Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет54/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   70

Metal 

Ion 

Reactivity 

Extraction 

Caesium Cs 

Cs

+

 



react with cold water 

electrolysis

 

Francium Fr 



Fr

+

 



Rubidium Rb 

Rb

+



 

Potassium K 

K

+

 



Sodium Na 

Na

+



 

Lithium Li 

Li

+

 



Barium Ba 

Ba

2+



 

Radium Ra 

Ra

2+

 



Strontium Sr 

Sr

2+



 

Calcium Ca 

Ca

2+

 



Magnesium Mg 

Mg

2+



 

reacts  very  slowly  with  cold 

water,  but  rapidly  in  boiling 

water,  and  very  vigorously 

with acids 

Beryllium Be 

Be

2+

 



react with acids and steam 

Aluminium Al 

Al

3+

 



Titanium Ti 

Ti

4+



 

reacts 


with 

concentrated 

mineral acids 

pyrometallu

rgical 

extraction 



using 

magnesium, 

or 

less 


commonly 

467 

other  alkali 

metals, 

hydrogen or 

calcium  in 

the 


Kroll 

process 


Manganese Mn 

Mn

2+



 

react  with  acids.  Very  poor 

reaction with steam. 

smelting 

with coke 

Zinc Zn 


Zn

2+

 



Chromium Cr 

Cr

3+



 

aluminother

mic 

reaction 



Iron Fe 

Fe

2+



 

smelting 

with coke 

Cadmium Cd 

Cd

2+

 



Cobalt Co 

Co

2+



 

Nickel Ni 

Ni

2+

 



Tin Sn 

Sn

2+



 

Lead Pb 


Pb

2+

 



Antimony Sb 

Sb

3+



 

may  react  with  some  strong 

oxidizing acids 

heat 


or 

physical 

extraction 

Bismuth Bi 

Bi

3+

 



Copper Cu 

Cu

2+



 

Tungsten W 

W

3+

 



Mercury Hg 

Hg

2+



 

Silver Ag 

Ag

+

 



Osmium Os 

Os

+



 

Palladium Pd 

Pd

2+

 



Gold Au/Platinum Pt  Au

3+

/Pt



4+[4][5]

 

Going from the bottom to the top of the table the metals: 



-

 

increase in reactivity; 



-

 

lose electrons (oxidize) more readily to form positive ions; 



-

 

corrode or tarnish more readily; 



-

 

require more energy (and different methods) to be separated from their ores; 



-

 

become stronger reducing agents (electron donors). 



Defining reactions[edit] 

There is no unique and fully consistent way to define the reactivity series, but it 

is  common  to  use  the  three  types  of  reaction  listed  below,  many  of  which  can  be 

performed in a high-school laboratory (at least as demonstrations).

[4] 

Reaction with water and acids[edit] 



The most reactive metals, such as sodium, will react with cold water to produce 

468 

hydrogen and the metal hydroxide: 

2 Na (s) + 2 H

2

O (l) 



→2 NaOH (aq) + H

2

 (g) 



Metals in the middle of the reactivity series, such as iron, will react with acids 

such as sulfuric acid (but not water at normal temperatures) to give hydrogen and a 

metal salt, such as iron(II) sulfate: 

An iron nail placed in a solution of copper sulfate will quickly change colour as 

metallic copper is deposited and the iron is converted into iron(II) sulfate: 

Fe (s) + CuSO

4

 (aq) 


→ Cu (s) + FeSO

4

 (aq) 



Similarly,  magnesium  can  be  used  to  extract  titanium  from  titanium 

tetrachloride, forming magnesium chloride in the process: 

2 Mg (s) + TiCl

4

 (l) 



→ Ti (s) + 2 MgCl

2

 (s) 



However,  other  factors  can  come  into  play,  such  as  in  the  preparation  of 

metallic  potassium  by  the  reduction  of  potassium  chloride  with  sodium  at  850  °C. 

Although  sodium  is  lower  than  potassium  in  the  reactivity  series,  the  reaction  can 

proceed because potassium is more volatile, and is distilled off from the mixture. 

Na (g) + KCl (l) 

→ K (g) + NaCl (l) 

Comparison with standard electrode potentials[edit] 

The reactivity series is sometimes quoted in the strict reverse order of standard 

electrode potentials, when it is also known as the "electrochemical series": 

Li > K > Sr > Na > Ca > Mg > Al > Mn > Zn > Cr(+3) > Fe > Cd > Co > Ni > 

Sn > Pb > H > Cu > Hg > Ag > Pd > Ir > Pt > Au 

The  positions  of  lithium  and  sodium  are  changed  on  such  a  series;  gold  and 

platinum  are  in  joint  position  and  not  gold  leading,  although  this  has  little  practical 

significance as both metals are highly unreactive. 

Standard  electrode  potentials  offer  a  quantitative  measure  of  the  power  of  a 

reducing  agent,  rather  than  the  qualitative  considerations  of  other  reactive  series. 

However, they are only valid for standard conditions: in particular, they only apply to 

reactions  in  aqueous  solution.  Even  with  this  proviso,  the  electrode  potentials  of 

lithium and sodium – and hence their positions in the electrochemical series – appear 

anomalous. The order of reactivity, as shown by the vigour of the reaction with water 

or the speed at which the metal surface tarnishes in air, appears to be 

potassium > sodium > lithium > alkaline earth metals, 

the  same  as  the  reverse  order  of  the  (gas-phase)  ionization  energies.  This  is 

borne  out  by  the  extraction  of  metallic  lithium  by  the  electrolysis  of  a  eutectic 

mixture  of  lithium  chloride  and  potassium  chloride:  lithium  metal  is  formed  at  the 

cathode, not potassium.

[6] 

In a reactivity series, the most reactive element is placed at the top and the least 



reactive element at the bottom. More reactive metals have a greater tendency to lose 

electrons and form positive ions. 

A reactivity series of metals could include any elements. For example: 


469 

 

A good way to remember the order of a reactivity series of metals is to use the 



first  letter  of  each  one  to  make  up  a  silly  sentence.  For  example:  People  Say  Little 

Children Make A Zebra Ill ConstantlySniffing Giraffes. 

Observations of the way  that  these  elements  react  with  water, acidsand steam 

enable us to put them into this series. 

The tables show how the elements react with water and dilute acids: 

Element 


Reaction with water 

Potassium 

Violently 

Sodium 


Very quickly 

Lithium 


Quickly 

Calcium 


More slowly 

Element 


Reaction with dilute acids 

Calcium 


Very quickly 

Magnesium 

Quickly 

Zinc 


More slowly 

Iron 


More slowly than zinc 

Copper 


Very slowly 

Silver 


Barely reacts 

Gold 


Does not react 

Note  that  aluminium  can  be  difficult  to  place  in  the  correct  position  in  the 

reactivity  series  during  these  experiments.  This  is  because  its  protective  aluminium 

oxide  layer  makes  it  appear  to  be  less  reactive  than  it  really  is.  When  this  layer  is 

removed, the observations are more reliable. 

Non-metals in the reactivity series 

It is useful to place carbon and hydrogen into the reactivity series because these 

elements can be used to extract metals. 



470 

Here is the reactivity series including carbon and hydrogen: 

 

Note that zinc and iron can be displaced from their oxides using carbon but not 



using hydrogen. However, copper can be extracted using carbon or hydrogen. 

 

Chemical reactions: exothermic and endothermic reactions 

 

We  have  explained  that  a  chemical  reaction  will  not  occur  until  substances 

(reactants) receive enough energy (activation energy) to break chemical bonds. This 

allows  atoms  to  redistribute  themselves  to  form  new  bonds  and  thus  form  new 

substances (products). The activation energy needs to be thought of as a barrier to be 

overcome. If the bonds between the reactants are strong, greater activation energy is 

required to initiate a chemical reaction; if the bonds are weak, less activation energy 

is required. 

 In the first stage of a chemical reaction, the enthalpy of the reactants increases 

through  some  form  of  energy  transfer.  Therefore,  the  total  energy  of  the  reactants 

increases by the amount of the activation energies. At this point, bonds are broken. In 

the next stage, new bonds are made in the formation of the products. The total energy 

of the products (i.e. the sum of the enthalpies) may be greater than, or less than, that 

of  the  reactants.  When  the  total  energy  of  the  products  is  less  than  that  of  the 

reactants, the chemical reaction is called an ‘exothermic reaction’, and when the total 

energy  of  the  products  is  more  than  that  of  the  reactants,  the  chemical  reaction  is 

called an ‘endothermic reaction’.  

To  be  consistent  with  the  law  of  conservation  of  energy,  in  an  exothermic 

reaction,  excess  energy  is  transferred  to  the  surrounding  materials  that  do  not  take 

part in the reaction (the surrounding environment): the environment heats up.  

In an endothermic reaction, energy is taken from the surrounding environment: 

the environment (the surrounding substance) cools down.  

The  different  types of  chemical  reaction  are  shown in  Figure  1.  Note  that  the 

total  energy  of  the  whole  system  (surrounding  environment–reactants–products) 

remains  constant  before  and  after  the  reaction,  whereas  this  is  not  true  for  the  total 

energies of the reactants compared to the products. 

Energy diagram for an exothermic reaction  


471 

 

Energy diagram for an endothermic reaction 



 

 

 A  good  example  of  an  endothermic  reaction  is  the  use  of  an  instant  icepack. 



Instant icepacks can be used to treat minor burns as well as sporting injuries, such as 

sprains.  A  typical  icepack  contains  the  ionic  compound  ammonium  nitrate  salt 

(NH

4

NO



3

), which reacts with water. In solution (the ionic solid dissolved in water), 

the ionic bonds are broken, freeing up ammonium ions (NH

4

+



 ) and nitrate ions (NO

3

 



  ).  During  the  reaction,  energy  is  taken  from  the  surrounding  environment  (for 

example, the ankle), thus cooling it down. The equation for the reaction is: 

NH

4



NO

3

 water NH



4

+

 + NO



3

 



 

Many  foods  we  eat  undergo  exothermic  reactions  and  literally  warm  us  up. 

Glucose (C

6

H



12

O

6



), a type of sugar found in many foods, reacts with oxygen (O

2

, in 



the air we breathe) to produce an exothermic reaction, with carbon dioxide (CO

2

) and 



water  (H

2

O)  as  the  products.  The  energy  given  off  assists  in  the  maintenance  of  a 



constant internal body temperature, which is important for many processes.  

The equation for the reaction is: 

C

6

H



12

O

6



 + 6O

2

 



→ 6CO

2

 + 6H



2

It is important to note that, in this reaction, the reactants involve more than two 



molecules.  Every  molecule  of  glucose  reacts  with  six  molecules  of  oxygen.  The 

reaction  produces  six  molecules  each  of  carbon  dioxide  and  water.  As  an  exercise, 

convince  yourself  of  the  law  of  conservation  of  atoms  by  determining  that  the  total 

number of each type of atom is the same on each side of the chemical equation. 



 

Reaction Rate 

472 

 

Chemical  reactions  vary  greatly  in  the  speed  at  which  they  occur.  Some  are 



essentially  instantaneous,  while  others  may  take  years  to  reach  equilibrium.  The 

Reaction  Rate  for  a  given  chemical  reaction  is  the  measure  of  the  change  in 

concentration of the reactants or the change in concentration of the products per unit 

time. 


Definition of reaction rate 

The  speed  of  a  chemical  reaction  may  be  defined  as  the  change  in 

concentration of a substance divided by the time interval during which this change is 

observed: 

 

For a reaction of the form A+B



→CA+B→C, the rate can be expressed in terms 

of the change in concentration of any of its components 

 

in which 



Δ[A] is the difference between the concentration of A over the time 

interval t

2

 – t



1

 



Notice the minus signs in the first two examples above. The concentration of a 

reactant  always  decreases  with  time,  so 

Δ[A]and  Δ[A]  are  both  negative.  Since 

negative  rates  do  not  make  much  sense,  rates  expressed  in  terms  of  a  reactant 

concentration  are  always  preceded  by  a  minus  sign  to  make  the  rate  come  out 

positive. 

Consider now a reaction in which the coefficients are different: 

A+3B


→2D 

It is clear that [B] decreases three times as rapidly as [A], so in order to avoid 

ambiguity when expressing the rate in terms of different components, it is customary 

to divide each change in concentration by the appropriate coefficient: 

 

Example 1 



For the oxidation of ammonia 

4NH3+3O2


→2N2+6H2O 

it was found that the rate of formation of N

2

 was 0.27 mol L



–1

 s

–1



a.

 



At what rate was water being formed? 

b.

 



At what rate was ammonia being consumed? 

SOLUTION 



a)  From  the  equation  stoichiometry, 

Δ[H


2

O]  =  6/2 

Δ[N

2

],  so  the  rate  of 



formation of H

2

O is 



3 × (0.27 mol L

–1

 s



–1

) = 0.81 mol L

–1

 s

–1



b) 4 moles of NH

3

 are consumed for every 2 moles of N



2

 formed, so the rate of 



473 

disappearance of ammonia is 

2 × (0.27 mol L

–1

 s



–1

) = 0.54 mol L

–1

 s

–1





Comment:  Because  of  the  way  this  question  is  formulated,  it  would  be 

acceptable to express this last value as a negative number. 

Instantaneous rates 

Most  reactions  slow  down  as  the  reactants  are  consumed.  Consequently,  the 

rates  given  by  the  expressions  shown  above  tend  to  lose  their  meaning  when 

measured over longer time intervals 

Δt. Note: Instantaneous rates are also known as 

differential rates. 

Thus  for  the  reaction  whose  progress  is  plotted  here,  the  actual  rate  (as 

measured  by  the  increasing  concentration  of  product)  varies  continuously,  being 

greatest at time zero. The instantaneous rate of a reaction is given by the slope of a 

tangent to the concentration-vs.-time curve. 

An instantaneous rate taken near the beginning of the reaction (t = 0) is known 

as an initial rate (label (1)here). As we shall soon see, initial rates play an important 

role  in  the  study  of  reaction  kinetics.  If  you  have  studied  differential  calculus,  you 

will  know  that  these  tangent  slopes  are  derivatives  whose  values  can  very  at  each 

point on the curve, so that these instantaneous rates are really limiting rates defined 

as 


 

If you do not know calculus, bear in mind that the larger the time interval 

Δt

the smallerwill be the precision of the instantaneous rate. 

Introduction 

During  the  course  of  the  reaction  shown  below,  reactants  A  and  B  are 

consumed while the concentration of product AB increases. The reaction rate can be 

determined by measuring how fast the concentration of A or B decreases, or by how 

fast the concentration of AB increases. 

A+B


⟶AB 

 

Figure  1.  The  above picture shows  a hypthetical  reaction  profile in  which  the 



reactants  (red)  decrease  in  concentration  as  the  products  increase  in  concetration 

(blue). 


For the stochiometrically complicated Reaction:  

 


474 

Looking at Figure 1 above, we can see that the rate can be measured in terms 

of either reactant (A or B) or either product (C or D). Not all variables are needed to 

solve for the rate. Therefore, if you have the value for "A" as well as the value for "a" 

you can solve for the reaction rate.  

You  can  also  notice  from  Formula  1  above  that,  the  change  in  reactants  over 

the change in time must have a negative sign in front of them. The reason for this is 

because the reactants are decreasing as a function of time, the rate would come out to 

be negative (because it is the reverse rate). Therefore, putting a negative sign in front 

of the variable will allow for the solution to be a positive rate. 



 

Rate Laws and Rate Constants 

 

A  rate  law  is  an  expression  which  relates  that  rate  of  a  reaction  to  the  rate 



constant  and  the  concentrations  of  the  reactants.  A  rate  constant,  kk,  is  a 

proportionality  constant  for  a  given  reaction.  The  general  rate  law  is  usually 

expressed as: 

Rate=k[A]

s

[B]


t

 

As  you  can  see  from  equation  2  above,  the  reaction  rate  is  dependent  on  the 



concentration  of  the  reactants  as  well  as  the  rate  constant.  However,  there  are  also 

other factors that can influence the rate of reaction. These factors include temperature 

and catalysts. When you are able to write a rate law equation for a certain reaction, 

you can determine the Reaction Order based on the values of s and t.  

Temperature Dependence 

Reaction Rate 

If  you  were  to  observe  a  chemical  reaction  to  occur  in  two  different  setting 

(one  at  a  higher  temperature  than  the  other),  you  would  most  likely  observe  the 

reaction occuring at a higher temperature to have a higher rate. This is because as you 

increase  the  temperature,  the  kinetic  energy  of  the  reactants  increase,  allowing  for 

more  collisions  between  the  molecules.  This,  therefore,  allows  for  products  to  be 

formed  faster.  A  simple rule of  thumb  that  can  be  used  is: for every  10°C  increase, 

the reaction rate doubles.  

However,  increasing  the  temperature  will  not  always  increase  the  rate  of  the 

reaction.  If  the  temperature  of  a  reaction  were  to  reach  a  certain  point  where  the 

reactant will begin to degrade, it will decrease the rate of the reaction. 

Rate Constant 

As  stated  in  the  note  above,  the  rate  constant,  k,  is  dependent  on  the 

temperature of which the reaction takes place. This can be seen through the Arrhenius 

Equation shown below: 

k=Ae

−Ea/RT


 

As  you  can  see  from  equation  3,  the  rate  constant  kk  is  dependent  on  the 

temperature  (in  Kelvins)  and  also  the  Activation  energy,  E

a

(in  joules)



"A"  in  the 

equation represents a pre-exponential factor that has the same units as k. Finally, R is 

the universal gas constant. 

 

Catalysts 


475 

 

Catalysts  are  a  class  of  molecules  which  lower  the  activation  energy  (E



a

required  for  reactants  to  collide  and  form  products.  They  are  not  consumed  in  the 



reaction  themselves,  therefore  they  are  only  there  to  basically  assist  the  reaction  is 

progressing forward. Thus, catalysts increase the rate of reaction. The most common 

type  of  catalyst  is  the  Enzyme  Catalyst.  In  chemical  reactions,  products  are  formed 

when  reactants  collide  with  one  another.  Enzymes  allow  for  reactants  to  collide  in 

perfect orienation making the reaction more effective in forming products.  

Reaction Order 

The  reaction  rate  for  a  given  reaction  is  a  crucial  tool  that  enables  us  to 

calculate the specific order of a reaction. The order of a reaction is important in that it 

enables us to classify specific chemical reactions easily and efficiently. Knowledge of 

the  reaction  order  quickly  allows  us  to  understand  numerous  factors  within  the 

reaction including the  rate law,  units of  the  rate  constant,  half  life,  and  much  more. 

Reaction order can be calculated from the rate law by adding the exponential values 

of the reactants in the rate law. It is important to note that although the reaction order 

can  be  determined  from  the  rate  law,  there  is  no  relationship  between  the  reaction 

order and the stoichiometric coefficients in the chemical equation. 

Example 1: 

Rate=k[A]

s

[B]



t

 

Reaction Order=s+t 



NOTE:  The  rate of  reaction  must  be  a  non-negative value. It can be zero  and 

does not need to be an integer.  

As shown in Formula 5, the complete reaction order is equal to the sum of "s" 

and  "t."  But  what  does  each  of  these  variables  by  themself  mean?  Each  variable 

represents the order of the reaction with respect to the reactant it is placed on. In this 

certain situation, s is the order of the reaction with respect to [A] and t is the order of 

the reaction with respect to [B].  

Here is an example of how you can look at this: If a reaction order with respect 

to  [A]  was  2  (s  =  2)  and  [B]  was  1  (t  =  1),  then  that  basically  means  that  the 

concentration of reactant A is decreasing by a factor of 2 and the concentration of [B] 

is decrease by a factor of 1.  

So if you have a reation order of Zero (s + t = 0), this basically means that the 

concentration of the reactants does not affect the rate of reaction. You could remove 

or add reactants to the mixture but the rate will not change.  

A list of the different reaction rate equations for zero-, first-, and second-order 

reactions can be seen in Table 1. This table also includes further equations that can be 

determine  by  this  equation  once  the  order  of  the  reaction  is  known  (Half  life, 

integrated rate law, etc.) 




1   ...   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал