Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет67/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70

 

 

 

 

 

583 

Ecosystems and sustainable development 

Ecosystems and populations 

 

The term ecosystem (or ecological system) refers to communities of organisms 

and their environment. Ecosystems can vary greatly in size. Small ecosystems occur 

in  tidal  pools,  in  a  back  yard  compost  pile,  or  in  the  rumen  of  an  individual  cow. 

Larger ecosystems can include a lake or forest. Landscape-scale ecosystems comprise 

still-larger  regions.  Ultimately,  all  of  Earth's  life  and  its  physical  environment 

represents an ecosystem known as the biosphere. 

With so much variation in what constitutes an ecosystem, it is useful to define 

the barrier of the system that is being studied. Depending on the specific interests of 

an ecologist, an ecosystem  might be delineated as the shoreline vegetation around a 

lake, or perhaps the entire water body, or maybe the lake plus all the land that drains 

into  the  lake  (a  watershed).Ecosystems  take  various  forms  of  energy  and  simple 

inorganic materials, and create relatively focused combinations of these, occurring as 

the  total  amount  of  biological  material  (the  biomass)  of  plants,  animals,  and 

microorganisms. Solar electromagnetic energy, captured by the chlorophyll of green 

plants,  is  a  common  energy  source  of  many  ecosystems.  The  most  important  of  the 

simple  inorganic  materials  are  carbon  dioxide,  water,  and  ions  or  small  molecules 

containing  nitrogen,  phosphorus,  potassium,  calcium,  magnesium,  sulfur,  and  some 

other nutrients. Virtually all ecosystems (and life itself) rely on inputs of solar energy 

to  drive  the  physiological  processes  by  which  biomass  is  synthesized  from  simple 

molecules.  To  carry  out  their  various  functions,  ecosystems  also  need  access  to 

nutrients. Unlike energy, which can only flow through an ecosystem, nutrients can be 

utilized repeatedly. Through biogeochemical cycles, nutrients are recycled from dead 

biomass  back  into  living  organisms.  One  of  the  greatest  challenges  facing  humans 

and their civilization is understanding the fundamentals of ecosystem organization—

how  they  function  and  how  they  are  structured.  This  knowledge  is  absolutely 

necessary if humans are to design systems that allow a sustainable utilization of the 

products and services of ecosystems. An example of a disastrous influence of humans 

on an ecosystem is the collapse of the cod fishery on the Grand Banks. This expanse 

of the Atlantic Ocean off the Eastern Coast of Maine and Atlantic Canada was once 

home  to  seemingly  unlimited  numbers  of  cod.  However,  over  centuries  destructive 

fishing  practices  and  overfishing  decimated  the  cod  stock  to  the  point  where  the 

species  became  nearly  extinct.  As  of  2013,  cod  stocks  have  not  recovered  to 

sustainable levels. 

Populations 

A population comprises all the individuals of a given species in a specific area 

or  region  at  a  certain  time.  Its  significance  is  more  than  that  of  a  number  of 

individuals  because  not  all  individuals  are  identical.  Populations  contain  genetic 

variation  within  themselves  and  between  other  populations.  Even  fundamental 

genetic characteristics such as hair color or size may differ slightly from individual to 

individual.  More  importantly,  not  all  members  of  the  population  are  equal  in  their 

ability to survive and reproduce.  

Communities  


584 

Community refers to all the populations in a specific area or region at a certain 

time. Its structure involves many types of interactions among species. Some of these 

involve  the  acquisition  and  use  of  food,  space,  or  other  environmental  resources. 

Others  involve  nutrient  cycling  through  all  members  of  the  community  and  mutual 

regulation  of  population  sizes.  In  all  of  these  cases,  the  structured  interactions  of 

populations  lead  to  situations  in  which  individuals  are  thrown  into  life  or  death 

struggles. In general, ecologists believe that a community that has a high diversity is 

more  complex  and  stable  than  a  community  that  has  a  low  diversity.  This  theory  is 

founded on the observation that the food webs of communities of high diversity are 

more  interconnected.  Greater  interconnectivity  causes  these  systems  to  be  more 

resilient to disturbance. If a species is removed, those species that relied on it for food 

have  the  option  to  switch  to  many  other  species  that  occupy  a  similar  role  in  that 

ecosystem.  In  a  low  diversity  ecosystem,  possible  substitutes  for  food  may  be  non-

existent or limited in abundance. 

Ecosystems  

Ecosystems  are  dynamic  entities  composed  of  the  biological  community  and 

the  a  biotic  environment.  An  ecosystem's  a  biotic  and  biotic  composition  and 

structure is determined by the state of a number of interrelated environmental factors. 

Changes in any of these factors (for example: nutrient availability, temperature, light 

intensity,  grazing  intensity,  and  species  population  density)  will  result  in  dynamic 

changes to the nature of these systems. For example, a fire in the temperate deciduous 

forest completely changes the structure of that system. There are no longer any large 

trees, most of the mosses, herbs, and shrubs that occupy the forest floor are gone, and 

the  nutrients  that  were  stored  in  the  biomass  are  quickly  released  into  the  soil, 

atmosphere  and  hydrologic  system.  After  a  short  time  of  recovery,  the  community 

that  was once large mature trees  now  becomes  a  community  of  grasses,  herbaceous 

species, and tree seedlings. 

What is an Ecosystem?  

An ecosystem includes all of the living things (plants, animals and organisms) 

in  a  given  area,  interacting  with  each  other,  and  also  with  their  non-living 

environments  (weather,  earth,  sun,  soil,  climate,  and  atmosphere).  In  an  ecosystem, 

each organism has its' own niche or role to play. 

Consider a small puddle at the back of your home. In it, you may find all sorts 

of  living  things,  from  microorganisms  to  insects  and  plants.  These  may  depend  on 

non-living  things  like  water,  sunlight,  turbulence  in  the  puddle,  temperature, 

atmospheric  pressure  and  even  nutrients  in  the  water  for  life.  (Click  here  to  see  the 

five basic needs of living things)  

This  is  very  complex,  wonderful  interaction  of  living  things  and  their 

environment  has  been  the  foundations  of  energy  flow  and  recycle  of  carbon  and 

nitrogen. 

Anytime  a  ‘stranger’  (living  thing(s)  or  external  factor  such  as  rise  in 

temperature)  is  introduced  to  an  ecosystem,  it  can  be  disastrous  to  that  ecosystem. 

This  is  because  the  new  organism  (or  factor)  can  distort  the  natural  balance  of  the 

interaction and potentially harm or destroy the ecosystem. Click to read on ecosystem 

threats (opens in new page). 



585 

Usually,  biotic  members  of  an  ecosystem,  together  with  their  biotic  factors 

depend on each other. This means the absence of one member or one biotic factor can 

affect all parties of the ecosystem.  

Unfortunately, ecosystems have been disrupted, and even destroyed by natural 

disasters such as fires, floods, storms and volcanic eruptions. Human activities have 

also contributed to the disturbance of many ecosystems and biomes.  

 

Scales of Ecosystems 



 

Ecosystems  come  in  indefinite  sizes.  It  can  exist  in  a  small  area  such  as 

underneath a rock, a decaying tree trunk, or a pond in your village, or it can exist in 

large forms such as an entire rain forest. Technically, the Earth can be called a huge 

ecosystem. 

The  illustration  above  shows  an  example  of  a  small  (decaying  tree  trunk) 

ecosystem 

To make things simple, let us classify ecosystems into three main scales. 

 Micro:  

A small scale ecosystem such as a pond, puddle, tree trunk, under a rock etc. 

Mess:  

A medium scale ecosystem such as a forest or a large lake. 



 Biome:  

A  very  large  ecosystem  or  collection  of  ecosystems  with  similar  biotic  and  a 

biotic  factors  such  as  an  entire  rainforest  with  millions  of  animals  and  trees,  with 

many different water bodies running through them. 

 

Sustainable development. Nature protection 

 

Sustainable  development  is  a  process  for  meeting  human  development  goals 



while  sustaining  the  ability  of  natural  systems  to  continue  to  provide  the  natural 

resources  and  ecosystem  services  upon  which  the  economy  and  society  depends. 

While the modern concept of sustainable development is derived most strongly from 

the  1987  Brundtland  Report,  it  is  rooted  in  earlier  ideas  about  sustainable  forest 

management  and  twentieth  century  environmental  concerns.  As  the  concept 

developed,  it  has  shifted  to  focus  more  on  economic  development,  social 

development and environmental protection. 

Sustainable  development  is  the  organizing  principle  for  sustaining  finite 

resources  necessary  to  provide  for  the  needs  of  future  generations  of  life  on  the 

planet.  It  is  a  process  that  envisions  a  desirable  future  state  for  human  societies  in 

which  living  conditions  and  resource-use  continue  to  meet  human  needs  without 

undermining the "integrity, stability and beauty" of natural biotic systems. 



586 

 

The  Blue  Marble,  photographed  from  Apollo  17  in  1972,  quickly  became  an 



icon of environmental conservation.  

Sustainability  can  be  defined  as  the  practice  of  maintaining  processes  of 

productivity indefinitely—natural or human made—by replacing resources used with 

resources  of  equal  or  greater  value  without  degrading  or  endangering  natural  biotic 

systems.

[2]


 Sustainable development ties together concern for the carrying capacity of 

natural  systems  with  the  social,  political,  and  economic  challenges  faced  by 

humanity.  Sustainability  science  is  the  study  of  the  concepts  of  sustainable 

development and environmental science. There is an additional focus on the present 

generations'  responsibility  to  regenerate,  maintain  and  improve  planetary  resources 

for use by future generations.

[3]

 

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 



On  September  2015,  the  United  Nations  General  Assembly  formally  adopted 

the  "universal,  integrated  and  transformative"  2030  Agenda  for  Sustainable 

Development, a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

 

These  icons  represent  the  17  headline  SDGs.  There  are  169  targets  under  the 



goals. 

The goals are to be implemented and achieved in every country from the year 

2016 to 2030. 

 

Dimensions 

 

 

Scheme 



of 

sustainable 

development:  at  the  confluence  of 

three constituent parts. (2006) 



587 

Sustainable development, or sustainability, has been described in terms of three 

spheres,  dimensions,  domains  or  pillars,  i.e.  the  environment,  the  economy  and 

society.  The  three-sphere  framework  was  initially  proposed  by  the  economist  René 

Passet in 1979.

]

 It has also been worded as "economic, environmental and social" or 



"ecology, economy and equity. This has been expanded by some authors to include a 

fourth pillar of culture, institutions or governance.  

 

Environment protection 

 

Some  hundreds  of  years  ago  people  lived  in  harmony  with  nature,  because 



industry was not much developed. Today, however, the contradictions between man 

and nature are dramatic. 

The  twenty  first  century  is  a  century  of  the  scientific  and  technological 

progress.  The  achievements  of  the  mankind  in  mechanization  and  automation  of 

industrial processes, in chemical industry and conquering outer space, in the creation 

of atomic power stations and ships are amazing. But at the same time, this progress 

gave birth to a very serious problem – the problem of environment. 

Ecology  and  the  contamination  of  environment,  is  concerned  with  climate, 

over-population in certain areas, deaths of plant and animals, chemical contamination 

of seas, lakes and rivers as well as atomic experiments and dumping of atomic waste 

from power stations. Floods, unexpected draughts, and the greenhouse effect are the 

next reasons. 

There  are  many  consequences  of  damaging  the  environment.  One  of  them  is 

acid  rain.  Another  one  is  water  shortage  resulting  from  abuse  of  arable  lands  in 

agriculture. The third one is destroying the ozone layer of the Earth through pollution 

from factories and plants. The fourth problem is damage o water and soils. The fifth 

one is damage to wildlife: numerous species of animals and plants can disappear. At 

last, the most serious danger arising from damaging the environment is the result of 

the  abovementioned  consequences.  This  is  the  danger  for  the  life  and  health  of  the 

man. 


The  protection  of  natural  resources  and  wildlife  is  becoming  a  political 

programme  in  every  country.  Numerous  anti-pollution  acts  passed  in  different 

countries  led  to  considerable  improvements  in  environment.  In  many  countries 

purifying  systems  for  treatment  of  industrial  waters  have  been  installed,  measures 

have been taken to protect rivers and seas from oil waters. 

But  the  environmental  problems  have  grown  beyond  the  concern  of  a  single 

country. Their solution requires the co-operation of all nations. 

If we are unable to learn to use the environment carefully and protect it from 

damage caused by man’s activities, very soon we’ll have no world to live in. 

 

New materials and technologies on service of the person 

Dependence on properties of substances: their composition and structure 

 

A  living  organism  has  a  material  structure  to  provide  an  environment  for 

complicated  chemistry  of  living.  Chemical  and physical  reactions  provide energy  to 


588 

maintain  living  functions  and  to  renew  structural  material.  Thus,  consideration  of 

biological properties is a natural extension of physical and chemical properties. 

To  a  large  extend,  biological  functions  of  any  materials  are  related  to  their 

chemical  and  physical  properties.  However,  reactions  in  biological  systems  are 

catalyzed  by  enzymes.  Furthermore,  products  of  one  reaction  may  be  reactants  for 

another  in  a  complicate  scheme  of  reactions  to  maintain  live.  Malfunction  of  a 

reaction  causes  trouble,  leading  to  disease  or  death.  Thus,  biological  properties 

deserve special consideration. 

 

Biological materials and biomaterial 



 

Plasma, membrane, tissue, protein, lipid, enzyme, the digestive system, and the 

central  nervous  systems  are  some  examples  of  biological  materials,  for  which 

properties for consideration include growth and decay, turn over time, biological half 

life,  retention  time,  composition  and  its  change,  and  active  ingredient.  These  are 

manifestation  of  physical  and  chemical properties  of biological  materials.  However, 

biological  properties  allow  us  to  identify  and  solve  the  biological  problems. 

Biological materials had been studied by biologists, chemists, and engineers from the 

macroscopic, molecular, and functional view points. 

The  chemistry  of  living  is  complex,  and  properties  of  biological  materials 

towards biomaterials are of great interest. The general reaction of biological materials 

towards  foreign  biomaterials  is expel  (or  rejection).  Living tissues form  a  thin  layer 

around  the  inert  biomaterial,  but  materials  that  irritate  the  tissues  causes 

inflammation.  Most  pure  metals  evoke  severe  tissue  reaction  due  to  their  redox 

reactions.  However,  aluminum  and  titanium  are  metals  of  choice,  because  the 

formation of a thin oxide layer on their surface made them inert. Similarly, ceramics 

are compatible to body fluid because they are made of the metal oxides. The nature of 

the surface also affects the biological properties, rough ones enable tight attachment 

of tissues. 

Biological  activities  of  materials  can  be  divided  according  to  biological 

functions.  Substances  that  provide  nutrition,  energy,  and  structural  need  are  called 

food,  whereas  those  that  disrupt  the  normal  functions  are  called  toxins.  Substances 

used to correct the abnormal biological functions are called medicines. 

 

Polymers 

 

The  term  "polymer"  derives  from  the  ancient  Greek  word 



πολύς  (polus, 

meaning  "many,  much")  and 

μέρος  (meros,  meaning  "parts"),  and  refers  to  a 

molecule  whose  structure  is  composed  of  multiple  repeating  units,  from  which 

originates a characteristic of high relative molecular mass and attendant properties.  

Most polymers have the form of long, flexible chains. Having found out that, 

chemists began synthesizing artificial polymers. This has led to the establishment of 

industries  producing  synthetic  fibres  and  numerous  polymeric  materials,  many  of 

which were less expensive and superior in various ways to the natural materials.  

Life depends fundamentally on organic polymers. These polymers provide not 



589 

only food but also clothing, shelter and transportation.  

Indeed  nearly  all  the  material  needs  of  man  could  be  supplied  by  natural 

organic products. The list of these materials and things made of them might br very 

long: wood, fur, leather, wool, cotton, silk, rubber, oils, paper, paints and so on. The 

organic polymers from which such things could be made include proteins, cellulose, 

starch, resins, and a few other classes of compounds. Because of the complexity and 

fragility  of  their  molecules, the natural organic polymers,  although  known  and  used 

for ages. 

Synthetic  polymers  now  available  already  possess  several  of  the  properties 

required  in  a  structural  material.  They  are  light  in  weight,  easily  transported,  easily 

repaired,  highly  resistant  to  corrosion  and  solvents,  and  satisfactory  resistant  to 

moisture.  It  would  be  necessary  to  add  that  they  have  long-lived  durability  and 

resistance to high temperatures 

One  could  list  the  principal  products:  such  as  fibres,  synthetic  rubbers, 

coatings,  adhesives  and  a  lot  of  materials  called  “plastics”.  Plastics  and  synthetic 

coating are already in common use. It is desirable that they should be used on a large 

scale, and get further development.  



 

Development of drugs 

 

Drug development is the process of bringing a new pharmaceutical drug to the 

market  once  a  lead  compound  has  been  identified  through  the  process  of  drug 

discovery. It includes pre-clinical research on microorganisms and animals, filing for 

regulatory  status,  such  as  via  the  United  States  Food  and  Drug  Administration  for 

aninvestigational new drug to initiate clinical trials on humans, and may include the 

step of obtaining regulatory approval with a new drug application to market the drug. 

 

Timeline showing the various drug approval tracks and research phases 



Pre-clinical 

New chemical entities (NCEs, also known as new molecular entities or NMEs) 

are  compounds  that  emerge  from  the  process  of  drug  discovery.  These  have 

promising  activity  against  a  particular  biological  target  that  is  important  in  disease. 

However,  little  is  known  about  the  safety,  toxicity,  pharmacokinetics,  and 

metabolism of this NCE in humans. It is the function of drug development to assess 

all  of  these  parameters  prior  to  human  clinical  trials.  A  further  major  objective  of 

drug development is to recommend the dose and schedule for the first use in a human 

clinical trial ("first-in-man" [FIM] or First Human Dose [FHD]). 

In addition, drug development must establish the physicochemical properties of 



590 

the NCE: its chemical makeup, stability, and solubility. Manufacturers must optimize 

the  process  they  use  to  make  the  chemical  so  they  can  scale  up  from  a  medicinal 

chemist producing milligrams, to manufacturing on the kilogram and ton scale. They 

further  examine  the  product  for  suitability  to  package  as  capsules,  tablets,  aerosol, 

intramuscular  inject  able,  subcutaneous  inject  able,  or  intravenous  formulations. 

Together,  these  processes  are  known  in  preclinical  development  as  chemistry, 

manufacturing, and control (CMC). 

Many  aspects  of  drug  development  focus  on  satisfying  the  regulatory 

requirements  of  drug  licensing  authorities.  These  generally  constitute  a  number  of 

tests designed to determine the major toxicities of a novel compound prior to first use 

in  humans.  It  is  a  legal  requirement  that  an  assessment  of  major  organ  toxicity  be 

performed (effects on the heart and lungs, brain, kidney, liver and digestive system), 

as well as effects on other parts of the body that might be affected by the drug (e.g., 

the skin if the new drug is to be delivered through the skin). Increasingly, these tests 

are made using in vitro methods (e.g., with isolated cells), but many tests can only be 

made  by  using  experimental  animals  to  demonstrate  the  complex  interplay  of 

metabolism and drug exposure on toxicity. 

The  information  is  gathered  from  this  pre-clinical  testing,  as  well  as 

information on CMC, and submitted to regulatory authorities (in the US, to the FDA), 

as an Investigational New Drug application or IND.  



1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал