and from outside the university); (2) build bridges between traditional 

administrative units to enable scientists and students from multiple disciplines to 

learn from one another; and (3) provide the framework of knowledge necessary 

to develop interdisciplinary links among different disciplines. This seems to be a 

reasonable roadmap to the future Ph.D. level geospatial degree. 

1.1.5


 

Continuing Education –non degree seeking option 

Michigan Tech’s current series of nine 1-credit hour GPS-GAP[GPS-GAP] 

courses  provide  in-depth  knowledge  about  the  3-dimensional  geodetic  model, 

conformal  mapping,  geodetic-quality  relative  positioning,  and  precise  point 

positioning  with  GNSS.  The  course  material  is  mathematical  in  nature  and 



63 

 

algorithmically  and  geodetically  correct  and  complete.  Many  computational 



laboratories  use  actual  data,  such  as  pseudoranges  and  carrier  phases,  and 

instructor-provided software which is available to students. This approach frees 

learners  from  the  constraints  of  commercial  software  and  offers  the  possibility 

of further experimentation and development. 

Three  1-credit  hour  units  are  being  developed  which  are  based  on  the 

original  GPS-GAP  series  but  deemphasize  mathematical  aspects  in  favor  of 

more sample computations, interpretation, and applications using Mathcad. This 

new series is expected to become available in the spring of 2012 and is geared 

toward individuals who seek general understanding of GPS-GAP principles, not 

mathematical depth.  

Using Skype or similar software for free Internet communication, free screen 

sharing  software,  or  even  conferencing  software  makes  for  a  truly  unique, 

location-independent  learning  environment  which  lends  itself  naturally  to 

individualized  instruction.  In  this  environment,  students  are  able  to  view, 

repeatedly,  lectures,  numerical  solution  implementations,  and  quiz  questions, 

and  consult  the  instructor  as  needed.  The  quiz  questions  are  a  very  important 

part of the asynchronous, iterative learning strategy. The questions are presented 

in  a  graphical  format.    This  format  makes  it  possible  to  create  powerful 

composites  of  equations,  figures,  text,  and  images  as  part  of  quiz  questions. 

There  is  a  tight  integration  of  the  textbook  GPS  Satellite  Surveying,  the 

PowerPoint presentations with audio, and the Mathcad solutions with audio. The 

textbook  and  the  course  material  were  developed  specifically  with  online 

instruction in mind. 

Following the  iterative  learning  strategy:    students  first  listen to  the lecture 

and the Mathcad implementation, perhaps even experiments with live Mathcad 

solutions of their own, and then study the quiz questions. If the students do not 

feel  ready  to  take  the  quiz,  they  can  listen  to  the  lecture  again,  study  the  quiz 

questions once more, and repeat this cycle until they are comfortable to take the 

quiz.  This  iterative  approach  assures  that  students  do  not  overlook  the 

mathematical detail and the finer points presented in the lecture, since the quiz 

questions are a subtle reminder of what has been missed. 

2.

 

CURRENT  COLLABORATIVE  EFFORTS  AND  FUTURE 

PLANS 

KSTU  (Kazakhstan)  and  Michigan  Tech  University  (Houghton,  Michigan 

USA)  are  working  on  agreement  of  academic  cooperation.  This  academic 

agreement assumes the following activities: 

- exchange of scholars; 

- facilitating joint research projects; 

- creating joint research networks; 

- co-sponsoring of/participation in workshops and/or conference days

-  facilitating  joint  preparation  and  publication  of  articles  on  topics  of 

mutual interest; 



64 

 

- exchange of students. 



The collaborative efforts of Michigan Tech and  KSTU in advancement and 

globalization  geospatial  education  are  associated  with  geospatial  research, 

expanding  collaborations  with  other  geospatial  programs  recognized  nationally 

and  internationally  in  terms  of  research  and  instruction,  and  aggressive 

utilization  of  the  latest  Internet  communication  tools  to  build  an  educational 

environment  that  is  location-independent  and  enables  individualized  learning 

opportunities.  The  KSTU  and  Michigan  Tech  programs  makes  every  effort  to 

maintain  open  communication  with  professional  groups,  particularly  the  FIG, 

ASPRS and ISPRS. 


Каталог: sites -> default -> files -> publications
publications -> Қ 25 Еуразияшылдық: теория және практика. Оқу қҧралы
publications -> Макашева К. Н., Идрышева Ж.Қ
publications -> История развития теоретической метеорологии в ХХ веке
publications -> И. Р. Гальперин: Мәтін әр түрлі лексикалық
publications -> С. Б. Бөрібаева Борибаева Сафура Болатовна Boribaeva Safura Bolatovna
publications -> Әл-Фараби атындағы ҚазҰу жоо-ға дейінгі дайындық факультеті
publications -> Л. Толстойдың «Той тарқар» шығармасының қазақ тіліне аударылу тарихы
publications -> Айтбаев Н. Б. (Қарағанды, Қармту) Айтбаев Б
publications -> Жоо-ға дейінгі білім беру факультеті Танымдық, ұлттық ойын элементтерін тарих пәні сабағында пайдаланудың маңызы
publications -> Биология пәнінен оқушылардың білім сапасын арттыруда жаңа технологияларды пайдаланудың тиімді әдіс-тәсілдері

жүктеу 4.82 Mb.

Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   47




©emirb.org 2020
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет