Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет56/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   ...   70

 

Earth Chemistry 

 

The  chemical  term  earths  was  historically  applied  to  certain  chemical 

substances, once thought to be elements, and this name was borrowed from one of the 

four classical elements of Plato. "Earths" later turned out to be chemical compounds, 

albeit difficult to concentrate, such as rare earths and alkaline earths. 

Earths  are  metallic  oxides,  and  the  corresponding  metals  were  classified  into 

the corresponding groups: rare earth metals and alkaline earth metals 

Let’s take a moment for a closer look at the Earth’s chemistry; in particular, the 

chemical elements interspersed in the Earth’s major depths. 

With an atmosphere containing 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, the Earth is the 

only  planet  in  the  solar  system  capable  of  initiating  and  sustaining  life-forms;  the 

various chemical elements that make up the Earth, from the crust, down to the mantle 

and core, have a little something to do with that. 

Defining the Earth’s Boundaries and Elements 

As scientists are not able to visit the Earth’s deep interior or place instruments 

within it, they explore in subtle ways. One approach is to study the Earth with non-

material  probes,  such  as  seismic  waves  emitted  by  earthquakes.  As  seismic  waves 

pass  through  the  Earth,  they  undergo  sudden  changes  in  direction  and  velocity  at 

certain  depths.  These  depths  mark  the  major  boundaries,  also  called  discontinuities, 

that divide the Earth into crust, mantle and core. 

The  Crust.  The  Earth’s  crust  is  the  thin  outermost  layer  of  the  Earth,  with  an 

average depth of 24 km (15 mi). The crust accounts for 1.05% of the Earth’s volume 

and 0.5% of its mass. The chemical elements oxygen, silicon and aluminum dominate 

the  crustal  composition.  The  major  mineral  type  –  the  feldspars  –  are  alumino-

silicates  of  the  alkali  and  alkaline-earth  metals.  Silicon  dioxide  is  the  second  most 


485 

common group. 



The  Mantle.  The  mantle  extends  from  the  base  of  the  crust  to the  core  and  is 

about 2865 km (1780 mi) thick, occupying about 82.5% of the Earth’s volume. The 

upper  mantle  is  rich  in  olivine  and  pyroxenes.  The  major  mineral  type  in  the  lower 

mantle  appears  to  be  pyroxenes,  especially  magnesium  silicate.  Scientists  think  that 

the  lowest  layer  of  the  mantle  called  “D  layer”  is  richer  in  aluminum  and  calcium 

than the higher layers of the mantle.  

The Core. The core extends from the base of the mantle to the Earth’s center, 

and  is  6964  kn  (4327  mi)  in  diameter  –  accounting  for  only  16.3%  of  the  Earth’s 

volume, but 33.5% of its mass. The core is made up of two distinct parts – a liquid 

outer  core,  which  is  2260  km  (1404  mi)  thick,  and  a  solid  inner  core,  which  has  a 

radius  of  1222  km  (759  mi).  The  core  is  chemically  distinct  from  the  mantle  and 

contains  about  89%  iron  and  6%  nickel.  The  remaining  5%  is  made  of  lighter 

elements, possibly sulfur – but we cannot rule out the presence of oxygen and silicon, 

in light of a 2013 study published in Nature, which calls them “prime candidates” for 

the lighter elements in the Earth’s core. 

Earth Chemistry 

As we celebrate Earth Day, and as in recent times, emphasis has been given to 

environmental awareness or the value of “green.” This year, let’s pay attention to all 

the other colors of Earth as well – the colors we see through chemistry. 

 

 

 

Chemistry of Carbon and Its Compounds 

 

PrevNextchapter List 



Carbon: Introduction 

Atomic Number: 6  

Electronic configuration: 2, 4  

Valence electrons: 4 

Property: Non-metal 

Abundance:  Carbon  is  the  4th  most  abundant  substance  in  universe  and  15th 

most abundant substance in the earth’s crust. 

Compounds having carbon atoms among the components are known as carbon 

compounds.  Previously,  carbon  compounds  could  only  be  obtained  from  a  living 

source; hence they are also known as organic compounds. 

Bonding In Carbon: Covalent Bond 

Bond  formed  by  sharing  of  electrons  is  called  covalent  bond.  Two  of  more 

atoms share electrons to make their configuration stable. In this type of bond, all the 

atoms  have  similar  rights  over  shared  electrons.  Compounds  which  are  formed 

because of covalent bond are called COVALNET COMPOUNDS. 

Covalent bonds are of three types: Single, double and triple covalent bond. 

Single  Covalent  Bond:  Single  covalent  bond  is  formed  because  of  sharing  of 

two electrons, one from each of the two atoms. 

Formation of hydrogen molecule (H

2



486 

Atomic Number of H = 1 

Electronic configuration of H = 1 

Valence electron of H = 1 

Hydrogen  forms  a  duet,  to  obtain  stable  configuration.  This  configuration  is 

similar to helium (a noble gas). 

Since,  hydrogen  has  one  electron  in  its  valence  shell,  so  it  requires  one  more 

electron to form a duet. So, in the formation of hydrogen molecule; one electron from 

each of the hydrogen atoms is shared. 

 

Formation of hydrogen chloride (HCl): 



Valence electron of hydrogen = 1 

Atomic number of chlorine = 17 

Electronic configuration of chlorine: 2, 8, 7 

Electrons in outermost orbit = 7 

Valence electron = 7 

 

Formation of chlorine molecule (Cl



2

): 


Valence electron of chlorine = 7 

 

Formation of water (H



2

O) 


Valence electron of hydrogen = 1 

Atomic number of oxygen = 8 

Electronic configuration of oxygen = 2, 6 

Valence electron = 6 

 

Oxygen  in  water  molecule  completes  stable  configuration  by  the  sharing  one 



electron from each of the two hydrogen atoms. 

Formation of Methane (CH

4



Valence electron of carbon = 4 



Valence electron of hydrogen = 1 

487 

 

Formation of Ethane (C



2

H

6



): 

 

 



Double  covalent  bond:  Double  bond  is  formed  by  sharing  of  four  electrons, 

two from each of the two atoms. 

Formation of oxygen molecule (O

2

): 



Valence electron of oxygen = 2 

 

In the formation of oxygen molecule, two electrons are shared by each of the 



two oxygen atoms to complete their stable configuration. 

In  oxygen,  the  total number  of  shared  electrons  is  four,  two  from  each  of  the 

oxygen atoms. So a double covalent bond is formed. 

Formation of Carbon dioxide (CO

2

): 


Valence electron of carbon = 4 

Valence electron of oxygen = 6 

 

In carbon dioxide two double covalent bonds are formed. 



Formation of Ethylene (C

2

H



4

): 


Valence electron of carbon = 4 

Valence electron of hydrogen = 1 

 

Triple Covalent Bond: Triple covalent bond is formed because of the sharing of 



six electrons, three from each of the two atoms. 

 

Formation of Nitrogen (N



2

): 


Atomic number of nitrogen = 7 

Electronic configuration of nitrogen = 2, 5 

Valence electron = 5 


488 

 

In the formation of nitrogen, three electrons are shared by each of the nitrogen 



atoms. Thus one triple bond is formed because of the sharing of total six electrons. 

Formation of Acetylene (C

2

H

2



): 

 

Properties of Covalent Bond: 



-

 

Intermolecular force is smaller. 



-

 

Covalent bonds are weaker than ionic bond. As a result, covalent compounds 



have low melting and boiling points. 

-

 



Covalent  compounds  are  poor  conductor  of  electricity  as  no  charged 

particles are formed in covalent bond. 

-

 

Since, carbon compounds are formed by the formation of covalent bond, so 



carbon  compounds  generally  have  low  melting  and  boiling  points  and  are  poor 

conductor of electricity. 

 

5.1  Biochemistry,  sometimes  called  biological  chemistry,  is  the  study  of 



chemical  processes  within  and  relating  to  living  organisms.

[1]


By  controlling 

information  flow  through  biochemical  signaling  and  the  flow  of  chemical  energy 

through metabolism, biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. Over 

the  last  decades  of  the  20th  century,  biochemistry  has  become  so  successful  at 

explaining living processes that now almost all areas of the life sciences from botany 

to medicine to genetics are engaged in biochemical research.

[2]

 Today, the main focus 



of  pure  biochemistry  is  on  understanding  how  biological  molecules  give  rise  to  the 

processes  that  occur  within  living  cells,

[3]

  which  in  turn  relates  greatly  to  the  study 



and understanding of tissues, organs, and whole organisms

[4]


—that is, all of biology. 

Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular 

mechanisms  by  which  genetic  information  encoded  inDNA  is  able  to  result  in  the 

processes  of  life.

[5]

  Depending  on  the  exact  definition  of  the  terms  used,  molecular 



biology can be thought of as a branch of biochemistry, or biochemistry as a tool with 

which to investigate and study molecular biology. 

Much  of  biochemistry  deals  with  the  structures,  functions  and  interactions  of 

biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, 

which  provide  the  structure  of  cells  and  perform  many  of  the  functions  associated 

with  life.

[6]

  The  chemistry  of  the  cell  also  depends  on  the  reactions  of  smaller 



molecules  and  ions.  These  can  be  inorganic,  for  example  water  andmetal  ions,  or 

organic,  for  example  the  amino  acids,  which  are  used  to  synthesize  proteins.

[7]

  The 


mechanisms  by  which  cells  harness  energy  from  their  environment  via  chemical 

489 

reactions  are  known  as  metabolism.  The  findings  of  biochemistry  are  applied 

primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate 

the causes and cures of diseases.

[8]

 In nutrition, they study how to maintain health and 



study  the  effects of nutritional deficiencies.

[9]


  In  agriculture,  biochemists  investigate 

soil andfertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage 

and pest control. 

Biochemistry  is  the  branch  of  science  that  explores  the  chemical  processes 

within  and  related  to  living  organisms.  It  is  a  laboratory  based  science  that  brings 

together  biology  and  chemistry.  By  using  chemical  knowledge  and  techniques, 

biochemists can understand and solve biological problems. 

 

 



Biochemistry  focuses  on  processes  happening  at  a  molecular  level.  It  focuses 

on  what’s  happening  inside  our  cells,  studying  components  like  proteins,  lipids  and 

organelles.  It  also  looks  at  how  cells  communicate  with  each  other,  for  example 

during  growth  or  fighting  illness.  Biochemists need to  understand how the structure 

of  a  molecule  relates  to  its  function,  allowing  them  to  predict  how  molecules  will 

interact. 

Biochemistry  covers  a  range  of  scientific  disciplines,  including  genetics, 

microbiology,  forensics,  plant  science  and  medicine.  Because  of  its  breadth, 

biochemistry is very important and advances in this field of science over the past 100 

years have been staggering. It’s a very exciting time to be part of this fascinating area 

of study. 

 

What do biochemists do? 

 

-

 



Provide new ideas and experiments to understand how life works 

-

 



Support our understanding of health and disease 

-

 



Contribute innovative information to the technology revolution 

-

 



Work  alongside  chemists,  physicists,  healthcare  professionals,  policy 

makers, engineers and many more professionals 

Biochemists work in many places, including: 

-

 



Hospitals 

-

 



Universities 

-

 



Agriculture 

-

 



Food institutes 

-

 



Education 

-

 



Cosmetics 

490 

-

 



Forensic crime research 

-

 



Drug discovery and development 

 Biochemists have many transferable skills, including: 

-

 

Analytical 



-

 

Communication 



-

 

Research 



-

 

Problem solving 



-

 

 Numerical 



-

 

Written 



-

 

Observational 



-

 

Planning 



 The  life  science  community  is  a  fast-paced,  interactive  network  with  global 

career  opportunities  at  all  levels.  The  Government  recognizes  the  potential  that 

developments in biochemistry and the life sciences have for contributing to national 

prosperity  and  for  improving  the  quality  of  life  of  the  population.  Funding  for 

research  in  these  areas  has  been  increasing  dramatically  in  most  countries,  and  the 

biotechnology industry is expanding rapidly. 

At  its  broadest  definition,  biochemistry  can  be  seen  as  a  study  of  the 

components and composition of living things and how they come together to become 

life,  and  the  history  of  biochemistry  may  therefore  go  back  as  far  as  the  ancient 

Greeks.


[10]

 However, biochemistry as a specific scientific discipline has its beginning 

some  time  in  the  19th  century,  or  a  little  earlier,  depending  on  which  aspect  of 

biochemistry  one  is  being  focused  on.  Some  argued  that  the  beginning  of 

biochemistry may have been the discovery of the first enzyme, diastase (today called 

amylase),  in  1833  byAnselme  Payen,

[11]

  while  others  considered  Eduard  Buchner's 



first demonstration of a complex biochemical process alcoholic fermentation in cell-

free extracts in 1897 to be the birth of biochemistry.

[12][13]

 Some might also point as 

its beginning to the influential 1842 work by Justus von Liebig,Animal chemistry, or, 

Organic chemistry in its applications to physiology and pathology, which presented a 

chemical  theory  of  metabolism,

[10]

  or  even  earlier  to  the  18th  century  studies  on 



fermentation  and respiration by  Antoine Lavoisier.

[14][15]


 Many  other pioneers  in the 

field  who  helped  to  uncover  the  layers  of  complexity  of  biochemistry  have  been 

proclaimed founders of modern biochemistry, for example Emil Fischer for his work 

on  the  chemistry  of  proteins,

[16]

  and  F.  Gowland  Hopkins  on  enzymes  and  the 



dynamic nature of biochemistry.

[17]


 

The  term  "biochemistry"  itself  is  derived  from  a  combination  of  biology  and 

chemistry.  In  1877,  Felix  Hoppe-Seyler  used  the  term  (biochemie  in  German)  as  a 

synonym for physiological chemistry in the foreword to the first issue of Zeitschrift 



für Physiologische Chemie (Journal of Physiological Chemistry) where he argued for 

the setting up of institutes dedicated to this field of study.

[18][19]

 The German chemist 

Carl  Neuberghowever  is  often  cited  to  have  been  coined  the  word  in  1903,

[20][21][22]

 

while some credited it to Franz Hofmeister.



[23]

 


491 

 

DNA structure (1D65)



[24]

 

It  was  once  generally  believed  that  life  and  its  materials  had  some  essential 



property  or  substance  (often  referred  to  as  the  "vital  principle")  distinct  from  any 

found in non-living matter, and it was thought that only living beings could produce 

the  molecules  of  life.

[25]


  Then,  in  1828,  Friedrich  Wöhler  published  a  paper  on  the 

synthesis of urea, proving that organic compounds can be created artificially.

[26]

 Since 


then,  biochemistry  has  advanced,  especially  since  the  mid-20th  century,  with  the 

development  of  new  techniques  such  as  chromatography,  X-ray  diffraction,  dual 

polarisation  interferometry,  NMR  spectroscopy,  radioisotopic  labeling,  electron 

microscopy,  and  molecular  dynamics  simulations.  These  techniques  allowed  for  the 

discovery  and  detailed  analysis  of  many  molecules  and  metabolic  pathways  of  the 

cell, such as glycolysis and theKrebs cycle (citric acid cycle). 

Another significant historic event in biochemistry is the discovery of the gene 

and its role in the transfer of information in the cell. This part of biochemistry is often 

called molecular biology.

[27]


 In the 1950s, James D. Watson, Francis Crick, Rosalind 

Franklin,  and  Maurice  Wilkins  were  instrumental  in  solving  DNA  structure  and 

suggesting  its  relationship  with  genetic  transfer  of  information.

[28]


  In  1958,  George 

Beadle and Edward Tatum received the Nobel Prize for work in fungi showing that 

one  gene  produces  one  enzyme.

[29]


  In  1988,  Colin  Pitchfork  was  the  first  person 

convicted of murder with DNA evidence, which led to growth of forensic science.

[30]

 

More recently, Andrew Z. Fire and Craig C. Mello received the2006 Nobel Prize for 



discovering  the  role  of  RNA  interference  (RNAi),  in  the  silencing  of  gene 

expression.

[31]

 

Starting materials: the chemical elements of life[edit] 



492 

 

The  main  elements  that  compose  the  human  body  are  shown  from  most 



abundant (by mass) to least abundant. 

Main articles: Composition of the human body and Dietary mineral 

Around  two  dozen  of  the  92  naturally  occurring  chemical  elements  are 

essential  to  various  kinds  of  biological  life.  Most  rare  elements  on  Earth  are  not 

needed  by  life  (exceptions  being  selenium  and  iodine),  while  a  few  common  ones 

(aluminum and titanium) are not used. Most organisms share element needs, but there 

are  a  few  differences  between  plants  and  animals.  For  example,  ocean  algae  use 

bromine, but land plants and animals seem to need none. All animals require sodium, 

but some plants do not. Plants need boron and silicon, but animals may not (or may 

need ultra-small amounts). 

Just  six  elements—carbon,  hydrogen,  nitrogen,  oxygen,  calcium,  and 

phosphorus—make up almost 99% of the mass of living cells, including those in the 

human body (see composition of the human body for a complete list). In addition to 

the  six  major  elements  that  compose  most  of  the  human  body,  humans  require 

smaller amounts of possibly 18 more.

[32]

 

Biomolecules[edit] 



The four main classes of molecules in biochemistry (often called biomolecules) 

are  carbohydrates,  lipids,  proteins,  and  nucleic  acids.

[33]

  Many  biological  molecules 



are polymers: in this terminology, monomers are relatively small micromolecules that 

are  linked  together  to  create  largemacromolecules  known  as  polymers.  When 

monomers  are  linked  together  to  synthesize  a  biological  polymer,  they  undergo  a 

process  calleddehydration  synthesis.  Different  macromolecules  can  assemble  in 

larger complexes, often needed for biological activity. 

 

Carbohydrates 

 

Main 



articles: 

Carbohydrate, 

Monosaccharide, 

Disaccharide, 

and 

Polysaccharide 

Carbohydrates 



493 

 

Glucose, a monosaccharide 



 

A molecule of sucrose (glucose +fructose), a disaccharide 

 

Amylose, a polysaccharide made up of several thousand glucose units 



The function of carbohydrates includes energy storage and providing structure. 

Sugars  are  carbohydrates,  but  not  all  carbohydrates  are  sugars.  There  are  more 

carbohydrates on Earth than any other known type of biomolecule; they are used to 

store  energy  and  genetic  information,  as  well  as  play  important  roles  in  cell  to  cell 

interactions and communications. 

The  simplest  type  of  carbohydrate  is  a  monosaccharide,  which  among  other 

properties  contains  carbon,  hydrogen,  and  oxygen,  mostly  in  a  ratio  of  1:2:1 

(generalized formula C



n

H

2n



O

n

, where n is at least 3). Glucose (C

6

H

12



O

6

) is one of the 



most  important  carbohydrates,  others  include  fructose  (C

6

H



12

O

6



),  the  sugar 

commonly associated with the sweet taste of fruits,

[34][a]

 and deoxyribose (C



5

H

10



O

4

). 



A  monosaccharide  can  switch  from  the  acyclic  (open-chain)  form  to  a  cyclic 

form, through a nucleophilic addition reaction between thecarbonyl group and one of 

the  hydroxyls  of  the  same  molecule.  The  reaction  creates  a  ring  of  carbon  atoms 

closed  by  one  bridgingoxygen  atom.  The  resulting  molecule  has  an  hemiacetal  or 

hemiketal  group,  depending  on  whether  the  linear  form  was  an  aldose  or  a  ketose. 

The reaction is easily reversed, yielding the original open-chain form.

[35]

 

 



Conversion between the furanose, acyclic, and pyranose forms of D-glucose. 

In these cyclic forms, the ring usually has 5 or 6 atoms. These forms are called 

furanoses  and  pyranoses,  respectively  —  by  analogy  withfuran  and  pyran,  the 


494 

simplest  compounds  with  the  same  carbon-oxygen  ring  (although  they  lack  the 

double  bonds  of  these  two  molecules).  For  example,  the  aldohexose  glucose  may 

form  a  hemiacetal  linkage  between  the  hydroxyl  on  carbon  1  and  the  oxygen  on 

carbon  4,  yielding  a  molecule  with  a  5-membered  ring,  called  glucofuranose.  The 

same reaction can take place between carbons 1 and 5 to form a molecule with a 6-

membered ring, called glucopyranose. Cyclic forms with a 7-atom ring (the same of 

oxepane), rarely encountered, are called heptoses. 

When  two  monosaccharides  undergo  dehydration  synthesis  whereby  a 

molecule of water is released, as two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom are lost 

from  the  two  monosaccharides.  The  new  molecule,  consisting  of  two 

monosaccharides,  is called  a disaccharide  and is  conjoined together by  a  glycosidic 

or ether bond. The reverse reaction can also occur, using a molecule of water to split 

up a disaccharide and break the glycosidic bond; this is termed hydrolysis. The most 

well-known  disaccharide  is  sucrose,  ordinary  sugar  (in  scientific  contexts,  called 

table sugar or cane sugar to differentiate it from other sugars). Sucrose consists of a 

glucose  molecule  and  a  fructose  molecule  joined  together.  Another  important 

disaccharide is lactose, consisting of a glucose molecule and a galactose molecule. As 

most humans age, the production of lactase, the enzyme that hydrolyzes lactose back 

into glucose and galactose, typically decreases. This results in lactase deficiency, also 

called lactose intolerance

When  a  few  (around  three  to  six)  monosaccharides  are  joined,  it  is  called  an 

oligosaccharide (oligo- meaning "few"). These molecules tend to be used as markers 

and  signals,  as  well  as  having  some  other  uses.

[36]

  Many  monosaccharides  joined 



together make a polysaccharide. They can be joined together in one long linear chain, 

or they may bebranched. Two of the most common polysaccharides are cellulose and 

glycogen,  both  consisting  of  repeating  glucose  monomers.  Examples  are  Cellulose 

which is an important structural component of plant's cell walls, and glycogen, used 

as a form of energy storage in animals. 

Sugar  can  be  characterized  by  having  reducing  or  non-reducing  ends.  A 

reducing end of a carbohydrate is a carbon atom that can be in equilibrium with the 

open-chain aldehyde(aldose) or keto form (ketose). If the joining of monomers takes 

place at such a carbon atom, the free hydroxy group of the pyranose or furanose form 

is  exchanged  with  an  OH-side-chain  of  another  sugar,  yielding  a  full  acetal.  This 

prevents opening of the chain to the aldehyde or keto form and renders the modified 

residue non-reducing. Lactose contains a reducing end at its glucose moiety, whereas 

the galactose moiety form a full acetal with the C4-OH group of glucose. Saccharose 

does not have a reducing end because of full acetal formation between the aldehyde 

carbon of glucose (C1) and the keto carbon of fructose (C2). 



1   ...   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал