Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет57/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   70

 

Lipids 

 

Main articles: Lipid, Glycerol, and Fatty acid 



495 

 

Structures  of  some  common  lipids.  At  the  top  are  cholesterol  and  oleic 



acid.

[37]


The  middle  structure  is  a  triglyceride  composed  of  oleoyl,  stearoyl,  and 

palmitoylchains  attached  to  a  glycerol  backbone.  At  the  bottom  is  the 

commonphospholipid, phosphatidylcholine.

[38]


 

Lipids comprises a diverse range of molecules and to some extent is a catchall 

for relatively water-insoluble or nonpolar compounds of biological origin, including 

waxes,  fatty  acids,  fatty-acid derived phospho lipids, sphingolipids,  glycolipids,  and 

terpenoids  (e.g.,  retinoids  and  steroids).  Some  lipids  are  linear  aliphatic  molecules, 

while others have ring structures. Some are aromatic, while others are not. Some are 

flexible, while others are rigid.

[39]

 

Lipids  are  usually  made  from  one  molecule  of  glycerol  combined  with  other 



molecules.  Intriglycerides,  the  main  group  of  bulk  lipids,  there  is  one  molecule  of 

glycerol  and  three  fatty  acids.  Fatty  acids  are  considered  the  monomer  in  that  case, 

and  may  be  saturated  (no  double  bonds  in  the  carbon  chain)  or  unsaturated  (one  or 

more double bonds in the carbon chain).

[40]

 

Most lipids have some polar character in addition to being largely nonpolar. In 



general,  the  bulk  of  their  structure  is  nonpolar  or  hydrophobic  ("water-fearing"), 

meaning that it does not interact well with polar solvents like water. Another part of 

their structure is polar or hydrophilic ("water-loving") and will tend to associate with 

polar  solvents  like  water.  This  makes  them  amphiphilic  molecules  (having  both 

hydrophobic and hydrophilic portions). In the case of cholesterol, the polar group is a 

mere  -OH  (hydroxyl  or  alcohol).  In  the  case  of  phospholipids,  the  polar  groups  are 

considerably larger and more polar, as described below.

[41]


 

Lipids are an integral part of our daily diet. Most oils and milk products that we 



496 

use  for  cooking  and  eating  like  butter,  cheese,  ghee  etc.,  are  composed  of  fats. 

Vegetable  oils  are  rich  in  variouspolyunsaturated  fatty  acids  (PUFA).  Lipid-

containing  foods  undergo  digestion  within  the  body  and  are  broken  into  fatty  acids 

and  glycerol,  which  are  the  final  degradation  products  of  fats  and  lipids.  Lipids, 

especially phospholipids, are also used in various pharmaceutical products, either as 

co-solubilisers (e.g., in parenteral infusions) or else as drug carrier components (e.g., 

in a liposome ortransfersome). 



 

Proteins 

 

Main articles: Protein and Amino acid 

 

The general structure of an 



α-amino acid, with theamino group on the left and 

the carboxyl group on the right. 

 

Generic amino acids (1) in neutral form, (2) as they exist physiologically, and 



(3) joined together as a dipeptide. 

Proteins  are  very  large  molecules  –  macro-biopolymers  –  made  from 

monomers called amino acids. An amino acid consists of a carbon atom bound to four 

groups. One is an amino group, —NH

2

, and one is a carboxylic acid group, —COOH 



(although these exist as —NH

3

+



 and —COO

under physiologic conditions). The third 



is  a simple hydrogen  atom.  The  fourth  is  commonly  denoted "—R"  and is different 

for each amino acid. There are 20 standard amino acids, each containing a carboxyl 

group, an amino group, and a side-chain (known as an "R" group). The "R" group is 

what  makes  each  amino  acid  different,  and  the  properties  of  the  side-chains  greatly 

influence the overall three-dimensional conformation of a protein. Some amino acids 

have functions by themselves or in a modified form; for instance, glutamate functions 

as  an  important  neurotransmitter.  Amino  acids  can  be  joined  via  a  peptide  bond.  In 

this  dehydration  synthesis,  a  water  molecule  is  removed  and  the  peptide  bond 

connects  the  nitrogen  of  one  amino  acid's  amino  group  to  the  carbon  of  the  other's 

carboxylic  acid  group.  The  resulting  molecule  is  called  a  dipeptide,  and  short 

stretches  of  amino  acids  (usually,  fewer  than  thirty)  are  called  peptides  or 

polypeptides. Longer stretches merit the title proteins. As an example, the important 

blood serum protein albumin contains 585 amino acid residues.

[42]


 

497 

 

A  schematic  ofhemoglobin.  The  red  and  blue  ribbons  represent  the  protein 



globin; the green structures are the hemegroups. 

Some proteins perform largely structural roles. For instance, movements of the 

proteins  actin  and  myosinultimately  are  responsible  for  the  contraction  of  skeletal 

muscle.  One  property  many  proteins  have  is  that  they  specifically  bind  to  a  certain 

molecule  or  class  of  molecules—they  may  be  extremely  selective  in  what  they 

bind.Antibodies  are  an  example  of  proteins  that  attach  to  one  specific  type  of 

molecule.  In  fact,  the  enzyme-linked  immunosorbent  assay  (ELISA),  which  uses 

antibodies, is one of the most sensitive tests modern medicine uses to detect various 

biomolecules.  Probably  the  most  important  proteins,  however,  are  the  enzymes. 

Virtually  every  reaction  in  a  living  cell  requires  an  enzyme  to  lower  the  activation 

energy of the reaction. These molecules recognize specific reactant molecules called 

substrates; they then catalyze the reaction between them. By lowering the activation 

energy, the enzyme speeds up that reaction by a rate of 10

11

 or more; a reaction that 



would normally take over 3,000 years to complete spontaneously might take less than 

a second with an enzyme. The enzyme itself is not used up in the process, and is free 

to catalyze  the same  reaction  with a  new set  of  substrates.  Using  various  modifiers, 

the activity of the enzyme can be regulated, enabling control of the biochemistry of 

the cell as a whole. 

The structure of proteins is traditionally described in a hierarchy of four levels. 

The  primary  structure  of  a  protein  simply  consists  of  its  linear  sequence  of  amino 

acids; for instance, "alanine-glycine-tryptophan-serine-glutamate-asparagine-glycine-

lysine-…".  Secondary  structure  is  concerned  with  local  morphology  (morphology 

being the study of structure). Some combinations of amino acids will tend to curl up 

in a coil called an

α-helix or into a sheet called a β-sheet; some α-helixes can be seen 

in the hemoglobin schematic above. Tertiary structure is the entire three-dimensional 

shape  of  the  protein.  This  shape  is  determined  by  the  sequence  of  amino  acids.  In 

fact, a single change can change the entire structure. The alpha chain of hemoglobin 

contains 146 amino acid residues; substitution of the glutamate residue at position 6 

with  a valine  residue  changes  the  behavior  of  hemoglobin so much  that it  results  in 

sickle-cell  disease.  Finally,  quaternary  structure  is  concerned  with  the structure of  a 

protein with multiple peptide subunits, like hemoglobin with its four subunits. Not all 

proteins have more than one subunit.

[43]

 


498 

 

Examples of protein structures from the Protein Data Bank 



 

 

Members of a protein family, as represented by the structures of the isomerase 



domains. 

Ingested proteins are usually broken up into single amino acids or dipeptides in 

the small intestine, and then absorbed. They can then be joined to make new proteins. 

Intermediate products of glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and the pentose phosphate 

pathway  can  be  used  to  make  all  twenty  amino  acids,  and  most  bacteria  and  plants 

possess all the necessary enzymes to synthesize them. Humans and other mammals, 

however,  can  synthesize  only  half  of  them.  They  cannot  synthesize  isoleucine, 

leucine,  lysine,  methionine,  phenylalanine,  threonine,  tryptophan,  and  valine.  These 

are the essential amino acids, since it is essential to ingest them. Mammals do possess 

the  enzymes  to  synthesize  alanine,  asparagine,  aspartate,  cysteine,  glutamate, 

glutamine, glycine, proline, serine, andtyrosine, the nonessential amino acids. While 

they  can  synthesize  arginine  and  histidine,  they  cannot  produce  it  in  sufficient 

amounts  for  young,  growing  animals,  and  so  these  are  often  considered  essential 

amino acids. 



499 

If  the amino group is  removed from  an  amino  acid, it  leaves behind  a carbon 

skeleton called an 

α-keto acid. Enzymes called transaminases can easily transfer the 

amino group from one amino acid (making it an 

α-keto acid) to another α-keto acid 

(making it an amino acid). This is important in the biosynthesis of amino acids, as for 

many of the pathways, intermediates from other biochemical pathways are converted 

to  the 

α-keto  acid  skeleton,  and  then  an  amino  group  is  added,  often  via 

transamination. The amino acids may then be linked together to make a protein.

[44]


 

A similar process is used to break down proteins. It is first hydrolyzed into its 

component amino acids. Free ammonia(NH

3

), existing as the ammonium ion (NH



4

+



in blood, is toxic to life forms. A suitable method for excreting it must therefore exist. 

Different tactics have evolved in different animals, depending on the animals' needs. 

Unicellularorganisms,  of  course,  simply  release  the  ammonia  into  the  environment. 

Likewise,  bony  fish  can  release  the  ammonia  into  the  water  where  it  is  quickly 

diluted. In general, mammals convert the ammonia into urea, via the urea cycle.

[45]


 

In  order  to  determine  whether  two  proteins  are  related,  or  in  other  words  to 

decide  whether  they  are  homologous  or  not,  scientists  use  sequence-comparison 

methods.  Methods  like  sequence  alignments  and  structural  alignments  are  powerful 

tools  that  help  scientists  identify  homologies  between  related  molecules.

[46]


  The 

relevance  of  finding  homologies  among  proteins  goes  beyond  forming  an 

evolutionary  pattern  of  protein  families.  By  finding  how  similar  two  protein 

sequences  are,  we  acquire  knowledge  about  their  structure  and  therefore  their 

function. 

 

Nucleic acids 

 

Main articles: Nucleic acid, DNA, RNA, and Nucleotides 

 

 

The  structure  of  deoxyribonucleic  acid  (DNA),  the  picture  shows  the 



monomers being put together. 

Nucleic  acids,  so  called  because  of  its  prevalence  in  cellular  nuclei,  is  the 

generic  name  of  the  family  of  biopolymers.  They  are  complex,  high-molecular-

weight biochemical macromolecules that can convey genetic information in all living 

cells and viruses.

[2]


 The monomers are called nucleotides, and each consists of three 

components:  a  nitrogenous  heterocyclic  base  (either  a  purine  or  a  pyrimidine),  a 

pentose sugar, and a phosphate group.

[47]


 

500 

 

Structural elements of common nucleic acid constituents. Because they contain 



at  least  one  phosphate  group,  the  compounds  marked  nucleoside  monophosphate

nucleoside  diphosphate  and  nucleoside  triphosphate  are  all  nucleotides  (not  simply 

phosphate-lackingnucleosides). 

The  most  common  nucleic  acids  are  deoxyribonucleic  acid  (DNA)  and 

ribonucleic  acid  (RNA).

[48]

  The  phosphate  group  and  the  sugar  of  each  nucleotide 



bond with each other to form the backbone of the nucleic acid, while the sequence of 

nitrogenous  bases  stores  the  information.  The  most  common  nitrogenous  bases  are 

adenine, cytosine,guanine, thymine, and uracil. The nitrogenous bases of each strand 

of a nucleic acid will form hydrogen bonds with certain other nitrogenous bases in a 

complementary  strand  of  nucleic  acid  (similar  to  a  zipper).  Adenine  binds  with 

thymine and uracil; Thymine binds only with adenine; and cytosine and guanine can 

bind only with one another. 

Aside  from  the  genetic  material  of  the  cell,  nucleic  acids  often  play  a  role  as 

second messengers, as well as forming the base molecule for adenosine triphosphate 

(ATP),  the  primary  energy-carrier  molecule  found  in  all  living  organisms.

[49]

  Also, 


the  nitrogenous  bases  possible  in  the  two  nucleic  acids  are  different:  adenine, 

cytosine,  and  guanine  occur  in  both  RNA  and  DNA,  while  thymine  occurs  only  in 

DNA and uracil occurs in RNA. 

Metabolism[edit] 



 

Carbohydrates as energy source 

 

Main article: Carbohydrate metabolism 

Glucose  is  the  major  energy  source  in  most  life  forms.  For  instance, 

polysaccharides  are  broken  down  into  their  monomers  (glycogen  phosphorylase 

removes  glucose  residues  from  glycogen).  Disaccharides  like  lactose  or  sucrose  are 

cleaved into their two component monosaccharides. 



Glycolysis (anaerobic)[edit] 

501 

 

Glucose 



G6P 

F6P 


F1,6BP 

GADP 


DHAP 

1,3BPG 


3PG 

2PG 


PEP 

Pyruvate 

HK 

PGI 


PFK 

ALDO 


TPI 

GAPDH 


PGK 

PGM 


ENO 

PK 


 

The  metabolic  pathway  of  glycolysis  converts  glucose  to  pyruvate  by  via  a 

series  of  intermediate  metabolites.  Each  chemical  modification  (red  box)  is 

performed by a different enzyme. Steps 1 and 3 consume ATP (blue) and steps 7 and 

10  produce  ATP  (yellow).  Since  steps  6-10  occur  twice  per  glucose  molecule,  this 

leads to a net production of ATP. 

Glucose  is  mainly  metabolized  by  a  very  important  ten-step  pathway 

calledglycolysis,  the  net  result  of  which  is  to  break  down  one  molecule  of  glucose 

into two molecules of pyruvate. This also produces a net two molecules ofATP, the 

energy  currency  of  cells,  along  with  two  reducing  equivalents  of  converting  NAD

+

 

(nicotinamide  adenine  dinucleotide:oxidised  form)  to  NADH  (nicotinamide  adenine 



502 

dinucleotide:reduced form).  This does not  require oxygen;  if no oxygen  is available 

(or  the  cell  cannot  use  oxygen),  the  NAD  is  restored  by  converting  the  pyruvate  to 

lactate (lactic acid) (e.g., in humans) or to ethanol plus carbon dioxide (e.g., in yeast). 

Other  monosaccharides  like  galactose  and  fructose  can  be  converted  into 

intermediates of the glycolytic pathway.

[50]

 

Aerobic[edit] 



In aerobic cells with sufficient oxygen, as in most human cells, the pyruvate is 

further metabolized. It is irreversibly converted to acetyl-CoA, giving off one carbon 

atom as the waste product carbon dioxide, generating another reducing equivalent as 

NADH. The two molecules acetyl-CoA (from one molecule of glucose) then enter the 

citric acid cycle, producing two more molecules of ATP, six more NADH molecules 

and  two  reduced  (ubi)quinones  (via  FADH

2

  as  enzyme-bound  cofactor),  and 



releasing  the  remaining  carbon  atoms  as  carbon  dioxide.  The  produced  NADH  and 

quinol  molecules  then  feed  into  the  enzyme  complexes  of  the  respiratory  chain,  an 

electron  transport  system  transferring  the  electrons  ultimately  to  oxygen  and 

conserving  the  released  energy  in  the  form  of  a  proton  gradient  over  a  membrane 

(inner mitochondrial membrane in eukaryotes). Thus, oxygen is reduced to water and 

the  original  electron  acceptors  NAD

+

  and  quinone  are  regenerated.  This  is  why 



humans breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide. The energy released from 

transferring the electrons from high-energy states in NADH and quinol is conserved 

first  as  proton  gradient  and  converted  to  ATP  via  ATP  synthase.  This  generates  an 

additional  28  molecules  of  ATP  (24  from  the  8  NADH  +  4  from  the  2  quinols), 

totaling  to  32  molecules  of  ATP  conserved  per  degraded  glucose  (two  from 

glycolysis + two from the citrate cycle).

[51]

 It is clear that using oxygen to completely 



oxidize  glucose  provides  an  organism  with  far  more  energy  than  any  oxygen-

independent metabolic feature, and this is thought to be the reason why complex life 

appeared only after Earth's atmosphere accumulated large amounts of oxygen. 

Gluconeogenesis[edit] 

Main article: Gluconeogenesis 

In vertebrates, vigorously contracting skeletal muscles (during weightlifting or 

sprinting,  for  example)  do  not  receive  enough  oxygen  to  meet  the  energy  demand, 

and  so  they  shift  to  anaerobic  metabolism,  converting  glucose  to  lactate.  The  liver 

regenerates the glucose,  using  a process called gluconeogenesis.  This process is  not 

quite  the  opposite  of  glycolysis,  and  actually  requires  three  times  the  amount  of 

energy gained from glycolysis (six molecules of ATP are used, compared to the two 

gained  in  glycolysis).  Analogous  to  the  above  reactions,  the  glucose  produced  can 

then undergo glycolysis in tissues that need energy, be stored as glycogen (or starch 

in  plants),  or  be  converted  to  other  monosaccharides  or  joined  into  di-  or 

oligosaccharides.  The  combined  pathways  of  glycolysis  during  exercise,  lactate's 

crossing via the bloodstream to the liver, subsequent gluconeogenesis and release of 

glucose into the bloodstream is called the Cori cycle.

[52]


 

Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences[edit] 



503 

 

Schematic relationship between biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology 

Researchers in biochemistry use specific techniques native to biochemistry, but 

increasingly  combine  these  with  techniques  and  ideas  developed  in  the  fields  of 

genetics, molecular biology and biophysics. There has never been a hard-line among 

these  disciplines  in  terms  of  content  and  technique.  Today,  the  terms  molecular 



biology  and  biochemistry  are  nearly  interchangeable.  The  following  figure  is  a 

schematic that depicts one possible view of the relationship between the fields: 

-  Biochemistry  is  the  study  of  the  chemical  substances  and  vital  processes 

occurring  in  living  organisms.  Biochemists  focus  heavily  on  the  role,  function,  and 

structure of biomolecules. The study of the chemistry behind biological processes and 

the synthesis of biologically active molecules are examples of biochemistry. 

Genetics is the study of the effect of genetic differences on organisms. Often 

this can be inferred by the absence of a normal component (e.g., one gene). The study 

of  "mutants"  –  organisms  with  a  changed  gene  that  leads  to  the  organism  being 

different  with  respect  to  the  so-called  "wild  type"  or  normal  phenotype.  Genetic 

interactions (epistasis) can often confound simple interpretations of such "knock-out" 

or "knock-in" studies. 

Molecular biology is the study of molecular underpinnings of the process of 

replication, transcription and translation of the genetic material. The central dogma of 

molecular biology where genetic material is transcribed into RNA and then translated 

into  protein,  despite  being  an  oversimplified  picture  of  molecular  biology,  still 

provides  a  good  starting  point  for  understanding  the  field.  This  picture,  however,  is 

undergoing revision in light of emerging novel roles for RNA.

[53]

 

Chemical biology seeks to develop new tools based on small molecules that 



allow  minimal  perturbation  of  biological  systems  while  providing  detailed 

information  about  their  function.  Further,  chemical  biology  employs  biological 

systems  to  create  non-natural  hybrids  between  biomolecules  and  synthetic  devices 

(for example emptied viral capsidsthat can deliver gene therapy or drug molecules).  



504 

6. 

Тexts on biology in english to high school  

 

Listening 



 

Solution 

 

We classify the organisms to study the diversity effectively and easily hence, it 



is necessary to arrange various kinds of organisms in an orderly manner. 

1.  We  see  microscopic  bacteria  of  the  range  of  few  micrometers  in  size.  e.g. 

Plasmodium, amoeba. They live for a short span of time e.g. blue green algae etc. 

2. We have bigger animals like 30 meters long or more e.g. blue whale etc. live 

for long life. 

3. We have even more large organisms as red wood tree of California living for 

thousands of years. 

The  Plant  Kingdom  can  be  further  classified  into  five  divisions.  Their  key 

characteristics are given below: 

1. Thallophytic:- The plant body is simple thallus type. The plant body is not 

differentiated  into  root,  stem  and  leaves.  They  are  commonly  known  as  algae. 

Examples: Spirogyra, char, Volvo, ulothtrix, etc. 

2.  Bryophyte:-  Plant  body  is  differentiated  into  stem  and  leaf  like  structure. 

Vascular  system  is  absent,  which  means  there  is  no  specialized  tissue  for 

transportation  of  water,  minerals  and  food.  Bryophytes  are  also  known  as  the 

amphibians of the plant kingdom, because they need water to complete a part of their 

life cycle. Examples: Moss, merchant. 

3. Pteridophyta:- Plant body is differentiated into root, stem and leaf. Vascular 

system is present. They do not bear seeds and hence are called cryptogams. Plants of 

rest  of  the  divisions  bear  seeds  and  hence  are  called  phanerogams.  Examples: 

Marisela, ferns, horse tails, etc. 

4. Gymnosperms:- They bear seeds. Seeds are naked, i.e. are not covered. The 

word  ‘gyms’  means  naked  and  ‘sperm’  means  seed.  They  are  perennial  plants. 

Examples: Pine, cycads, deodar, etc. 

5.  Angiosperms:-  The  seeds  are  covered.  The  word  ‘amigos’  means  covered. 

There  is  great  diversity  in  species  of  angiosperm.  Angiosperms  are  also  known  as 

flowering  plants,  because  flower  is  a  specialized  organ  meant  for  reproduction. 

Angiosperms  are  further  divided  into  two  groups,  viz.  monocotyledonous  and 

dicotyledonous. 

(a) Monocotyledonous: There is single seed leaf in a seed. A seed leaf is a baby 

plant. Examples: wheat, rice, maize, etc. 

(b)  Dicotyledonous:  There  are  two  cotyledons  in  a  seed.  Examples:  Mustard, 

gram, mango, etc.  

Biodiversity refers to all the diverse living organisms like plants, animals and 

micro-organisms present on earth. 

Kingdom Plantae: 

The  organisms  present  in  this  kingdom  are  eukaryotic,  green  autotrophs  and 

multicellular. 



505 

First they are differentiated on the basis of the plant body they divided on the 

basis of vascular systems then again divided them on the basis of occurrence of seed 

and then furthered divided on the basis of seeds are covered or not. 

 



1   ...   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал