Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет66/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70

Scope 

 

Green  Chemistry  provides  a  unique  forum  for  the  publication  of  innovative 

research on the development of alternative sustainable technologies.  

The  scope  of  Green  Chemistry  is  based  on,  but  not  limited  to,  the  definition 

proposed  by  Anastas  and  Warner  (Green  Chemistry:  Theory  and  Practice,  P  T 

Anastas and J C Warner, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998). Green chemistry is 

the utilisation of a set of principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of 

hazardous  substances  in  the  design,  manufacture  and  application  of  chemical 

products. 



Green  Chemistry  is  at  the  frontiers  of  this  interdisciplinary  science  and 

publishes research that attempts to reduce the environmental impact of the chemical 

enterprise  by  developing  a  technology  base  that  is  inherently  non-toxic  to  living 

things  and  the  environment.  Submissions  on  all  aspects  of  research  relating  to  the 

endeavor are welcome. 

The  journal  publishes  original  and  significant  cutting-edge  research  that  is 

likely to be of wide general appeal. Coverageincludes the following, butis not limited 

to: 


-

 

the application of innovative technology to establish industrial procedures 



-

 

the development of environmentally improved routes, synthetic methods and 



processes to important products 

-

 



the design of new, greener and safer chemicals and materials 

-

 



the use of sustainable resources 

-

 



the use of biotechnology alternatives to chemistry-based solutions 

-

 



methodologies  and  tools  for  measuring  environmental  impact  and 

application to real world examples 

-

 

chemical aspects of renewable energy 



 

 

reading  



Substance structure 

Substance 

 

Substance [sub'-stuns] is the material, or matter, of which something is made. 



576 

Substances are physical things that can be seen, touched, or measured. They are made 

up  of  one  or  more  elemental  parts.  Iron,  aluminium,  water  and  air  are  examples  of 

substances. 

 

Steam and liquid water are two different forms of the same chemical substance, 



water. 

The  Latin  word  substantia  -  a  translation  of  the  Greek  word  for  the  essence 

(ousia), and in Latin to describe the essence of using the word essentia.  

Did you know when you are breathing you are actually inhaling elements? The 

air  you  breathe  is  made  up  of  many  elements  like  oxygen,  nitrogen,  and  argon. 

Elements are everywhere. They are the building blocks of everything on Earth: your 

dog, the mountains, your car, your eyes, and, yes, even beer. In this lesson, we will 

discuss what an element is, how elements are written as symbols, and how they are 

the building blocks of all matter.  

 

Substances 

 

Substances are distinguished by their properties – colour, smell, taste, specific 



gravity, greater or lesser hardnessmelting and boiling pointsvolatility, etc. 

For example, in describing the properties of sugar, one can state that sugar is a 

hard,  brittle  substance,  white  in  colour,  sweet  to  the  taste,  without  odour,  easily 

soluble in water, heavier than water and it turns brown when it is heated, etc. 

In order to learn the properties of a substance one must have it in its pure form. 

Even  small  admixtures  of  foreign  substances  may  change  the  properties  of  a 

substance. For example: pure water is both colourless and transparent, but if a drop of 

milk  is  added  to  a  glass  of  water,  the  water  becomes  clouded;  if  a  drop  of  ink  is 

added,  the  water  becomes  coloured.  All  the  enumerated  properties  are  not  those  of 

water but they are the properties of the admixtures. 

In some cases, one may see at once that a substance is heterogeneous, that is, a 

mixture of different substances. 

Granite, cement, petroleum are examples of non-homogeneous materials; they 

consist of mixtures of substances. Thus, granite is a mixture of varying quantities of 

silica, feldspar, and mica, each of which possesses its own set of properties. Coal is 

not a substances too because different samples contain different relatives amounts of 

ash, water, carbon, and other components.  

Every  materials,  therefore,  consists  of  a  single  (pure)  substance,  or  it  is  a 

mixture  of  two  or  more  substances,  each  of  which  retains  in  the  mixture  its  own 

characteristic properties.  

 


577 

Atomic structure 

 

 What Is an Element? 

An  element  is  a  pure  substance  that  cannot  be  broken  down  by  chemical 

methods  into  simpler  components.  For  example,  the  element  gold  cannot be  broken 

down  into  anything  other  than  gold.  If  you  kept  hitting  gold  with  a  hammer,  the 

pieces would get smaller, but each piece will always be gold. You can think of each 

kind  of  element  having  its  own  unique  fingerprint  making  it  different  than  other 

elements. Elements consist of only one type of atom. An atom is the smallest particle 

of an element that still has the same properties of that element. All atoms of a specific 

element have exactly the same chemical makeup, size, and mass. There are a total of 

118 elements, with the most abundant elements on Earth being helium and hydrogen. 

Many  elements occur  naturally  on  Earth; however,  some  are  created in  a  laboratory 

by  scientists  by  nuclear  processes.  Elements  Are  Written  as  Symbols  Instead  of 

writing  the  whole  elemental  name,  elements  are  often  written  as  a  symbol.  For 

example,  O  is  the  symbol  for  oxygen,  C  is  the  symbol  for  carbon,  and  H  is  the 

symbol  for  hydrogen.  Not  all  elements  have  just  one  letter  as  the  symbol,  but  have 

two letters - like Al is the symbol for aluminum and Ni is the symbol for nickel. The 

first  letter  is  always  capitalized,  but  the  second  letter  is  not.  Symbol  names  do  not 

always  match  the  letters  in  the  elemental  name.  For  example,  Fe  is  the  symbol  for 

iron and Au is the symbol for gold. These symbol names are derived from the Latin 

names for those elements. 

 

Radioactivity. Nuclear reactions 



 

Radioactivity was discovered in 1896 by the French scientist Henri Becquerel, 

while working with phosphorescent materials. These materials glow in the dark after 

exposure to light, and he suspected that the glow produced in cathode ray tubes by X-

rays might be associated with phosphorescence. He wrapped a photographic plate in 

black paper and placed various phosphorescent salts on it. All results were negative 

until  he  used  uranium  salts.  The  uranium  salts  caused  a  blackening  of  the  plate  in 

spite of the plate being wrapped in black paper. These radiations were given the name 

"Becquerel Rays". 

It  soon  became  clear  that  the  blackening  of  the  plate  had  nothing  to  do  with 

phosphorescence,  as  the  blackening  was  also  produced  by  non-phosphorescent  salts 

of uranium and metallic uranium. It became clear from these experiments that there 

was a form of invisible radiation that could pass through paper and was causing the 

plate to react as if exposed to light. 

At  first,  it  seemed  as  though  the  new  radiation  was  similar,  then  recently 

discovered  X-rays.  Further  research  by  Becquerel,  Ernest  Rutherford,  Paul  Villard, 

Pierre  Curie,  Marie  Curie,  and  others  showed  that  this  form  of  radioactivity  was 

significantly  more  complicated.  Rutherford  was  the  first  to  realize  that  all  such 

elements  decay  in  accordance  with  the  same  mathematical  exponential  formula. 

Rutherford and his student Frederick Soddy were the first to realize that many decay 

processes resulted in the transmutation of one element to another. Subsequently, the 


578 

radioactive  displacement  law  of  Fajans  and  Soddy  was  formulated  to  describe  the 

products of alpha and beta decay. 

The  early  researchers  also  discovered  that  many  other  chemical  elements, 

besides  uranium,  have  radioactive  isotopes.  A  systematic  search  for  the  total 

radioactivity in uranium ores also guided Pierre and Marie Curie to isolate two new 

elements: polonium and radium. Except for the radioactivity of radium, the chemical 

similarity of radium to bariummade these two elements difficult to distinguish. 

Marie and Pierre Curie’s study of radioactivity is an important factor in science 

and  medicine. After their research on Becquerel's rays led them to the discovery on 

both radium and polonium, they coined the term "radioactivity." Their research on the 

penetrating rays in uranium and discovery of radium launched an era of using radium 

for  treatment  of  cancer.  Their  exploration  of  radium  could  be  seen  as  the  first 

peaceful use of nuclear energy and the start of modern nuclear medicine. 



 

 

A  nuclear  reaction  is  considered  to  be  the  process  in  which  two  nuclear 

particles  (two  nuclei  or  a  nucleus  and  a  nucleon)  interact  to  produce  two  or  more 

nuclear  particles  or  X-rays  (gamma  rays).  Thus,  a  nuclear  reaction  must  cause  a 

transformation  of  at  least  one  nuclide  to  another.  Sometimes  if  a  nucleus  interacts 

with  another  nucleus  or  particle  without  changing  the  nature  of  any  nuclide,  the 

process is referred to a nuclear scattering, rather than a nuclear reaction. Perhaps the 

most notable nuclear reactions are the nuclear fusion reactions of light elements that 

power  the  energy  production  of  stars  and  the  Sun.  Natural  nuclear  reactions  occur 

also in the interaction between cosmic rays and matter. 

The most notable man-controlled nuclear reaction is the fission reaction which 

occurs  in  nuclear  reactors.  Nuclear  reactors  are  devices  to  initiate  and  control  a 

nuclear  chain  reaction,  but  there  are  not  only  manmade  devices.  The  world’s  first 

nuclear  reactor  operated  about  two  billion  years  ago.  The  natural  nuclear  reactor 

formed  at  Oklo  in  Gabon,  Africa,  when  a  uranium-rich  mineral  deposit  became 

flooded  with  groundwater  that  acted  as  a  neutron  moderator,  and  a  nuclear  chain 

reaction started. These fission reactions were sustained for hundreds of thousands of 

years,  until  a  chain  reaction  could  no  longer  be  supported.  This  was  confirmed  by 

existence  of  isotopes  of  the  fission-product  gas  xenon  and  by  different  ratio  of  U-

235/U-238 (enrichment of natural uranium). 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural 

resources and 

power 

Natural 

resources 

 

Natural  resources  are  resources  that  exist  without  the  actions  of  humankind. 

This includes all valued characteristics such as magnetic, gravitational, and electrical 


579 

properties  and  forces.  On  earth  we  include  sunlight,  atmosphere,  water,  land,  air 

(includes all minerals) along with all vegetation and animal life that naturally subsists 

upon or within therefore identified characteristics and substances. 

Natural resources may be further classified in different ways. Natural resources 

are materials and components (something that can be used) that can be found within 

the  environment.  Every  man-made  product  is  composed  of  natural  resources  (at  its 

fundamental  level).  A  natural  resource  may  exist  as  a  separate  entity  such  as  fresh 

water,  and  air,  as  well  as  a  living  organism  such  as  a  fish,  or  it  may  exist  in  an 

alternate  form  which  must  be  processed  to  obtain  the  resource  such  as  metal  ores, 

mineral oil, and most forms of energy. 

There  is  much  debate  worldwide  over  natural  resource  allocations;  this  is 

particularly  true  during  periods  of  increasing  scarcity  and  shortages  (depletion  and 

overconsumption of resources) but also because the exportation of natural resources 

is the basis for many economies (particularly for developed countries). 

Some natural resources such as sunlight and air can be found everywhere, and 

are  known  as  ubiquitous  resources.  However,  most  resources  only  occur  in  small 

sporadic  areas,  and  are  referred  to  as  localized  resources.  There  are  very  few 

resources that are considered inexhaustible (will not run out in foreseeable future) – 

these are solar radiation, geothermal energy, and air (though access to clean air may 

not  be).  The  vast  majority  of  resources  are  theoretically  exhaustible,  which  means 

they have a finite quantity and can be depleted if managed improperly. 

In recent years, the depletion of natural resources has become a major focus of 

governments  and  organizations  such  as  the  United  Nations.  This  is  evident  in  the 

UN's  Agenda  21  Section  Two,  which  outlines  the  necessary  steps  to  be  taken  by 

countries  to  sustain  their  natural  resources.  The  depletion  of  natural  resources  is 

considered to be a sustainable development issue. The term sustainable development 

has many interpretations, most notably the Brundtland Commission's 'to ensure that it 

meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations 

to  meet  their  own  needs',  however  in  broad  terms  it  is  balancing  the  needs  of  the 

planet's  people  and  species  now  and  in  the  future.  In  regards  to  natural  resources, 

depletion  is  of  concern  for  sustainable  development  as  it  has  the  ability  to  degrade 

current environments and potential to impact the needs of future generations. 

The  conservation  of  natural  resources  is  the  fundamental  problem.  Unless  we 

solve that problem, it will avail us little to solve all others. 

Natural resources can be consumed directly or indirectly. For instance, humans 

depend directly  on  forests  for  food, biomass, health,  recreation  and  increased living 

comfort. Indirectly forests act as climate control, flood control, storm protection and 

nutrient cycling.  

 

Raw materials 



 

Sometimes,  natural  resources  can  be  used  as  raw  materials  to  produce 

something.  For  instance,  we  can  use  a  tree  from  the  forest  to  produce  timber.  The 

timber  is  then  used  to  produce  wood  for  furniture  or  pulp  for  paper  and  paper 

products. In this scenario, the tree is the raw material. 


580 

Every  item  in  your  home  was  made  from  a  raw  material  that  came  from  a 

natural  resource.  The  tea  mug,  electricity  at  home,  bread,  clothes,  you  name  them: 

each of them came from a natural resource. 

Natural resources come in many forms. It may be a solid, liquid or gas. It may 

also  be  organic  or  inorganic.  It  may  also  be  metallic  or  non-metallic.  It  may  be 

renewable or non-renewable. 

Renewable and Non-renewable Resources 

All  natural  resources  fall  under  two  main  categories:  renewable  and  non-

renewable resources. The table below will help us understand this better.  

Renewable resources  

Renewable resources are those that are constantly available (like water) or can 

be  reasonably  replaced  or  recovered,  like  vegetative  lands.  Animals  are  also 

renewable because with a bit of care, they can reproduce off springs to replace adult 

animals.  Even  though  some  renewable  resources  can  be  replaced,  they  may  take 

many years and that does not make them renewable.  

If  renewable  resources  come  from  living  things,  (such  as  trees  and  animals) 

they can be called organic renewable resources. 

If  renewable  resources  come  from  non-living  things,  (such  as  water,  sun  and 

wind) they can be called inorganic renewable resources. 

 Non-renewable resources 

Non-renewable resources are those that cannot easily be replaced once they are 

destroyed.  Examples  include  fossil  fuels.  Minerals  are  also  non-renewable  because 

even  though  they  form  naturally  in  a  process  called  the  rock  cycle,  it  can  take 

thousands  of  years,  making  it  non-renewable.  Some  animals  can  also  be  considered 

non-renewable, because if people hunt for a particular species without ensuring their 

reproduction,  they  will  be  extinct.  This  is  why  we  must  ensure  that  we  protect 

resources that are endangered.  

Non-renewable resources can be called inorganic resources if they come from 

non-living things. Examples include include, minerals, wind, land, soil and rocks. 

Some non-renewable resources come from living things — such as fossil fuels. 

They can be called organic non-renewable resources.  

 Metallic and Non-metallic Resources 

Inorganic  resources  may  be  metallic  or  non-metallic.  Metallic  minerals  are 

those  that  have  metals  in  them.  They  are  harder,  shiny,  and  can  be  melted  to  form 

new  products.  Examples  are  iron,  copper  and  tin.  Non-metallic  minerals  have  no 

metals in them. They are softer and do not shine. Examples include clay and coal. 

Why are Natural Resources so important? 

Natural resources are available to sustain the very complex interaction between 

living  things  and  non-living  things.  Humans  also  benefit  immensely  from  this 

interaction.  All  over  the  world,  people  consume  resources  directly  or  indirectly. 

Developed countries consume resources more than under-developed countries. 

In  what  form  do  people  consume  natural  resources?  The  three  major  forms 

include  

food and drink, housing and infrastructure, and mobility. These three make up 

more than 60% of resource use. 



581 

Natural Resource 

Products or Services 

Air 


Wind energy, tires 

Animals 


Foods (milk, cheese, steak, bacon) and clothing (wool 

sweaters, silk shirts, leather belts) 

Coal 

Electricity 



Minerals 

Coins, wire, steel, aluminum cans, jewelry 

Natural gas 

Electricity, heating 

Oil 

Electricity, fuel for cars and airplanes, plastic 



Plants 

Wood, paper, cotton clothing, fruits, vegetables 

Sunlight 

Solar power, photosynthesis 

Water 

Hydroelectric energy, drinking, cleaning 



 

Power resources 

 

Since  1933  the  World  Energy  Council  has  published  a  report  presenting 

statistics  for  reserves,  and  production  of  various  resources  at  the  global  level.  The 

World  Energy  Resources  study  group  and  its  working  groups  collect  and  evaluate 

data on resources. It focuses on proven reserves, examines the evolving nature of the 

energy  mix  in  countries  worldwide  and  highlights  emerging  energy  sources  and 

technologies. 

The  World  Energy  Resources  report  is  a  strategic  publication  of  the  World 

Energy  Council  prepared  triennially  and  timed  for  release  at  each  World  Energy 

Congress.  It  offers  a  uniquely  global  perspective  on  twelve  major  resources.  This 

highly regarded publication is an essential tool for governments, industry, investors, 

NGOs and academia. 

As  energy  is  the  main  ‘fuel’  for  social  and  economic  development,  and  since 

energy-related  activities  have  significant  environmental  impacts,  it  is  important  for 

decision-makers to have access to reliable and accurate data in a user-friendly format. 

The  World  Energy  Council  has  for  decades  been  a  pioneer  in  the  field  of  energy 

resources and every three years publishes its World Energy Resources report (WER) 

[formerly  Survey  of  Energy  Resources  (SER)],  which  is  released  during  the  World 

Energy Congress. 

The  energy  sector  has  long  lead  times  and  therefore  any  long-term  strategy 

should be based on sound information and data. Detailed resource data, selected cost 

data  and  a  technology  overview  in  the  main  WER  report  provide  an  excellent 

foundation  for  assessing  different  energy  options  based  on  factual  information 

supplied by the WEC members from all over the world. 

The  work  is  divided  into  twelve  resource-specific  work  groups,  called 

Knowledge  Networks;  complemented  by  a  further  three  groups  investigating  the 



582 

cross-cutting  issues  of,  carbon  capture  and  storage,  energy  efficiency  and  energy 

storage.  These  Knowledge  Networks  provide  updated  data  for  the  website  and 

publications, as well as working on timely deep-dives with a resource focus. 

An example of a magnetic force is the pull that attracts metals to the magnet. 

Now,  the  electrical  field  induced  causes  waves,  called  electromagnetic  waves,  and 

they can travel through a vacuum (air), particles or solids. These waves resemble the 

ripple (mechanical) waves you see when you drop a rock into a swimming pool, but 

with electromagnetic waves, you do not see them, but you often can see the effect of 

it. The energy in the electromagnetic waves is what we call radiant energy. There are 

different kinds of electromagnetic waves and all of them have different wavelengths, 

properties, frequencies and power, and all interact with matter differently. The entire 

wave  system  from  the  lowest  frequency  to  the  highest  frequency  is  known  as  the 

electromagnetic  spectrum.  The  shorter  the  wavelength,  the  higher  its  frequency  and 

vice  versa.  White  light,  for  example,  is  a  form  of  radiant  energy,  and  its  frequency 

forms a tiny bit of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. What is radiant energy? 

When radiant energy comes into contact with matter, it changes the properties 

of  that  matter.  For  example,  when  micro-waves  (which  form  part  of  the  entire 

spectrum)  are  set  off  in  a  microwave  oven,  the  water  molecules  in  the  food  are 

charged  and  caused  to  vibrate  billions  of  times  per  second,  generating  heat,  that 

causes  the  food  to  cook.  The  microwave  oven  works  with  the  concept  of  radiant 

energy (electromagnetic waves). 

Energy Stored  

Energy  cannot  be  created  or  destroyed,  but  it  can  be  saved  in  various  forms. 

One way to store it is in the form of chemical energy in a battery. When connected in 

a circuit, energy stored in the battery is released to produce electricity. 

Energy Stored  

If  you  look  at  a  battery,  it  will  have  two  ends:  a  positive  terminal  and  a 

negative  terminal.  If  you  connect  the  two  terminals  with  wire,  a  circuit  is  formed. 

Electrons will flow through the wire and a current of electricity is produced. Energy 

can  also  be  stored  in  many  other  ways.  Batteries,  gasoline,  natural  gas,  food,  water 

towers, a wound up alarm clock, a Thermos flask with hot water and even pooh are 

all stores of energy. They can be transferred into other kinds of energy.  



1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал