Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет55/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   ...   70

Table 1. The table below displays numerous values and equations utilized when 

observing chemical kinetics for numerous reactions types 

 

Zero-


Order 

First-Order 

Second-Order 


476 

Rate Law 

 Rate= k  

Rate= k[A]  

Rate= k[A]2 

Integrated Rate Law 

[A]

t



−kt+[A]

0

  



ln[A]

t



−kt+ln[A]

0

  



1[A]

t

=−kt+1[A]



0

 

Units  of  Rate  Constant 



(k): 

molL


−1

s

−1



 

s

−1



 

Lmol


−1

s

−1



  

Linear Plot to Determine 

(k): 

[A]  versus 



time 

ln[A]  versus 

time 

 versus time 



Relationship  of  Rate 

Constant to the Slope of 

Straight Line: 

slope= 


−k  

slope= 


−k  

slope= k  

Half-life: 

  

 



 

Sample Problems 

1. Define Reaction Rate 

2.  TRUE  or  FALSE:  Changes  in  the  temperature  or  the  introduction  of  a 

catalyst will affect the rate constant of a reaction 

For sample problems 3-6, use Formula 6 to answer the questions 

H2O

⟶2H2+O2(6)(6)H2O⟶2H2+O2 



*Assume the reaction occurs at constant temperature 

3. For the given reaction above, state the rate law. 

4. State the overall order of the reaction. 

5. Find the rate, given k = 1.14 x 10

-2

 and [H


2

O] = 2.04M 

6. Find the half-life of the reaction. 

Answers 


1.  Reaction  Rate  is  the  measure  of  the  change  in  concentration  of  the 

disappearance  of  reactants  or  the  change  in  concentration  of  the  appearance  of 

products per unit time. 

2.  FALSE.  The  rate  constant  is  not  dependant  on  the  presence  of  a  catalyst. 

Catalysts, however, can effect the total rate of a reaction. 

3. Rate= k[H

2

O] Rate= k[H



2

O] 


4. First - Order 

5. 2.33 x 10

-2 

s

-1



 

6. 29.7 s 

3.3. A chemical equation is the symbolic representation of a chemical reaction 


477 

in  the  form  of  symbols  and  formulae,  wherein  the  reactant  entities  are  given  on  the 

left-hand side and the product entities on the right-hand side.

[1]


 The coefficients next 

to the symbols and formulae of entities are the absolute values of the stoichiometric 

numbers. The first chemical equation was diagrammed by Jean Beguin in 1615.

[2]


 

A  chemical  equation  consists  of  the  chemical  formulas  of  the  reactants  (the 

starting substances) and the chemical formula of the products (substances formed in 

the chemical reaction). The two are separated by an arrow symbol (

, usually read 

as  "yields")  and  each  individual  substance's  chemical  formula  is  separated  from 

others by a plus sign. 

As an example, the equation for the reaction of hydrochloric acid with sodium 

can be denoted: 

 2 HCl +2 Na 

→2 NaCl + H 2 

This equation would be read as "two HCl plus two Na yields two NaCl and H 

two." But, for equations involving complex chemicals, rather than reading the letter 

and its subscript, the chemical formulas are read using IUPAC nomenclature. Using 

IUPAC nomenclature, this equation would be read as "hydrochloric acid plus sodium 

yields sodium chloride andhydrogen gas." 

This equation indicates that sodium and HCl react to form NaCl and H

2

. It also 



indicates  that  two  sodium  molecules  are  required  for  every  two  hydrochloric  acid 

molecules  and  the  reaction  will  form  two  sodium  chloride  molecules  and  one 

diatomic molecule of hydrogen gas molecule for every two hydrochloric acid and two 

sodium molecules that react. Thestoichiometric coefficients (the numbers in front of 

the  chemical  formulas)  result  from  the  law  of  conservation  of  mass  and  the  law  of 

conservation of charge 

Chemical  reactions  happen  all  around  us:  when  we  light  aMATCH ,  start  a 

car,  eat  dinner,  or  walk  the  dog.  A  chemical  reaction  is  the  process  by  which 

substances bond together (or break bonds) and, in doing so, either release or consume 

energy (see our Chemical Reactions module). A chemical equation is shorthand that 

scientists use to describe a chemical reaction. Let's take the reaction of hydrogen with 

oxygen  to  form  water  as  an  example.  If  we  had  a  container  of  hydrogen  gas  and 

burned this in the presence of oxygen, the two gases would react together, releasing 

energy,  to  form  water.  To  write  the  chemical  equation  for  this  reaction,  we  would 

place  the  substances  reacting  (the  reactants)  on  the  left  side  of  an  equation  with  an 

arrow pointing to the substances being formed on the right side of the equation (the 

products). Given this information, one might guess that the equation for this reaction 

is written: 



H + O 

→  H



2

O 

The  plus  sign  on  the  left  side  of  the  equation  means  that  hydrogen  (H)  and 

oxygen  (O)  are  reacting.  Unfortunately,  there  are  two  problems  with  this  chemical 

equation.  First,  because  atoms  like  to  have  full  valence  shells,  single  H  or  O  atoms 

are  rare.  In  nature,  both  hydrogen  and  oxygen  are  found  asdiatomic  molecules,  H

2

 



and  O

2

,  respectively  (in  forming  diatomic  molecules  the  atoms  shareelectrons  and 



complete  their  valence  shells).  Hydrogen  gas,  therefore,  consists  of  H

2

  molecules; 



478 

oxygen gas consists of O

2

. Correcting our equation we get: 



H

2

 + O



2

 

→  H



2

O 

But  we  still  have  one  problem.  As  written,  this  equation  tells  us  that  one 

hydrogen  molecule  (with  two  H  atoms)  reacts  with  one  oxygen  molecule  (two  O 

atoms)  to  form  one  water  molecule  (with  two  Hatoms  and  one  O  atom).  In  other 

words, we seem to have lost one O atom along the way! To write a chemical equation 

correctly,  the  number  of  atoms  on  the  left  side  of  a  chemical  equation  has  to  be 

precisely  balanced  with  the  atoms  on  the  right  side  of  the  equation.  How  does  this 

happen?  In  actuality,  the  O  atom  that  we  "lost"  reacts  with  a  second  molecule  of 

hydrogen to form a second molecule of water. During the reaction, the H-H and O-O 

bonds  break  and  H-O  bonds  form  in  the  water  molecules,  as  seen  in  the  simulation 

below. 

 

Interactive Animation:The formation of water 



 

The balanced equation is therefore written: 

 2H

2

 + O



2

 

→  2H



2

In  writing  chemical  equations,  the  number  in  front  of  the  molecule's  symbol 



(called a coefficient) indicates the number of molecules participating in the reaction. 

If no coefficient appears in front of a molecule, we interpret this as meaning one. 

In order to write a correct chemical equation, we must balance all of the atoms 

on the left side of thereaction with the atoms on the right side. Let's look at another 

example.  If  you  use  a  gas  stove  to  cook  your  dinner,  chances  are  that  your  stove 

burns  natural  gas,  which  is  primarily  methane.  Methane  (CH

4

)  is  a  molecule  that 



contains four hydrogen atoms bonded to one carbon atom. When you lightthe stove, 

you are supplying the activation energy to start the reaction of methane with oxygen 

in  the  air.  During  this  reaction,  chemical  bonds  break  and  re-form  and  the  products 

that are produced are carbon dioxide and water vapor (and, of course, light and heat 

that you see as the flame). The unbalanced chemical equation would be written: 

CH

4



 (methane) + O

2

 (oxygen) 



→  CO

2

 (carbon dioxide) + H



2

O (water) 

Look at the reaction atom by atom. On the left side of the equation we find one 

carbon atom, and one on the right. 

H

4



 

O



2

 

→ 



O

2



 

H



2

 



479 

↑ 



carbon 

 

 



 

↑ 



carbon 

 

 



 

Next we move to hydrogen: There are four hydrogen atoms on the left side of 

the equation, but only two on the right. 

4



 

2



 

→ 



O

2

 



H

2



 

 



↑ 

hydro



gen 

 

 



 

 

 



↑ 

hydro



gen 

Therefore, we must balance the H atoms by adding the coefficient "2" in front 

of  the  water  molecule(you  can  only  change  coefficients  in  a  chemical  equation,  not 

subscripts). Adding this coefficient we get: 

H

4



 

O



2

 

→ 



O

2



 

2H



2

 



 

↑ 



hydro

gen 


 

 

 



 

 

↑ 



4 hydrogen 

What  this  equation  now  says  is  that  two  molecules  of  water  are  produced  for 

every one molecule of methane consumed. Moving on to the oxygen atoms, we find 

two on the left side of the equation, but a total of four on the right side (two from the 

CO

2

 molecule and one from each of two water molecules H



2

O). 


H

4



 

O



2

 

→ 



O

2



 

2H



2

 



 

↑ 



oxygen 

 

 



 

 

 



↑ 

oxygen 



To  balance  the  chemical  equation  we  must  add  the  coefficient  "2"  in  front  of 

the  oxygen  molecule  on  the  left  side  of  the  equation,  showing  that  two  oxygen 

molecules are consumed for every one methane molecule that burns. 

H



4

 



2O

2

 



→ 

O



2

 



2H

2

 



 

↑ 



oxygen 


 

 

 



 

 

↑ 



4 oxygen 

Dalton's  law  of  definite  proportions  holds  true  for  all  chemical  reactions  (see 

our  Early  Ideas  about  Matter:  From  Democritus to  Dalton  module).  In  essence,  this 

law states that a chemical reactionalways proceeds according to the ratio defined by 

the  balanced  chemical  equation.  Thus,  you  can  interpret  the  balanced  methane 

equation  above  as  reading,  "one  part  methane  reacts  with  two  parts  oxygen  to 

produce one part carbon dioxide and two parts water." This ratio always remains the 


480 

same.  For  example,  if  we  start  with  two  parts  methane,  then  we  will  consume  four 

parts  O

2

  and  generate  two  parts  CO



2

  and  four  parts  H

2

O.  If  we  start  with  excess  of 



any of the reactants (e.g., five parts oxygen when only one part methane is available), 

the excess reactant will not be consumed: 

H

4



 

5O



2

 

→  C  O



2

 



2H

2

 





3O

2

 



Excessreactantswill not be consumed. 

In  the  example  seen  above,  3O

2

  had  to  be  added  to  the  right  side  of  the 



equation  to  balance  it  and  show  that  the  excess  oxygen  is  not  consumed  during  the 

reaction. In this example, methane is called the limiting reactant

Although we have discussed balancing equations in terms of numbers of atoms 

and  molecules,  keep  in  mind  that  we  never  talk  about  a  single  atom  (or  molecule) 

when we use chemical equations. This is because single atoms (and molecules) are so 

tiny that they are difficult to isolate. Chemical equations are discussed in relation to 

the number of moles of reactants and products used or produced (see our The Mole 

module). Because the mole refers to a standard number of atoms (or molecules), the 

term can simply be substituted into chemical equations. Thus, the balanced methane 

equation above can also be interpreted as reading, "one mole of methane reacts with 

two  moles  of  oxygen  to  produce  one  mole  of  carbon  dioxide  and  two  moles  of 

water." 


 

Lewis Theory 

 

The  Lewis  definition  is  the  most  general  theory,  having  no  requirements  for 



solubility or protons. 

Lewis Acids and Bases 

1.

 

An acid is a substance that accepts a lone pair of electrons. 



2.

 

A base is a substance that donates a lone pair electrons. 



Lewis acids and bases react to create an adduct, a compound in which the acid 

and  base  have  bonded  by  sharing  the  electron  pair.  Lewis  acid/base  reactions  are 

different from redox reactions because there is no change in oxidation state. 

 

This  reaction  shows a  Lewis base  (NH



3

) donating  an electron pair to  a  Lewis 

acid (H

+

) to form an adduct (NH



4

+

). 



Amphoterism and Water[edit] 

Substances capable of acting as either an acid or a base are amphoteric. Water 

is  the  most  important  amphoteric  substance.  It  can  ionize  into  hydroxide  (OH

-

,  a 



base) or hydronium (H

3

O



+

, an acid). By doing so, water is 



481 

1.

 



Increasing the H

+

 or OH



-

 concentration (Arrhenius), 

2.

 

Donating or accepting a proton (Brønsted-Lowry), and 



3.

 

Accepting or donating an electron pair (Lewis). 



 

Important  A  bare  proton  (H

+

  ion)  cannot 



exist  in  water.  It  will  form  a  hydrogen  bond  to 

the 


nearest 

water 


molecule, 

creating 

thehydronium  ion  (H

3

O



+

).  Although  many 

equations  and  definitions  may  refer  to  the 

"concentration  of  H

+

  ions",  that  is  a  misleading 



abbreviation.  Technically,  there  are  no  H

+

  ions, 



only  hydronium  (H

3

O



+

)  ions.  Fortunately,  the 

number  of  hydronium  ions  formed  is  exactly 

equal to the number of hydrogen ions, so the two 

can be used interchangeably. 

 

H



+

 ions actually exist as hydronium, H

3

O

+



Water  will  dissociate  very  slightly  (which  further  explains  its  amphoteric 

properties). 

 

The  presence  of  hydrogen  ions 



indicates  an  acid,  whereas  the  presence 

of  hydroxide  ions  indicates  a  base. 

Being  neutral,  water  dissociates  into 

both equally. 

 

This  equation  is  more  accurate—



hydrogen  ions  do  not  exist  in  water 

because they bond to form hydronium. 



Helpful Hint! 

Although the other halogens make strong acids, hydrofluoric acid (HF) is a 

weak  acid.  Despite  being  weak,  it  is  incredibly  corrosive—hydrofluoric  acid 

dissolves glass and metal! 

Most acids and bases are weak. You should be familiar with the most common 

strong acids and assume that any other acids are weak. 

Formula 

Strong Acid 

HClO

4

 



Perchloric acid 

HNO


3

 

Nitric acid 



482 

H

2



SO

4

 



Sulfuric acid 

HCl, HBr, HI  Hydrohalic acids 

Within  a  series  of  oxyacids,  the  ions  with  the  greatest  number  of  oxygen 

molecules  are  the  strongest.  For  example,  nitric  acid  (HNO



3

)  is  strong,  but  nitrous 

acid (HNO

2

) is weak. Perchloric acid (HClO

4

) is stronger than chloric acid (HClO



3

), 


which is stronger than the weak chlorous acid (HClO

2

). Hypochlorous acid (HClO) is 



the weakest of the four. 

Common strong bases are the hydroxides of Group 1 and most Group 2 metals. 

For example, potassium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide are some of the strongest 

bases.  You  can  assume  that  any  other  bases  (including  ammonia  and  ammonium 

hydroxide) are weak. 

Formula  Strong Base 

LiOH 

Lithium hydroxide 



NaOH 

Sodium hydroxide 

KOH 

Potassium hydroxide 



RbOH 

Rubidium hydroxide 

CsOH 

Cesium hydroxide 



Ca(OH)

2

  Calcium hydroxide 



Sr(OH)

2

  Strontium hydroxide 



Ba(OH)

2

  Barium hydroxide 



 

 

Acids and bases that are strong are not necessarily concentrated, and weak 



acids/bases  are  not  necessarily  dilute.  Concentration  has  nothing  to  do  with  the 

ability  of  a  substance  to  dissociate.  Furthermore,  polyprotic  acids  are  not 

necessarily stronger than monoprotic acids. 

Properties of Acids and Bases 

Now  that  you  are  aware  of  the  acid-base  theories,  you  can  learn  about  the 

physical  and  chemical  properties  of  acids  and  bases.  Acids  and  bases  have  very 

different properties, allowing them to be distinguished by observation. 

Indicators 


483 

 

Bromothymol blue is an indicator that turns blue in a base, or yellow in acid. 



Made with special chemical compounds that react slightly with an acid or base, 

indicators will change color in the presence of an acid or base. A common indicator is 

litmus paper. Litmus paper turns red in acidic conditions and blue in basic conditions. 

Phenolphthalein purple is colorless in acidic and neutral solutions, but it turns purple 

once the solution becomes basic. It is useful when attempting to neutralize an acidic 

solution; once the indicator turns purple, enough base has been added. 



Conductivity 

 

A  less  informative  method  is  to  test  for  conductivity.  Acids  and  bases  in 



aqueous  solutions  will  conduct  electricity  because  they  contain  dissolved  ions. 

Therefore,  acids  and  bases  are  electrolytes.  Strong  acids  and  bases  will  be  strong 

electrolytes. Weak acids and bases will be weak electrolytes. This affects the amount 

of conductivity. 

However,  acids  will  react  with  metal,  so  testing  conductivity  may  not  be 

plausible. 

Physical properties 

The physical properties of acids and bases are opposites. 

 

Acids 


Bases 

Taste 


sour 

bitter 


Feel 

stinging 

slippery 

Odor 


sharp 

odorless 

These properties are very general; they may not be true for every single acid or 

base. 


Another  warning:  if  an  acid  or  base  is  spilled,  it  must  be  cleaned  up 

immediately  and  properly  (according  to  the  procedures  of  the  lab  you  are  working 

in).  If,  for  example,  sodium  hydroxide  is  spilled,  the  water  will  begin  to  evaporate. 

Sodium  hydroxide  does  not  evaporate,  so  the  concentration  of  the  base  steadily 

increases until it becomes damaging to its surrounding surfaces. 

 

Chemical Reactions 

 

Neutralization 

Acids  will  react  with  bases to  form  a  salt and  water.  This  is a neutralization 



484 

reaction. The products of a neutralization reaction are much less acidic or basic than 

the reactants were. For example, sodium hydroxide (a base) is added to hydrochloric 

acid. 


This is a double replacement reaction. 

Acids 

 

Acids  react  with  metal  to 



produce  a  metal  salt  and  hydrogen 

gas bubbles. 

 

Acids 


react 

with 


metal 

carbonates to produce water, CO

2

 gas 


bubbles, and a salt. 

 

Acids  react  with  metal  oxides 



to produce water and a salt. 

Bases 

Bases  are  typically  less  reactive  and violent  than  acids.  They  do  still  undergo 

many chemical reactions, especially with organic compounds. A common reactions is 

saponificiation: the reaction of a base with fat or oil to create soap. 



1   ...   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал