Шығыстың аймақтық хабаршысы



жүктеу 5.09 Kb.

бет1/11
Дата10.09.2017
өлшемі5.09 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11

Тоқсанына бір рет шығарылады
  
 
 
 
         
Шығыстың аймақтық хабаршысы
ҚОҒАМДЫҚ ЖӘНЕ ГУМАНИТАРЛЫҚ ҒЫЛЫМДАР
ОБщЕСТВЕННЫЕ И ГУМАНИТАРНЫЕ НАУКИ
SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES
UDC 311.21:316.62(574+579)
A.A. AKHMEDINA, A.K. NURIDDENOVA
Lev Nikolayevich Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Astana, Kazakhstan
SUICIDE RATES OF KAZAKHSTAN AND SOUTH KOREA: 
MAIN CAUSES AND SOLUTION ATTEMPTS
This work covers the current suicide situation in South Korea and Kazakhstan. It com-
pares the two countries and attempts to describe possible solutions to the problem. It is thought 
that in order to deal with suicide problem Kazakhstan needs to use experience of countries 
with higher development level like South Korea and build its own suicide prevention strategy, 
basing on it. 
Keywords: suicide, statistics, Kazakhstan, South Korea, survey.
ҚАЗАҚСТАН МЕН ОҢТҮСТІК КОРЕЯНЫҢ СУИЦИД СТАТИСТИКАСЫ: 
БАСТЫ СЕБЕПТЕР МЕН ШЕШУ ЖОЛДАРЫ
Бұл  мақалада  Оңтүстік  Корея  мен  Қазақстанның  қазіргі  суицид  мәселесінің 
жағдайы туралы баяндалады. Екі мемлекетті салыстыра отыра, аталған мәселенің шешу 
жолдары сипатталады. 
Түйін сөздер: суицид, статистика, Қазақстан, Оңтүстік Корея, сауалнама.
СТАТИСТИКА СУИЦИДОВ КАЗАХСТАНА И ЮЖНОЙ КОРЕИ: 
ГЛАВНЫЕ ПРИЧИНЫ И ПОПЫТКИ РЕШЕНИЯ
В данной статье приводятся общие сведения о статистике суицидов в Южной Ко-
рее и Казахстане. Проводится сравнительный анализ проблемы суицида в двух странах 
и описываются пути решения этой проблемы. 
Ключевые слова: суицид, статистика, Казахстан, Южная Корея, опрос.
 These two countries were selected on the following bases:
– 
Comparison of native land (Kazakhstan) with the country of the studied lan-
guage (South Korea)
– 
Growing suicide problem in both countries
140

141
Региональный вестник Востока
  
 
 
 
 
        
Выпускается ежеквартально
– 
Growing  need  to  compare  Kazakhstan’s  suicide  situation  with  other  highly 
developed countries like South Korea on the basis of its previous experience
In recent years sociologists, psychiatrics, statisticians, and physicians became 
increasingly aware of suicide as not only one of the leading causes of death in the 
world, but also as a major public health problem and a clinical issue. According to 
the World Health Organization (WHO), the annual death toll from suicide worldwide 
is estimated to be nearly 800 000 people and more than half of these occurs in Asia. 
It means that somebody dies by taking their own life every 40 seconds [1]. For every 
suicide that results in death there are between 10 and 40 attempted suicides. Techno-
logical advances led people to choose newer methods to end their own life. Firearms 
and widely available poisons became popular suicide methods. New theories and ex-
planations for what drove people to self-harm also merged. WHO named risk factors 
for suicide which include mental disorder (such as depression, personality disorder, 
alcohol dependence, or schizophrenia), and some physical illnesses, such as neurologi-
cal disorders, cancer, and HIV infection.
No less significant has been factors related to economic turmoil. The rates soared 
after the Asian financial crisis of 1997 and the global financial crisis of 2008. In Ko-
rea, massive corporate restructuring triggered job insecurity, toughened competition 
and heightened the overall stress levels as well as the intensity of depression [4]. At 
that time many countries underwent economic upheavals but their suicide rates didn’t 
increase so sharply like it happened in South Korea. The suicide rates in this coun-
try more than quadrupled from 6.8 in 1982 to 31.0 in 2009 [2]. South Korea has the 
second-highest suicide rate in the world as the WHO affirms, as well as the highest 
suicide rate for OECD member state. It is now the number one cause of death for its 
citizens between the ages of 10 and 30. Among the people who committed suicide 
were a number of popular artists, politicians, athletes such as former president Roh 
Moo-hyun, former Busan mayor Ahn Sang-Young, former South Jeolla governor Park 
Tae-young and former Hyundai chairman Chung Mong-hun. [6] Areas with the high-
est suicide rates include provinces such as Gangwon (391.0 person), Ulsan (387.7), 
Gyeonggi (339.5) and special city of Seoul (314.3) [12].
I have carried out an opinion poll in which 20 Koreans at the age of 18 to 50 
have participated, regardless of sex and occupation. 65% of the polled receive stress 
because of overwork and an excessive education process, other 35% worry about their 
future. 80% are engaged in various hobby activities in order to dispel stress, 10% re-
sort to alcohol, 10% think that fighting stress is useless. People who consider self-harm 
a taboo amount to 80%, other 20% recognize suicide as a lawful right of each person. 
Half of participants believes that economic and social circumstances are the main rea-
son, while the other half thinks that the main reason of high suicide rates is a severe 
competition and a Korean traditional feature of valuing only the first place. As it can 
A.A. AKHMEDINA, A.K. NURIDDENOVA. 3 (71) 2016. Р. 140-148                     
 
                ISSN 1683-1667 

142
Тоқсанына бір рет шығарылады
  
 
 
 
         
Шығыстың аймақтық хабаршысы
be seen from the poll, reasons for committing a suicide differ depending on age. While 
younger people become over-stressed because of the highly competitive education and 
examination system, adults experience stress from unemployment and overwork. To 
succeed in South Korean social system, 77% of all elementary to high school students 
spend on average 10.2 hours per week in cramming schools, which they attend after 
their usual school hours. Employees have exactly the same situation. Korea was on 
top of the list of countries with the longest working hours until 2007. On average, men 
have a suicide rate that is twice as high as women’s [8]. However, the suicide attempt 
rate is higher for women than men. According to a study, because men use more severe 
and lethal suicide methods, men have higher suicidal completion rate than women. 
Based on the table below, the older people are most likely to commit a suicide 
and endure extreme poverty because of the limited state support and a desire, as they 
claim in death notes, to not be a burden to their families. 28.1% of all suicides in South 
Korea are committed by old people [7]. Suicide rates among old people aged 65 and 
over were five times higher in 2009 than in 1990. Financial challenges after a com-
paratively early retirement with the state-run pension system, which has taken shape 
only in the last two decades and is largely thought to be ineffective, are reckoned to 
be a major cause. The maximum amount of the basic pension is nearly 200 USD per 
month [8]. Those who have working children are not eligible for pension. To add up, 
over the past 15 years, the percentage of children who 
Diagram 1. Statistics by WHO, 2012
SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

143
Региональный вестник Востока
  
 
 
 
 
        
Выпускается ежеквартально
think they should look after their parents has shrunk from 90% to 37%, according 
to government polls [8]. South Korean society is currently facing collective cultural 
ambivalence. Confucian values that existed for so many centuries were destroyed by 
a new set of Western values that came along with incredibly fast industrialization. In 
much of Asia, a powerful Confucian social contract has for centuries dictated that chil-
dren care for their ageing parents. But that filial piety is weakening as younger genera-
tions migrate to cities. South Korea has accumulated wealth so quickly. Consequently, 
materialism with ruthless competition for the best test scores and more prestigious jobs 
became one of the main characteristics of modern South Korean society. Certainly, 
tension arises and can be a source of distress creating ambiguous social expectations. 
The current division of the Korean Peninsula also influence on suicide statistics. 
Over the past 10 years, 6% to 7% of defectors who have died killed themselves. But 
recently there has been a big rise - 14% of deaths among defectors in 2015 have been 
suicides [11]. 50% of defectors described their status in the North as “upper” or “mid-
dle” class, but only 26% said they fell into this category in the South. The vast major-
ity – 73% – described their new status as lower class. Self-harm reasons of defectors 
include new economic reality, which can be very different from the life portrayed in 
the South Korean soap operas smuggled into the North, and homesickness.
Suicide is a complex problem, which is linked to various factors, such as alco-
holism, violence, social and economic conditions. This is why the suicide problem 
is considered to be one of the most complicated one to solve. Suicide has become 
the fourth most common cause of death in South Korea, with up to 40 of its citizens 
taking their own lives every day, and the government has realized that it is a prob-
lem that needs tackling. The Korea Association for Suicide Prevention was created in 
2003 and a national campaign was launched [5]. The campaign includes educational 
workshops, promotion of various ways of coping with stress and unhappiness through 
media. Nowadays officials watch on people through cameras and through cooperation 
with a suicide hotline called LifeLine Korea. Psychiatric specialists started studying 
the mental environment of people who committed suicide by conducting in-depth in-
terviews with their survivors.
More than that, South Korean government started a program of shock therapy 
by encouraging citizens to take part in their own mock funerals [14]. Participants write 
wills and farewell letters and climb into caskets, contemplating the pain their death 
would cause family and friends. Before climbing into their caskets, they watch inspira-
tional videos of their compatriots, including cancer sufferers and people with disabili-
ties, who had overcome adversity. Despite its macabre overtones, this shocking expe-
rience is designed to emphasize the value of living and reset minds for a completely 
fresh start. The Seoul municipal government launched a campaign in 2012 to rebrand 
the city’s eerie Mapo Bridge, known to residents as the “Bridge of Death,” where doz-
A.A. AKHMEDINA, A.K. NURIDDENOVA. 3 (71) 2016. Р. 140-148                     
 
                ISSN 1683-1667 

144
Тоқсанына бір рет шығарылады
  
 
 
 
         
Шығыстың аймақтық хабаршысы
ens of people leap into the Han River each year. Due to all these efforts, suicide rate 
reduced to 4.1% in 2015 compared to 2014, which means that Korean government is 
now became able to save 3 people out of 40 every day [11]. 
According to the WHO, while South Korea occupies the 2nd place in suicide 
statistics, Kazakhstan is ranked the 9th over the world and the 1st in Central Asia. It’s 
not a well-known fact that Kazakhstan’s suicide rate is so high. 
Both sexes 
rank
Country
Both 
sexes
Male 
rank
Male
Female 
rank
Female
1
Guyana
44.2
1
70.8
1
22.1
2
South Korea
28.9
5
41.7
5
18.0
3
Sri Lanka
28.8
3
46.4
7
12.8
4
Lithuania
28.2
2
51.0
29
8.4
5
Suriname
27.8
4
44.5
11
11.9
6
Mozambique
27.4
8
34.2
2
21.1
7
Tanzania
24.9
13
31.6
4
18.3
7
Nepal
24.9
17
30.1
3
20.0
9
Kazakhstan
23.8
6
40.6
21
9.3
Ranking by the World Health Organization
After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, it rose steadily to 29.2 in 2000 and 
slowly declined to 25.6 in 2008 and 23.8 in 2012 [14]. Though suicide rate has a ten-
dency to decrease, it is still double of average suicide rate in the world. In accordance 
with the poll among 20 Kazakhstani people at the age of 20 to 50 regardless of sex 
and occupation, 55% of them are disturbed by work and education, 20% have family 
issues, 25% named other various reasons. 35% manages stress problem by hobby ac-
tivities, 25% spend time with family and friends, 20% take antidepressants or do not 
fight stress at all, others find relax in work or studies. For 95% of the polled suicide is 
not an allowed action to do. 100% thinks that the main reason of high suicide rates is 
country’s poor social welfare system. It may be seen that the number of Kazakhstani 
people who don’t fight stress at all or fight it, using methods, which may be injurious to 
health, such as taking antidepressants, is higher than in South Korea. According to the 
poll, while even old people are engaged in hobbies and sport activities, such as hiking, 
mountain climbing, riding a bicycle, in South Korea, Kazakhstani people do not pay 
due attention to hobby activities and sports. It means that Kazakhstan needs to enhance 
SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

145
Региональный вестник Востока
  
 
 
 
 
        
Выпускается ежеквартально
a propaganda of healthy lifestyle, because health propaganda may have a significant 
influence over people’s choices.
In accordance with the table above, same as in South Korea, suicide rates among 
men are almost four times higher than among women. Unlike South Korea, majority 
of suicide victims in Kazakhstan is consisted of young people under 19-20 years, what 
makes the country one of the leaders in suicide rates among young people worldwide. 
Official statistics show that 237 deaths of children and adolescents were recorded in 
2010, and 260 in 2009 [16]. Kazakhstan has the highest incidence of suicides recorded 
among girls aged 15 to 19, and the second highest for boys, after Russia, according to 
the most recent report from the United Nations children’s agency UNICEF, covering 
Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union [16]. There are several fac-
tors behind such high rates of suicide among people of a young age, such as: getting 
bullied in schools; absence or loss of values; lack of family support or understanding; 
financial problems; exposure of minors to violent images on television. 
Self-harm became the 5th leading cause of death in Kazakhstan [17]. Among the 
most affected regions are South and North Kazakhstan regions. Recognizing the grow-
ing problem the Government of Kazakhstan has taken a major step in implementing 
suicide prevention program. The Government acknowledged UNICEF’s technical ex-
pertise, and in December launched a phased suicide prevention activities specifically 
A.A. AKHMEDINA, A.K. NURIDDENOVA. 3 (71) 2016. Р. 140-148                     
 
                ISSN 1683-1667 

146
Тоқсанына бір рет шығарылады
  
 
 
 
         
Шығыстың аймақтық хабаршысы
targeting children and adolescent to be conducted as part of the National Action Plan 
for 2015-2020 on strengthening family relations, moral-ethical and spiritual values 
with support of UNICEF. Due to UNICEF, the assessment of suicide prevention in 
two Kazakhstan regions deepened understanding on ways to decrease suicide rates and 
demonstrated proven strategies in effective prevention of adolescents’ suicidal behav-
ior. The youth resource center’s organizational framework and youth policy indicators 
developed for East Kazakhstan region provided Members of Parliament with youth-
centered and results-based approaches in implementation of youth policy at subnation-
al and community level. An UNICEF-proposed methodology on suicide prevention 
among adolescents was applied in Kyzylorda and is likely to have contributed princi-
pally to a significant reduction in adolescent suicides in the region, equivalent to a five-
fold decrease [16]. Psychological and social counseling center, including psychiatrists 
and sociologists was created at Astana Health Department. Nowadays, Kazakhstani 
government blocks all websites, which spread the information about methods of com-
mitting suicide. Helplines, children’s advice bureaus and 14 crisis centers offering psy-
chological help have existed for some time. But more work needs to be done to make 
possible suicide victims aware of these opportunities to get help and advice.
After the declaration of its independence South Korea had concentrated on eco-
nomical development, which led to the ‘Miracle on the Han river” in only 50 years. 
Unprecedented speed of development intensified problems like alcoholism, suicide, 
corruption and other issues that appear in every country around the world during the 
development process. Suicide problem is observed to grow in every developing coun-
try, Kazakhstan being one of them. Consequently, it’s an issue not only of two coun-
tries, but of the whole of humanity. 100% of the polled South Koreans were well aware 
of country’s high suicide rates. In contrast, only 20% of Kazakhstani people knew 
about the existence of Kazakhstan’s suicide problem. It can be concluded that although 
some minor measures taken, there is no great attention to the problem in Kazakhstan 
as it should be. 
Overall, the following conclusion may be drawn in this paper. Suicide does not 
just occur in low-income countries, but it is a global phenomenon in all regions of the 
world. It is a serious public health problem; however, suicides are preventable with 
timely, evidence-based and often low-cost interventions. In accordance with WHO, 
prevention measures include: 
– 
reducing access to the means of suicide (e.g. pesticides, firearms, certain med-
ications);
– 
reporting by media in a responsible way;
– 
introducing alcohol policies to reduce the harmful use of alcohol;
– 
early identification, treatment and care of people with mental and substance 
use disorders, chronic pain and acute emotional distress; 
SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

147
Региональный вестник Востока
  
 
 
 
 
        
Выпускается ежеквартально
– 
training of non-specialized health workers in the assessment and management 
of suicidal behavior;
– 
follow-up care for people who attempted suicide and provision of community 
support. 
The effectiveness of the aforementioned measures was proved by Finland, which 
was the first country to develop a national suicide prevention strategy [19]. The Finnish 
strategy was implemented in four stages, commencing with a comprehensive analysis 
of 1,397 suicides to identify appropriate target groups and issues. Then the country in-
corporated improved detection and treatment of mental illness as a core feature of the 
strategy, with a particular emphasis on depression. Reducing access to lethal means, 
improved reporting of suicide in the media, school-based programs, treatment of drug 
and alcohol misuse, enhanced access to mental health services, and training for profes-
sionals were the main components of the Finnish strategy.
As Director-General of The World Health Organization Margaret Chan stated, 
the burden of suicide does not weigh solely on the health sector; it has multiple im-
pacts on many sectors and on society as a whole. Thus, to start a successful journey 
towards the prevention of suicide, countries should employ a multisector approach that 
addresses suicide in a comprehensive manner, bringing together the different sectors 
and stakeholders most relevant to each context. The strategy should be tailored to each 
country’s cultural and social context, allocating resources for achieving both short-to-
medium and long-term objectives. There should be effective planning, and the strategy 
should be regularly evaluated, with evaluation findings feeding into future planning. 
Just like South Korea elaborated an effective national strategy, Kazakhstan has to raise 
community  awareness  by  improving  surveillance  and  the  quality  of  psychological 
treatment. Also, the country should create an unique suicide prevention strategy at 
state level, which would coordinate the work of all concerned ministries and agencies. 
Every school should be monitored by a professional psychologist. In order to provide 
such professionals, there is a need to develop training and retraining programs with 
a participation of specialists from UNICEF, WHO and other health organizations and 
institutions. 
As member states of UNICEF and WHO, it is desired that both South Korean 
and Kazakhstani government will elaborate and improve national suicide prevention 
strategies and assist those who are deprived and vulnerable with a help and instruc-
tions from above-mentioned organizations.
REFERENCES
1.  World  Health  Organization.  “Preventing  suicide:  a  global  imperative”.  2014  (in 
Eng).
2. Derek Beattie, Dr. Patrick Devitt. “Suicide: A Modern Obsession” (in Eng).
3. The Korea Foundation. Korea Focus. February 2014 (in Eng).
A.A. AKHMEDINA, A.K. NURIDDENOVA. 3 (71) 2016. Р. 140-148                     
 
                ISSN 1683-1667 

148
Тоқсанына бір рет шығарылады
  
 
 
 
         
Шығыстың аймақтық хабаршысы
4. The Korea Foundation. Korea Focus. October 2012 (in Eng).
5. Paul S.F. YIP. “Suicide in Asia: Causes and Prevention” (in Eng).
6. Rudiger Frank, James E.Hoare. “Korea 2012: Politics, Economy and Society”. Vol-
ume 6 (in Eng).
7. Korea Expose. “No country for old people”. http://www.koreaexpose.com/voices/no-
country-for-old-people/
8. Thomas R. Klassen, Yunjeong Yang. Korea’s Retirement Predicament: The Ageing 
Tiger (in Eng).
9. International Journal of Mental Health Systems. 2014, Vol. 8 Issue 1. 12 June 2015 
(in Eng).
10. The Vostok Magazine. Старость в Южной Корее. http://vostalk.net/starost/ (in 
Rus).
11. BBC News. Korea’s hidden problem: Suicidal defectors. http://www.bbc.com/news/
magazine-34710403 (in Eng).
12. Erminia Colucci, David Lester. “Suicide and Culture: Understanding the Context” 
(in Eng).
13. News1 Korea. http://news1.kr/articles/?2436793 (in Kor).
14. The Guardian. Funerals for the living in bid to tackle South Korea’s high suicide 
rate (in Eng).
15. Walter C. Clemens Jr. “Complexity Science and World Affairs” (in Eng).
16. UNICEF Annual Report 2014. Kazakhstan (in Eng).
17. World Health Organization. Statistical profile of Kazakhstan (in Eng).
18. Institute for War and Peace Reporting. Kazakhstan: Concerns Over Adolescent Sui-
cides (in Eng).
19. The UN data. National suicide prevention strategies (in Eng).
20. World Health Organization. Media centre. Fact sheet N°398 (in Eng).
УДК 343.2/.7(574)


  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал