Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет65/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70

 

Human  behavior  refers  to  the  array  of  every  physical  action  and  observable 

emotion  associated  with  individuals,  as  well  as  the  human  race  as  a  whole.  While 

specific  traits  of  one's  personality  and  temperament  may  be  more  consistent,  other 

behaviors  will  change  as  one  moves  from  birth  through  adulthood.  In  addition  to 

being dictated by age andgenetics, behavior, driven in part by thoughts and feelings, 

is  an  insight  into  individual  psyche,  revealing  among  other  things  attitudes  and 

values. Social behavior, a subset of human behavior, study the considerable influence 

of  social  interaction  and  culture.  Additional  influences  include  ethics,  encircling, 

authority, rapport, hypnosis, persuasion andcoercion. 

The  behavior  of  humans  (and  other  organisms  or  even  mechanisms)  falls 

within  a  range  with  some  behavior  being common,  some  unusual, some  acceptable, 

and some outside acceptable limits. In sociology, behavior in general includes actions 

having  no  meaning,  being  not  directed  at  other  people,  and  thus  all  basic  human 

actions. Behavior in this general sense should not be mistaken with social behavior, 

which  is  a  more  advanced  social  action,  specifically  directed  at  other  people.  The 

acceptability  of  behavior  depends  heavily  upon  social  norms  and  is  regulated  by 

various  means  of  social  control.  Human  behavior  is  studied  by  the  specialized 


569 

academi  disciplines  of  psychiatry,  psychology,  social  work,  sociology,  economics, 

and anthropology. 

Human  behavior  is  experienced  throughout  an  individual’s  entire  lifetime.  It 

includes  the  way  they  act  based  on  different  factors  such  as  genetics,  social  norms, 

core  faith,  and  attitude.  Behavior  is  impacted  by  certain  traits  each  individual  has. 

The traits vary from  person to person and can produce different actions or behavior 

from  each  person.  Social  norms  also  impact  behavior.  Due  to  the  inherently 

conformist nature of human society in general, humans are pressured into following 

certain  rules  and  displaying  certain  behaviors  in  society,  which  conditions  the  way 

people  behave.  Different  behaviors  are  deemed  to  be  either  acceptable  or 

unacceptable in different societies and cultures. Core faith can be perceived through 

the religion and philosophy of that individual. It shapes the way a person thinks and 

this  in  turn  results  in  different  human  behaviors.  Attitude  can  be  defined  as  "the 

degree to which the person has a favorable or unfavorable evaluation of the behavior 

in question."

[1]

 One's attitude is essentially a reflection of the behavior he or she will 



portray  in  specific  situations.  Thus,  human  behavior  is  greatly  influenced  by  the 

attitudes we use on a daily basis. 

 

Global Warming 

 

Light from the Sun passes through the atmosphere and warms Earth's surface. 



The  energy  associated  with  heating  is  re-radiated  as  infrared  light  absorbed  in  the 

atmosphere  by  greenhouse  gases,  including  carbon  dioxide  (CO2),  water  vapor, 

methane 

(CH4), 


ozone, 

nitrous 


oxide 

(N2O), 


and 

the 


human-

madechlorofluorocarbons  (CFCs).  This  atmospheric  warming  is  called  the 

greenhouse  effect  and  is  both  natural  and  essential  for  life  on  Earth.  Without  the 

greenhouse  effect,  Earth's  average  global  temperature  would  be  too  cold  to  support 

most forms of animal and plant life. However, an overabundance of greenhouse gases 

can increase the greenhouse effect and force abnormal global warming. 

Carbon dioxide--a by-product of burning fossil fuels and modern forests--is the 

most abundant greenhouse gas. Depending on the specific measurements, in the early 

twenty-first  century,  there  is  at  least  30  to  40  percent  more  CO

2

  in  the  atmosphere 



than  in  1850.  There  have  also  been  significant  increases  in  methane,  a  more  potent 

greenhouse gas. 

In  some  ways,  adding  greenhouse  gases  to  the  atmosphere  is  like  throwing 

another  blanket  on  Earth;  the  consequent  rise  in  global  temperature  is  known  as 

global warming. Despite the fact that climate is a complex system and climate models 

are difficult to construct, scientists must use climate models to predict the impacts of 

various concentrations of greenhouse gases on global warming, and in turn, on global 

climate.  Some  models  show  average  global  temperature  increasing  as  much  as  9 

degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius) by 2100. Because ocean water absorbs more 

heat than land, the Southern Hemisphere (which has more water) will warm less than 

the  Northern  Hemisphere,  hence,  any  temperature  increase  will  not  be  uniform. 

Atmospheric circulationpatterns will bring the greatest warming, as much as 14 to 18 

degrees Fahrenheit (8 to 10 degrees Celsius), to Earth's poles. 


570 

Since  the  IPCC's  2007  report,  new  scientific  findings  have  tended  to  worsen 

the  climate  change picture. In early  2009,  scientists at two  major gatherings--one  at 

the  University  of  Copenhagen,  the  other  at  the  annual  meeting  of  the  American 

Association for the Advancement of Science--presented evidence that climate change 

was occurring more quickly than the IPCC had conservatively forecasted in 2007. In 

addition,  carbon  dioxideemissions  increased  faster than the  IPCC's  most  pessimistic 

forecasts. 

Climate  change  skeptics  often  cite  Berkley  professor  of  physics  Richard  A. 

Muller's (1944-) past criticisms of the scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate 

change.  In  2010,  Muller  founded  the  Berkeley  Earth  Surface  Temperature  Study  to 

analyze  climate  data.  In  2012,  Muller  recanted  his  skepticism  over  anthropogenic 

climate  change,  titling  his  op-ed  in  the  New  York  Times  "The  Conversion  of  a 

Climate-Change Skeptic." Muller states that his work at Berkeley Earth provides the 

most  convincing  evidence  to  date  that  human  activity  over  the  last  250  years  has 

altered  Earth's  climate.  Muller  notes  that his  findings  go  even further  than  the 2007 

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report, which only 

attributed  temperature  rises  since  the  mid-twentieth  century  as  "very  likely"  due  to 

human activity. 

 

Climate History 

 

In  addition  to  concentrations  of  greenhouse  gases  in  the  atmosphere,  other 



factors  affecting  global  climate  include  Earth's  orbital  behavior,  the  positions  and 

topography of the continents, the temperature structure of the oceans, and the amount 

and types of life on Earth. During much of Earth's history, the climate was warm and 

humid  with  ice-free  poles.  Global  average  temperatures  were  about  9  degrees 

Fahrenheit  (5  degrees  Celsius)  higher  than  today.  Glaciers  covered  the  higher 

latitudes several times in the past, most recently during the Pleistocene Era (about 1.8 

million to 10,000 years ago), when up to 30 percent of the land was covered by ice. 

During  the  four glacial  advances of the  Pleistocene  Era, average  global temperature 

was  18  degrees  Fahrenheit  (10  degrees  Celsius)  lower  than  the  ancient  global 

average. During the three interglacial periods, global temperature was a degree or two 

warmer than today. 

 

Climate Change 



 

According  to  the  IPPC  and  the  vast  majority  of  global  leaders  and  climate 

experts,  climate  change  driven  by  AGW  will  fundamentally  impact  the  security, 

health,  and  global  economy  of  nations  for  generations.  Hundreds  of  millions  of 

people  and  scores  of  societies,  economies,  and  cultures  are  already  threatened  by 

rising sea levels, disrupted food production, extreme weather, and emergent diseases. 

While  such  irreversible  losses  as  speciesextinctions  and  lost  lives  cannot  be 

calculated in monetary terms, the most conservative estimates of the costs of climate 

change  over  the  next  century  range  in  the  trillions  of  dollars.  Moreover,  the  most 

severe  effects  of  climate  change  are  predicted  to  most  strongly  impact  the  world's 



571 

poorest and most vulnerable human populations. 

 

Abnormal warming 

Since  the  peak  of  the  last  glacial  advance  18,000  years  ago,  average  global 

temperature  has  risen  approximately  7  degrees  Fahrenheit  (4  degrees  Celsius), 

including  1.8  degrees  Fahrenheit  (1  degree  Celsius)  since  the  beginning  of  the 

Industrial  Revolution.  The  recent  increases  in  temperature  since  the  Industrial 

Revolution, however, are unprecedented and not accounted for by natural cycles. In 

fact,  recent  global  warming  has  taken  place  during  a  cycle  in  which  many  other 

factors favor global cooling. Although regions vary, according to the IPCC, between 

1905 and 2005, the overall average global surface temperature on Earth increased by 

approximately 1.33 degrees Fahrenheit (0.74 degrees Celsius). 

Predicted Impacts of Global Warming 

In  addition  to  ecological  impacts,  a  rapid  increase  in  global  average 

temperature will have profound effects on economic infrastructure as well as cultural 

and political systems. 

Warmer average temperatures 

According  to  most  climate  change  models,  not  all  regions  will  experience 

warmer  temperatures.  In  fact,  due  to  increasing  humidity  and  cloud  cover,  some 

regions  might  experience  (at  least  initially)  cooler  temperatures  and  increased 

snowfall. There also might be intervals during which temperature increases stop and 

perhaps  modestly  decline  (especially  after  significant  increases  or  sharp  spikes  in 

temperature, such as recorded in 1998). However, average global atmospheric, land, 

and sea temperatures are expected to rise over the next century. 

Warmer  temperatures  would  allow  tropical  and  subtropical  insects  to  expand 

their  ranges,  bringing  tropical  diseases  such  as  malaria,  encephalitis,  yellow  fever, 

and  dengue  fever  to  more  human  populations.  There  would  be  an  increase  in  heat-

related  diseases  and  deaths.  Agricultural  regions  might  become  too  dry  to  support 

crops,  and  food  production  all  over  the  world  would  be  forced  to  move  northward. 

This would result in a loss of current cropland of 10 to 50 percent and a decline in the 

global yield of key food crops of 10 to 70 percent. 

Most  computer  models  of  global  climate  predict  that  high  latitudes  will 

experience the greatest intensity of climatic warming. Ecologists have suggested that 

the  warming  of  northern  ecosystems  could  induce  a  positive  feedback  to  climate 

change.  For  example,  the  huge  expanse  of  boreal  forest  and  arctic  tundra  normally 

forms  sinks,  or  reservoirs,  that  store  atmospheric  CO

2

.  If  the  climate  continues  to 



warm, these typically frozen carbon sinks would begin to thaw. Eventually, the depth 

of  annual  thawing  of  frozen  soils  would  expose  large  quantities  of  carbon-rich 

organic  materials  in  the  permafrost  to  microbial  decomposition,  thereby  releasing 

vast quantities of methane into the atmosphere. 

 

Sea level rise 

 

Sea levels have risen and fallen due to natural causes many times over Earth's 

history.  However,  during  what  should  be  a  cooling  period,  warmer  ocean 


572 

temperatures  are  already  causing  ocean  water  to  expand  and  polarice  caps  to  melt. 

Forecasts as to the amount and timing of sea level rises are scientifically contentious, 

but  all  forecasts  predict  potentially  devastating  increases  over  the  next  decades  and 

centuries. In 2007, the IPCC predicted a rise between 18 and 59 centimeters (7 and 23 

inches)  by  2100.  However,  a  number  of  scientists  have  argued  in  leading  scientific 

journals  that  the  future  sea  level  rise  may  be  greater  than  the  IPCC's  2007  forecast 

and is unlikely to be less. 

In  2009,  new  data  on  glacial  melting  and  sea  level  rise  forced  scientists  to 

dramatically increase estimates of potential sea level rise and/or accelerate the rate of 

rise. The new data predict a sea level rise of at least 1 meter (a little more than 3 feet) 

by  2100.  Such  an  increase  in  sea  level  will  flood  coastal  regions,  where  about  one-

third  of  the  world's  population  lives  and  where  an  enormous  amount  of  economic 

infrastructure is concentrated. It would destroy coral reefs, accelerate coastal erosion, 

and  increase  the  salinity  of  coastal  groundwater  aquifers.  Some  low-lying  tropical 

Pacific  islands  are  already  losing  land  to  rising  seas,  and  on  some,  residents  are 

planning to leave as the sea engulfs their island homes. 

 

Changes in precipitation amounts and patterns 

 

As  globally  averaged  temperatures  rise,  scientists  predict  moderate  to  severe 

alterations in precipitation regimes in various parts of the world. According to some 

climate models, at the current rate of warming, precipitation patterns will change so 

that one-third of the planet will be considered desert by 2100. The percentage of the 

globe that is now prone to moderate drought will increase from 25 percent to nearly 

50 percent by century's end. The 8 percent of the land now prone to severe drought 

will increase to 40 percent of the land. 

In any region where the climate becomes drier, forested areas also are likely to 

shrink,  with  possible  expansion  of  savanna,  prairie,  or  even  desert.  A  landscape 

change  of  this  magnitude  is  believed  to  have  occurred  in  the  New  World  tropics 

during the Pleistocene glaciations. Due to the relatively dry climate at that time, what 

are  today  continuous  rainforests  may  have  been  constricted  into  relatively  small, 

isolated patches (refugia). These forest remnants may have existed within a landscape 

matrix of savanna and grassland. Such an enormous restructuring of the character of 

the  tropical  landscape  must  have  had  a  tremendous  effect  on  the  multitude  of  rare 

species  that  live  in  rainforests.  Further,  as  forests  shrink,  precipitation  decreases. 

Trees  transpire  enormous  quantities  of  water  vapor  into  the  air;  without  the  forests, 

entire regions experience dramatic declines in rainfall. 

Climate  change  will  also  likely  cause  important  changes  in  the  ability  of  the 

land  to  support  crops.  This  would  be  particularly  true  of lands  cultivated  in  regions 

that  are  marginal  in  terms  of  rainfall  and  are  vulnerable  to  drought  and 

desertification. For example, important crops such as wheat are grown in regions of 

the  western  interior  of  North  America  that  formerly  supported  natural  shortgrass 

prairie. It has been estimated that about 40 percent of this semiarid region, measuring 

400 million hectares (988 million acres), has already been desertified by agricultural 

activities and overgrazing, and crop-limiting droughts occur there sporadically. This 


573 

climatic  handicap  can  be  partially  managed  by  irrigation.  However,  there  is  a 

shortage  of  water  for  irrigation,  and  this  practice  can  cause  its  own  environmental 

problems,  such  as  salinization  of  the  soil.  Clearly,  substantial  changes  in  climate 

would place the present agricultural systems at great risk in many areas. 

Patterns  of  wildfire  would  also  be  influenced  by  changes  in  precipitation 

regimes. Based on climate  model predictions, it has been suggested that there could 

be  a  50  percent  increase  in  the  area  of  forest  annually  burned  in  Canada,  presently 

about 1-2 million hectares (2.5-4.9 million acres) in typical years. 

Shallow  marine  ecosystems  also  are  affected  by  increases  in  sea  surface 

temperature.  Corals  are  vulnerable  to  even  very  small  rises  in  water  temperature, 

which  deprives  them  of  their  symbiotic  algae  (called  zooxanthellae).  Depending  on 

the degree of warming, corals may be bleached or, if the warm-water regime is long 

lasting,  the  corals  may  die.  Widespread  coral  bleaching  is  increasingly  observed  as 

oceans  warm.  Coral  reefs  are  crucial  in  the  life  cycle  of  numerous  fish  species, 

including  fish  many  people  use  for  food.  The  demise  of  coral  reefs  as  sea  surface 

temperatures  warm  could  devastate  fisheries  worldwide.  A  potentially  more  severe 

problem  for  corals  arises  directly  from  increased  atmospheric  CO

2

,  which  increases 



the  acidity  of  the  oceans  as  it  dissolves.  Increased  acidity  diminishes  the  ability  of 

corals  and  many  other  sea  creatures  with  shells  to  make  their  hard  parts  of  calcium 

carbonate. 

 

Extreme weather 

 

Storms result from a complex number of factors, and it remains impossible to 



attribute any single storm to climate change. However, the long-range prediction of a 

number  of  climate  models  is  for  an  increased  frequency  and  severity  of  storms  as 

global  temperatures  rise.  In  August  2007,  scientists  at  the  World  Meteorological 

Organization, an agency of the United Nations, announced that during recent periods, 

several  regions  of  Earth  showed  significant  increases  above  long  term  global 

averages  in  both  high  temperatures  and  frequency  of  extreme  weather  events 

including heavy rainfalls, cyclones, and wind storms. 

A  decrease  in  the  temperature  difference  between  the  poles  and  the  equator 

would  alter  global  wind  patterns  and  storm  tracks.  Regions  with  marginal  rainfall 

levels  could  experience  drought,  making  them  uninhabitable.  Overall,  since  warmer 

air holds more moisture, an increase in global air and sea temperatures is expected to 

increase the number of storms. Many climate models predict that higher sea surface 

temperatures  would  increase  the  frequency  and  duration  of  hurricanes  and  El  Niño 

events. 


 

Species migration and biodiversity loss 

 

Studies of changes in vegetation during the warming climate that followed the 



most  recent  Pleistocene  glaciationsuggest  that  plant  species  responded  in  unique, 

individualistic ways. These differences result from the varying tolerances of species 

to  changes  in  climate  and  other  aspects  of  the  environment,  and  their  different 


574 

abilities to colonize newly available habitats. 

Some  models  predict  that  wild  plant  and  animal  species  would  need  to  move 

poleward  100  to  150  kilometers  (60  to  90  miles)  or  up  in  altitude  150  meters  (500 

feet) for each 1 degree Celsius rise in global temperature. As most species could not 

migrate that rapidly, and as development would stop them from colonizing many new 

areas, much biodiversity would be lost. 

Modern  drastic  climate  alterations  could  have  more  devastating  effects  on 

ecosystems,  and  the  plant  communities  at  their  base,  because  of  the  rapidity  with 

which  these  changes  are  occurring.  The  temperature  and  precipitation  changes  will 

likely have an enormous impact on vegetation, as soil moisture drops in many parts 

of  the  world.  It  is  reasonable  to  predict  that  any  large  changes  in  patterns  of 

precipitation  would  result  in  fundamental  reorganizations  of  vegetation  in  the 

terrestrial landscape. However, unlike previous naturally induced changes in climate, 

which usually occur over millennia, current climate changes may occur in a matter of 

decades. Such abrupt changes leave plants, and the animals that depend on them, too 

little time to adapt to the new conditions or to adapt enough to be able to survive in 

other biomes. 

Human  populations  also  are  predicted  to  shift  due  to  climate  change.  Some 

estimates suggest that the number of environmental refugees could rise to 150 million 

by 2050. 

 

Observable Climate Change Impacts 

 

 Studies  conducted  annually  since  2000  have  shown  yearly  decreases  in  both 



the  thickness  and  cover  of  Arctic  sea  ice.  A  study  released  in  2006  revealed  that 

perennial  sea  ice  in  the  Arctic,  normally  3  meters  (10  feet)  thick  or  greater,  has 

thinned  to  0.3-2  meters  (1-7  feet)  thick.  This  thinner  ice  is  far  more  vulnerable  to 

melting.  Perennial  ice  cover  also  is  declining  rapidly,  with  a  sharp  14  percent  loss 

between 2004  and  2005.  This  decrease  represents  an overall  loss  of 730,000  square 

kilometers  (280,000  square  miles).  Other  studies  conducted  in  2006  considered  the 

extent  of  summer,  or  non-perennial,  sea  ice  cover  in  the  Arctic,  which  has  been 

monitored  by  satellite  since  1979.  The  data  show  that  sea  ice  extent  reached  record 

lows in 2007 and 2012. The summer extent of sea ice was 39 percent lower in 2007 

than the 1978-2001 average. The Northwest Passage, which is the sea route from the 

Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean along the northern edge of North America, was 

ice-free  for  the  first  time  in  recorded  history.  Some  scientists  predict  that  large, 

navigable swaths of the Arctic Sea will be ice-free in summer by 2030. 

One of the most dramatic signs of global warming is the rapid melting of most 

of  the  world's  mountain  glaciers.  In  early  2008,  scientists  with  the  United  Nations 

Environment Programme announced that mountain glaciers were melting faster than 

ever as a result of global climate change. The rate of melting more than doubled from 

2004-2005  to  2005-2006  at  thirty  closely  monitored  reference  glaciers  around  the 

world.  The  melting  rate  for  2005-2006  was  four  times  greater  than  that  for  1980-

1999. Globally, not all glaciers thinned during 2005-2006, but the overall trend was 

strongly toward accelerated melting. 


575 

The year 2012 was the ninth warmest on record globally and the hottest year on 

record  in  the  United  States.  Despite  the  fact  that  part  of  the  decade  was  spent  at  a 

solar minimum, nine of the last thirteen years since 2000 have ranked in the top ten 

for hottest average temperatures. In addition to 1998, every year after 2001 appears at 

top of the warmest year record list. 

In  May  2013,  carbon  dioxide  monitoring  stations  at  the  Mauna  Loa 

Observatory  in  Hawaii  recorded  CO

2

  levels  of  400  parts  per  million  (ppm)  for  the 



first time.  Although  CO

2

  monitors  recorded  CO



2

 levels of  400  ppm  in  the  Arctic in 

2012, the May 2013 results at Mauna Loa marked the first recording of CO

2

 of 400 



ppm or higher in a temperate zone. 

 



1   ...   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал