Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет59/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   ...   70

 

 

 

512 

Heredity And Variability 

 

Evolution  is  the  process  by  which  organisms  change  over  time.  Mutations 

produce  genetic  variation  in  populations,  and  the  environment  interacts  with  this 

variation  to  select  those  individuals  best  adapted  to  their  surroundings.  The  best-

adapted  individuals  leave  behind  more  offspring  than  less  well-adapted  individuals 

do. Given enough time, one species may evolve into many others. 

The oldest verified sample of DNA has been pulled from soil deep within the 

permafrost of Siberia. The DNA belonged to grasses, sedges and shrubs estimated to 

be between 300,000 and 400,000 years old.  

The most ancient identified animal genetic material is about 50,000 years old. 

Although there is evidence of plants and animals dating back hundreds of millions of 

years, DNA from such specimens has not been identified because it has degraded. 

Paleomicrobiology  is  an  emerging  field  that  is  devoted  to  the  detection, 

identification  and  characterization  of  microorganisms  in  ancient  remains.  Data 

indicate that host-associated microbial DNA can survive for almost 20,000 years, and 

environmental  bacterial  DNA  preserved  in  permafrost  samples  has  been  dated  to 

400,000-600,000  years.  In  addition  to  frozen  and  mummified  soft  tissues,  bone  and 

dental pulp  can  also be used to  search  for  microbial pathogens.  Various  techniques, 

including  microscopy  and  immunodetection,  can  be  used  in  paleomicrobiology,  but 

most  data  have  been  obtained  using  PCR-based  molecular  techniques.  Infections 

caused  by  bacteria,  viruses  and  parasites  have  all  been  diagnosed  using 

paleomicrobiological techniques. Additionally, molecular typing of ancient pathogens 

could  help  to  reconstruct  the  epidemiology  of  past  epidemics  and  could  feed  into 

current  models of  emerging infections, therefore  contributing  to  the  development of 

appropriate preventative measures. 

 

Selection 

 

Selection in biology, the preferential survival and reproduction or preferential 

elimination of individuals with certain genotypes (genetic compositions), by means of 

natural or artificial controlling factors. 

The theory of evolution by natural selection was proposed by Charles Darwin 

and Alfred Russel Wallace in 1858. They argued that species with useful adaptations 

to  the  environment  are  more  likely  to  survive  and  produce  progeny  than  are  those 

with  less  useful  adaptations,  thereby  increasing  the  frequency  with  which  useful 

adaptations  occur  over  the  generations.  The  limited  resources  available  in  an 

environment  promotes  competition  in  which  organisms  of  the  same  or  different 

species struggle to survive. In the competition for food, space, and mates that occurs, 

the  less  well-adapted  individuals  must  die  or  fail  to  reproduce,  and  those  who  are 

better  adapted  do  survive  and  reproduce.  In  the  absence  of  competition  between 

organisms, selection may be due to purely environmental factors, such as inclement 

weather or seasonal variations. (See natural selection.) 

Artificial selection (or selective breeding) differs from natural selection in that 

heritable  variations  in  a  species  are  manipulated  by  humans  through  controlled 


513 

breeding.  The  breeder  attempts  to  isolate  and  propagate  those  genotypes  that  are 

responsible for a plant or animal’s desired qualities in a suitable environment. These 

qualities are economically or aesthetically desirable to humans, rather than useful to 

the organism in its natural environment. 

In  mass  selection,  a  number  of  individuals  chosen on the basis  of  appearance 

are mated; their progeny are further selected for the preferred characteristics, and the 

process is continued for as many generations as is desired. The choosing of breeding 

stock on the basis of ancestral reproductive ability and quality is known as pedigree 

selection.  Progeny  selection  indicates  choice  of  breeding  stock  on  the  basis  of  the 

performance  or  testing  of  their  offspring  or  descendants.  Family  selection  refers  to 

mating  of  organisms  from  the  same  ancestral  stock  that  are  not  directly  related  to 

each other. Pure-line selection involves selecting and breeding progeny from superior 

organisms  for  a  number  of  generations  until  a  pure  line  of  organisms  with  only  the 

desired characteristics has been established. 

Darwin also proposed a theory of sexual selection, in which females chose as 

mates the most attractive males; outstanding males thus helped generate more young 

than mediocre males. 



 

Evolutionary Development 

 

Evolutionary development (evolution of development or informally, evo-devo) 

is  a  field  of  biology  that  compares  the  developmental  processes  of  different 

organisms to determine the ancestral relationship between them, and to discover how 

developmental processes evolved. It addresses the origin and evolution of embryonic 

development;  how  modifications  of  development  and  developmental  processes  lead 

to  the  production  of  novel  features,  such  as  the  evolution  of  feathers  the  role  of 

developmental  plasticity  in  evolution;  how  ecology  impacts  development  and 

evolutionary change; and the developmental basis of homoplasy and homology.

[3]


 

Although interest in the relationship between ontogeny and phylogeny extends 

back  to  the  nineteenth  century,  the  contemporary  field  of  evo-devo  has  gained 

impetus  from  the  discovery  of  genes  regulating  embryonic  development  in  model. 

General  hypotheses  remain  hard  to  test  because  organisms  differ  so  much  in  shape 

and form. 

Nevertheless,  it  now  appears  that  just  as  evolution  tends  to  create  new  genes 

from parts of old genes (molecular economy), evo-devo demonstrates that evolution 

alters developmental processes to create new and novel structures from the old gene 

networks  (such  as bone structures of the  jaw  deviating to the  ossicles  of  the  middle 

ear) or will conserve (molecular economy) a similar program in a host of organisms 

such  as  eye  development  genes  in  mollusks,  insects,  and  vertebrates.  Initially  the 

major  interest  has  been  in  the  evidence  of  homology  in  the  cellular  and  molecular 

mechanisms  that  regulate  body  plan  and  organ  development.  However,  subsequent 

approaches include developmental changes associated with speciation. 

 

 

 


514 

Organismes And Environment 

State Of Ecosystems, Habitats And Species 

 

In the past, human  interaction  with nature,  although  often having  a disruptive 

effect on nature, often also enriched the quality and variety of the living world and its 

habitats - e.g. through the creation of artificial landscapes and soil cultivation by local 

farmers. 

Today,  however,  human  pressure  on  natural  environments  is  greater  than 

before  in  terms  of  magnitude  and  efficiency  in  disrupting  nature  and  natural 

landscapes, most notably: 

-  Intensive  agriculture  replacing  traditional  farming;  this  combined  with  the 

subsidies  of  industrial  farming  has  had  an  enormous  effect  on  western  rural 

landscapes and continues to be a threat. 

- Mass tourism affecting mountains and coasts. 

-  the  policies  pursued  in  the  industry,  transport  and  energy  sectors  having  a 

direct  and  damaging  impact  on  the  coasts,  major  rivers  (dam  construction  and 

associated canal building) and mountain landscapes (main road networks). 

-  The  strong  focus  of  forestry  management  on  economic  targets  primarily 

causes the decline in biodiversity, soil erosion and other related effects. 

 

Human Impact On The Natural Environment 

 

Human  impact  on  the  environment  or  anthropogenic  impact  on  the 

environment  includes  impacts  on  biophysical  environments,  biodiversity,  and  other 

resources.  The  term  anthropogenic  designates  an  effect  or  object  resulting  from 

human  activity.  The  term  was  first  used in  the technical sense  by  Russian  geologist 

Alexey Pavlov, and was first used in English by British ecologist Arthur Tansley in 

reference  to  human  influences  on  climax  plant  communities.  The  atmospheric 

scientist  Paul  Crutzen  introduced  the  term  "AAnthropocene"  in  the  mid-1970s.  The 

term  is sometimes  used in  the  context of pollution  emissions that  are  produced  as a 

result  of  human  activities  but  applies  broadly  to  all  major  human  impacts  on  the 

environment.

 

Technology 



The  applications  of  technology  often  result  in  unavoidable  environmental 

impacts,  which  according  to  the  I  =  PAT  equation  is  measured  as  resource  use  or 

pollution generated  per  unit  GDP.  Environmental impacts  caused  by  the  application 

of technology are often perceived as unavoidable for several reasons. First, given that 

the purpose of many technologies is to exploit, control, or otherwise “improve” upon 

nature  for  the  perceived  benefit  of  humanity  while  at  the  same  time  the  myriad  of 

processes  in  nature  have  been  optimized  and  are  continually  adjusted  by  evolution, 

any disturbance of these natural processes by technology is likely to result in negative 

environmental consequences. Second, the conservation of mass principle and the first 

law of thermodynamics (i.e., conservation of energy) dictate that whenever material 

resources or energy are moved around or manipulated by technology, environmental 

consequences  are  inescapable.  Third,  according  to  the  second  law  of 



515 

thermodynamics,  order  can  be  increased  within  a  system  (such  as  the  human 

economy)  only  by  increasing  disorder  or  entropy  outside  the  system  (i.e.,  the 

environment).  Thus,  technologies  can  create  “order”  in  the  human  economy  (i.e., 

order  as  manifested  in  buildings,  factories,  transportation  networks,  communication 

systems,  etc.)  only  at  the  expense  of  increasing  “disorder”  in  the  environment. 

According  to  a  number  of  studies,  increased  entropy  is  likely  to  be  correlated  to 

negative environmental impacts.  



 

Applied integrated sciences 

Biochemistry and molecular biology (mcdb) 

 

A  common  concern  for  the  life  and  composition  of  the  cell  brings  biologists 

and  chemists  together  in  the  field  of  biochemistry-molecular  biology.  The  vast  and 

complex  array  of  chemical  reactions  occurring  in  living  matter  and  the  chemical 

composition  of  the  cell  are  the  primary  concerns  of  the  biochemist.  Life  processes 

occurring  at  the  molecular  level,  including  the  storage  and  transfer  of  genetic 

information  and  the  interactions  between  cells  and  the  viruses  that  infect  them,  are 

the investigatory concerns of the molecular biologist. 

The Major 

Biochemistry and molecular biology are sub-disciplines within the larger, more 

general area of biological sciences. The study of biochemistry and molecular biology 

requires that students be genuinely interested and able to perform successfully in the 

"quantitative"  sciences  and  that  they  have  acquired  a  solid  foundation  in  biology, 

chemistry,  mathematics,  and  physics  in  their  high  school  or  community  college 

careers. 

Students  planning  to  major  in  biochemistry-molecular  biology  enter  as  a 

biological  sciences  premajor  and  take  a  common  core  curriculum  consisting  of 

introductory  biology,  general  chemistry,  physics,  organic  chemistry,  a  full  year  of 

calculus  and  an  additional  mathematics  course,  preferably  differential  equations. 

Students  should  complete  this  preparatory  work  in  their  freshman  and  sophomore 

years.  Following  successful  completion  of  seven  of  these  courses,  students  may 

advance  from  biology  premajor  to  full  major  status.  The  Biochemistry-Molecular 

Biology  major  requires  completion  of  48  upper-division  quarter  units,  including 

coursework in biochemistry, physical chemistry, general and molecular genetics, plus 

electives.  Students  should  review  the  full  requirement  sheet  for  the  major  and  plan 

their schedules accordingly. 

Throughout  the Biochemistry-Molecular Biology  program,  students  encounter 

and  work  with  the  sophisticated  techniques  and  equipment  that  allow  them  to 

penetrate what one scientist refers to as "the boundaries between what we know and 

what we do not know, between our current understanding and what we are seeking to 

understand."  At  UCSB,  students  learn  not  only  in  the  classroom,  but  also  in  the 

laboratory. There they actively engage in research with faculty and routinely interact 

with  graduate  students  and  postdoctoral  research  fellows.  A  continuing  series  of 

seminars  conducted  by  outside  researchers,  as  well  as  seminars  on  advanced  topics 

conducted by department faculty, supplement the curriculum. 


516 

Cell Biology 

 

Cell biology (formerly called cytology, from the Greek 

κυτος, kytos, "vessel") 

and  otherwise  known  as  molecular  biology,  is  a  branch  of  biology  that  studies  the 

different structures and functions of the cell and focuses mainly on the idea of the cell 

as  the  basic  unit  of  life.  Cell  biology  explains  the  structure,  organization  of  the 

organelles they contain, their physiological properties, metabolic processes, signaling 

pathways, life cycle, and interactions with their environment. This is done both on a 

microscopic and molecular level as it encompasses prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic. 

Knowing the components of cells and how cells work is fundamental to all biological 

sciences it is also essential for research in bio-medical fields such as cancer, and other 

diseases.  Research  in  cell  biology  is  closely  related  to  genetics,  biochemistry, 

molecular  biology,  immunology,  and  developmental  biology.  Chemical  and 

Molecular Environment  

The  study  of  the  cell  is  done  on  a  molecular  level;  however,  most  of  the 

processes  within  the  cell  is  made  up  of  a  mixture  of  small  organic  molecules, 

inorganic ions, hormones, and water. Approximately 75-85% of the cell’s volume is 

due  to  water  making  it  an  indispensable  solvent  as  a  result  of  its  polarity  and 

structure.

[1]


  These  molecules  within  the  cell,  which  operate  as  substrates,  provide  a 

suitable environment for the cell to carry out metabolic reactions and signaling. The 

cell shape varies among the different types of organisms, and are thus then classified 

into  two  categories:  eukaryotes  and  prokaryotes.  In  the  case  of  eukaryotic  cells  - 

which  are  made  up  of  animal,  plant,  fungi,  and  protozoa  cells  -  the  shapes  are 

generally  round  and  spherical,  while  for  prokaryotic  cells  –  which  are  composed  of 

bacteria  and  archaea  -  the  shapes  are:  spherical  (cocci),  rods  (bacillus),  curved 

(vibrio), and spirals (spirochetes).  

Cell biology focuses more on the study of eukaryotic cells, and their signaling 

pathways,  rather  than  on  prokaryotes,  which  is  covered  under  microbiology.  The 

main constituents of the general molecular composition of the cell includes: proteins 

and  lipids  which  are  either  free  flowing  or  membrane  bound,  along  with  different 

internal compartments known as organelles. This environment of the cell is made up 

of hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions, which allows for the exchange of the above-

mentioned molecules and ions. The hydrophilic regions of the cell are mainly on the 

inside  and  outside  of  the  cell,  while  the  hydrophobic  regions  are  within  the 

phospholipid bilayer of the cell membrane. The cell membrane consists of lipids and 

proteins  which  accounts  for  its  hydrophobicity  as  a  result  of  being  non-polar 

substances. Therefore, in order for these molecules to participate in reactions, within 

the cell, they need to be able to cross this membrane layer to get into the cell. They 

accomplish this process of gaining access to the cell via: osmotic pressure, diffusion, 

concentration  gradients,  and  membrane  channels.  Inside  of  the  cell  are  extensive 

internal sub-cellular membrane-bounded compartments called organelles. 

 

Biotechnology 

 

Biological techniques used to enhance products 



517 

Biotechnology (sometimes shortened to "biotech") is a field of applied biology 

that  involves  the  use  of  living  organisms  to  enhance  crops,  biofuels,  household 

products,  and  medical  treatments.  Modern  biotechnology  may  involve  the  use  of 

genetic  engineering  technology  to  permanently  alter  the  genetic  makeup  of  living 

organisms. 

Biotechnology is the use of living systems and organisms to develop or make 

products,  or  "any  technological  application  that  uses  biological  systems,  living 

organisms  or  derivatives  thereof,  to  make  or  modify  products  or  processes  for 

specific  use"  (UN  Convention  on  Biological  Diversity,  Art.  2).  Depending  on  the 

tools  and  applications,  it  often  overlaps  with  the  (related)  fields  of  bioengineering, 

biomedical engineering, bio manufacturing, etc. 

For thousands of years, humankind has used biotechnology in agriculture, food 

production, and medicine.

[2]

 The term is largely believed to have been coined in 1919 



by  Hungarian  engineer  Károly  Ereky.  In  the  late  20th  and  early  21st  century, 

biotechnology  has  expanded to include new  and diverse sciences such  as genomics, 

recombinant  gene  techniques,  applied  immunology,  and  development  of 

pharmaceutical therapies and diagnostic tests.

[2]

 

 



Biophysics 

 

Some  of  the  earlier  studies  in  biophysics  were  conducted  in  the  1840s  by  a 

group  known  as  the  Berlin  school  of  physiologists.  Among  its  members  were 

pioneers such as Hermann von Helmholtz, Ernst Heinrich Weber, Carl F. W. Ludwig, 

and  Johannes  Peter  Muller.  Biophysics  might  even  be  seen  as  dating  back  to  the 

studies of Luigi Galvani. 

The  popularity  of  the  field  rose  when  the  book  What  Is  Life?  by  Erwin 

Schrödinger was published. Since 1957 biophysicists have organized themselves into 

the Biophysical Society which now has about 9,000 members over the world.  

What do biophysicists study? 

Biophysicists  study  life  at  every  level,  from  atoms  and  molecules  to  cells, 

organisms, and environments. As innovations come out of physics and biology labs, 

biophysicists  find  new  areas  to  explore  where  they  can  apply  their  expertise,  create 

new  tools,  and  learn  new  things.  The  work  always  aims  to  find  out  how  biological 

systems work. Biophysicists ask questions, such as: 

How  do  protein  machines  work?  Even  though  they  are  millions  of  times 

smaller  than  everyday  machines,  molecular  machines  work  on  the  same  principles. 

They use energy to do work. The kinesin machine shown here is carrying a load as it 

walks along a track. Biophysics reveals how each step is powered forward. 

 

 



Reading 

Diversity, structure and function of living organisms. 

Diversity in living organisms 

 

 In  biology,  an  organism  is  any  contiguous  living  system,  such  as  an  animal, 



518 

plant,  fungus,  archaeon, or bacterium.  All  known  types  of  organisms  are  capable  of 

some  degree  of  response  to  stimuli,  reproduction,  growth  and  development  and 

homeostasis.  An  organism  consists  of  one  or  more  cells;  when  it  has  one  cell  it  is 

known  as  a  unicellular  organism;  and  when  it  has  more  than  one  it  is  known  as 

amulticellular organism. Most unicellular organisms are of microscopic size and are 

thus classified as microorganisms. Humans are multicellular organisms composed of 

many trillions of cells grouped into specialized tissues and organs. 

An  organism  may  be  either  a  prokaryote  or  a  eukaryote.  Prokaryotes  are 

represented by two separate domains, the Bacteria andArchaea. Eukaryotic organisms 

are  characterized  by  the  presence  of  a  membrane-bound  cell  nucleus  and  contain 

additional membrane-bound compartments called organelles (such as mitochondria in 

animals  and  plants  and  plastids  in  plants  and  algae,  all  generally  considered  to  be 

derived from endosymbiotic bacteria).[1] Fungi, animals and plants are examples of 

kingdoms of organisms within the eukaryotes. 

Estimates on the number of Earth’s current species range from 10 million to 14 

million,[2]  of  which  only  about  1.2  million  have  been  documented.[3]  More  than 

99% of all species, amounting to over five billion species,[4] that ever lived on Earth 

are estimated to beextinct.[5][6] In July 2016, scientists reported identifying a set of 

355  genes  from  the  Last  Universal  Common  Ancestor  (LUCA)  of  all  organisms 

living on Earth.[7][8] 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Genus–differentia definition (Photo credit: Wikipedia) 

 Diversity in Living Organisms  

1) Every living organism is unique and this uniqueness is the basis of the vast 

diversity displayed by the organisms in our world. 

2)  This  huge  diversity  is  the  result  of  evolution,  which  has  occurred  over 

millions of years.  

3)  The  massive  biological  diversity  can  only  be  studied  by  classification  i.e. 

arranging organisms into groups based on their similarities and differences. 

4) Different characteristics are used to determine thehierarchy of classification. 

5)  The  primary  characteristics  that  determine  the  broadest  divisions  in 

classification  are  independent  of  any  other  characteristics.  The  secondary 

characteristics depend on the primary ones. 



519 

6)  Prokaryotic  or  eukaryotic  cell  organization  is  the  primary  characteristic  of 

classification, since this feature influences every detail of cell design and capacity to 

undertake specialized functions. 

7) Being a unicellular or multicellular organism formsthe next basic feature of 

classification and causes huge differences in the body design of organisms. 

8)  The  next  level  of  classification  depends  on  whether  the  organism  is 

autotrophic  or  heterotrophic.  Further  classification  depends  on  the  various  levels  of 

organization of the bodies of these organisms. 

9) The evolution of organisms greatly determines theirclassification. 

10)  The  organisms  who  evolved  much  earlier  have  simple  and  ancient  body 

designs whereas the recently evolved younger organisms have complexbody designs. 

11)  Older  organisms  are  also  referred  to  as  primitive  or  lower  organisms 

whereas the younger organisms are also referred to as advanced or higher organisms. 

12) The diversity of life forms found in a region is biodiversity. 

13)  The  region  of  mega-diversity  is  found  in  the  warm  and  humid  tropical 

regions of the Earth. 

14) Aristotle classified organisms depending on their habitat. 

15)  Robert  Whittaker  proposed  the  five-kingdom  scheme  of  classification, 

based on the cell structure, nutrition and body organization of the organisms. 

16)  The  main  characteristics  considered  in  the  five-kingdom  scheme  of 

classification are: 

i) Presence of prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells. 

ii) If eukaryote, whether the organism is unicellular or multicellular.  

 

“Monophyletic tree of organisms”. Ernst Haeckel: Generelle Morphologie der 

Organismen, etc. Berlin, 1866. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) 

 


520 


1   ...   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал