Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет53/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   ...   70

Atomic number and atomic mass number 

The  chemical  properties  of  an  element  are  determined  by  the  charge  of  its 

nucleus, i.e. by the number of protons. This number is called the atomic number and 

is denoted by the letter Z. 

Definition: Atomic number (Z) 

The number of protons in an atom. 

The mass of an atom depends on how many nucleons its nucleus contains. The 

number of 

nucleons,  i.e.  the  total  number  of  protons  plus  neutrons,  is  called  the  atomic 

mass number 

and is denoted by the letter A. 

Definition: Atomic mass number (A) 

The number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. 

Standard notation shows the chemical symbol, the atomic mass number and the 

atomic number of an element as follows: 


456 

For  example,  the  iron  nucleus  which  has  26  protons  and  30  neutrons,  is 



denoted as 

 

where  the  total  nuclear  charge  is  Z  =  26  and  the  mass  number  A  =  56.  The 



number of neutrons is simply the difference N = A 

− Z. 


Important: 

Don’t confuse the notation we have used above, with the way this information 

appears 

on  the  Periodic  Table.  On  the  Periodic  Table,  the  atomic  number  usually 

appears in the 

top  lefthand  corner  of  the  block  or  immediately  above  the  element’s  symbol. 

The number 

below the element’s symbol is its relative atomic mass. This is not exactly the 

same as 

the atomic mass number. This will be explained in section 3.5. The example of 

iron is used again below. 

 

You will notice in the example of iron that the atomic mass number is more or 



less  the  same  as  its  atomic  mass.  Generally,  an  atom  that  contains  n  protons  and 

neutrons (i.e. Z = n), will have a mass approximately equal to n u. The reason is that a 

C-12 atom has 6 protons, 6 neutrons and 6 electrons, with the protons and neutrons 

having about the same mass and the electron mass being negligible in comparison. 



 

The division of lelectrons from an atom 

 

A  large  local  charge  separation  usually  results  when  a  shared  electron  pair  is 

donated unilaterally. The three Kekulé formulas shown here illustrate this condition. 

 

In  the  formula  for  ozone  the  central  oxygen  atom  has  three  bonds  and  a  full 



positive  charge  while  the  right  hand  oxygen  has  a  single  bond  and  is  negatively 

charged.  The  overall  charge  of  the  ozone  molecule  is  therefore  zero.  Similarly, 



457 

nitromethane  has  a  positive-charged  nitrogen  and  a  negative-charged  oxygen,  the 

total  molecular  charge  again  being  zero.  Finally,  azide  anion  has  two  negative-

charged  nitrogens  and  one  positive-charged  nitrogen,  the  total  charge  being  minus 

one. 

In  general,  for  covalently  bonded  atoms  having  valence  shell  electron  octets,  if  the 



number of covalent bonds to an atom is greater than its normal valence it will carry a 

positive  charge.  If  the  number  of  covalent  bonds  to  an  atom  is  less  than  its  normal 

valence  it  will  carry  a  negative  charge.  The  formal  charge  on  an  atom  may  also  be 

calculated by the following formula: 

 

 

Polar Covalent Bonds 

Because 


of 

their 


differing  nuclear  charges,  and 

as a result of shielding by inner 

electron  shells,  the  different 

atoms  of  the  periodic  table 

have  different  affinities  for 

nearby electrons. The ability of 

an  element  to  attract  or  hold 

onto 


electrons 

is 


called 

electronegativity.  

rough 


quantitative 

scale 


of 

electronegativity 

values  was  established  by 

Linus  Pauling,  and  some  of 

these  are  given  in  the  table  to  the  right.  A  larger  number  on  this  scale  signifies  a 

greater  affinity  for  electrons.  Fluorine  has  the  greatest  electronegativity  of  all  the 

elements, and the heavier alkali metals such as potassium, rubidium and cesium have 

the lowest electronegativities. It should be noted that carbon is about in the middle of 

the  electronegativity  range,  and  is  slightly  more  electronegative  than  hydrogen. 

When two different atoms are bonded covalently, the shared electrons are attracted to 

the  more  electronegative  atom  of  the  bond,  resulting  in  a  shift  of  electron  density 

toward the more electronegative atom. Such a covalent bond is polar, and will have a 

dipole (one end is positive and the other end negative). The degree of polarity and the 

magnitude  of  the  bond  dipole  will  be  proportional  to  the  difference  in 

electronegativity  of  the  bonded  atoms.  Thus  a  O–H  bond  is  more  polar  than  a  C–H 

bond,  with the  hydrogen  atom  of  the  former  being  more  positive than the  hydrogen 

bonded to carbon. Likewise, C–Cl and C–Li bonds are both polar, but the carbon end 

is positive in the former and negative in the latter. The dipolar nature of these bonds 

is often indicated by  a  partial  charge  notation  (

δ+/–) or by an arrow pointing to the 

negative end of the bond. 

H 

2.20 


Electronegativity 

Values 

for Some Elements 

Li 

0.98 


Be 

1.57 


B 

2.04 


C 

2.55 


N 

3.04 


O 

3.44 


F 

3.98 


Na 

0.90 


Mg 

1.31 


Al 

1.61 


Si 

1.90 


P 

2.19 


S 

2.58 


Cl 

3.16 


K 

0.82 


Ca 

1.00 


Ga 

1.81 


Ge 

2.01 


As 

2.18 


Se 

2.55 


Br 

2.96 


 

458 

 

Although  there  is  a  small  electronegativity  difference  between  carbon  and 



hydrogen,  the  C–H  bond  is  regarded  as  weakly  polar  at  best,  and  hydrocarbons  in 

general are considered to be non-polar compounds. 

The  shift  of  electron  density  in  a  covalent  bond  toward  the  more 

electronegative  atom  or  group  can  be  observed  in  several  ways.  For  bonds  to 

hydrogen, acidity is one criterion. If the bonding electron pair moves away from the 

hydrogen nucleus the proton will be more easily transfered to a base (it will be more 

acidic).  A  comparison  of  the  acidities  of  methane,  water  and  hydrofluoric  acid  is 

instructive.  Methane  is  essentially  non-acidic,  since  the  C–H  bond  is  nearly  non-

polar. As noted above, the O–H bond of water is polar, and it is at least 25 powers of 

ten more acidic than methane. H–F is over 12 powers of ten more acidic than water as 

a  consequence  of  the  greater  electronegativity  difference  in  its  atoms. 

Electronegativity differences may be transmitted through connecting covalent bonds 

by  an  inductive  effect.  Replacing  one  of  the  hydrogens  of  water  by  a  more 

electronegative  atom  increases  the  acidity  of  the  remaining  O–H  bond.  Thus 

hydrogen  peroxide,  HO–O–H,  is  ten  thousand  times  more  acidic  than  water,  and 

hypochlorous acid, Cl–O–H is one hundred million times more acidic. This inductive 

transfer of polarity tapers off as the number of transmitting bonds increases, and the 

presence of  more  than one highly  electronegative  atom  has a  cumulative  effect.  For 

example,  trifluoro  ethanol,  CF

3

CH



2

–O–H  is  about  ten  thousand  times  more  acidic 

than ethanol, CH

3

CH



2

–O–H. 


 

Classification of Chemical Bond Types 

 

chemical bond represents the net attraction that keeps atoms near each other 



in  most  material  samples.  It  is  a  consequence  of  the  electrical  attraction  between 

oppositely charged particles in atoms--namely electrons and protons. 

Because there exists a large number and a diverse arrangement of electrons and 

protons  in  the  various  atoms  of  most  substances,  a  precise  understanding  of  all  the 

complex electrical interactions can be challenging. However, some simplified models 

of these interactions allow us to predict many important properties.  

First,  we  divide  bonds  up  into  two  major  categories:  primary  bonds  and 

secondary  bonds.  Primary  bonds  are  the  strong  bonds  between  the  tightly  clustered 

atoms  that  give  any  pure  substance  its  characteristic  properties.  Secondary  bonds 

(also  known  as  interparticle,  intermolecular,  or  Van  der  Waals  attractions)  are  the 

relatively weaker attractions between nearby atoms or molecules that are important in 

most liquids (especially liquid mixtures) and some solids. 


459 

 

Primary  Bond  Types:  There  are  3  major  types  of  primary  bonds--ionic



covalent,  and  metallic--which  reflect  the  3  different  ways  that  you  can  combine  the 

two major types of elements,metals and nonmetals.  

Remember  that  metals  are  elements  that  have  a  relatively  weak  attraction  for 

their  outermost  electrons,  while  nonmetals  are  elements  with  a  strong  attraction  for 

these electrons. As you move to the left and down on the Periodic Table, elements get 

'more  metallic';  as  you  move  to  the  right  and  up,  elements  get  'more  nonmetallic'.  

 

Bond Type 



Elements 

Example 


Ionic 

Metal + Nonmetal 

NaCl (table salt) 

Covalent 

Nonmetal + Nonmetal 

H

2



O (water) 

Metallic 

Metal + Metal 

Fe (iron) 

 

Ionic: Metal + Nonmetal 



Electrons  are  transferred  from  the  metal  to  the  nonmetal,  creating  positively 

charged cations and negatively charged anions

Ionic materials are usually brittle solids at room temperature, and they exist as 

highly-ordered  3-dimensional  arrangements  of  vast  numbers  of  ions.  The  exact 

proportions  of  the  different  types  of  ions  are  given  by  the  compound's  chemical 

formula, and reflect a balance of total positive and negative charges. 

Most geological minerals are ionic compounds. 

 

Covalent: Nonmetal + Nonmetal 



Electrons  are  shared  between  pairs  of  nonmetal  atoms,  each  of  which  has  a 

relatively strong attraction for those electrons. 



460 

Covalently bonded materials come in 2 major types--molecular substances and 



covalent network solids (or covalent crystals).  

Molecular substances: Most covalent substances exist as molecules, which are 

small  to  medium-sized  groups  of  atoms  connected  by  covalent  bonds.  Because  a 

molecule  is  attracted  to  other  molecules  in  the  sample  by  weaker  secondary  bonds, 

most molecular substances exist as gases or liquids at room temperature. The nature 

of the attraction between molecules depends a great deal on the way that the atoms in 

the molecule are arranged (i.e., on the molecular shape). 

Since  the  strength  of  secondary  bonds  tends  to  go  up  with  molecular  size, 

larger  molecules  can  exist  as  solids,  but  they  usually  have  low  melting  points  and 

poor  mechanical  strength.  Waxes,  polymers  (plastics),  and  many  biological  tissues 

are all familiar examples of large molecular substances. 

 

Covalent  crystals  are  an  extreme  example  of  a  large  molecule--they  are 

highly-ordered  3-dimensional  arrangements  of  trillions  of  trillions  of  atoms 

connected  by  covalent  bonds.  These  materials  have  high  melting  points  and  good 

mechanical  strength.  The  most  familiar  examples  are  diamond  and  graphite,  both 

composed  of  purely  carbon  atoms  (just  connected  in  slightly  different  geometries). 

Other  examples  include  silicon,  quartz  (silicon  dioxide),  and  silicon  carbide; 

however,  because  silicon  is  actually  a  metalloidrather  than  a  nonmetal,  these  latter 

materials are entering the "grey area" between the different material and bond types. 

 

 



Metallic: Metal + Metal 

The valence electrons are easily dislodged from all of the atoms in the sample, 

and behave as a "sea of fluid electrons" surrounding positively charged metal cores. 

Most  metals  are  solids  at  room  temperature,  and  they  exist  as  highly-ordered  3-

dimensional  arrangements  of  vast  numbers  of  atoms  (i.e.,  as  metallic  crystals).  The 

strength  of  metallic  bonding  varies  significantly  between  different  metal  elements, 



461 

and  therefore  melting  points  and  mechanical  strength  also  vary.  Since  the  valence 

electrons  are  held  loosely  in  all  metallic  solids,  they  are  good  conductors  of 

electricity and heat, and they can be bent or shaped without breaking. 

 

 

 The Periodic Law and periodic system 

 

The  periodic  law  was  developed  independently  by  Dmitri  Mendeleev  and 



Lothar  Meyer  in  1869.  Mendeleev  created  the  first  periodic  table  and  was  shortly 

followed by Meyer. They both arranged the elements by their mass and proposed that 

certain  properties  periodically  reoccur.  Meyer  formed  his periodic law  based  on  the 

atomic volume or molar volume, which is the atomic mass divided by the density in 

solid  form.  Mendeleev's  table  is  noteworthy  because  it  exhibits  mostly  accurate 

values for atomic mass and it also contains blank spaces for unknown elements. 

Introduction 

In  1804  physicist  John  Dalton  advanced  the  atomic  theory  of  matter,  helping 

scientists  determine  the  mass  of  the  known  elements.  Around  the  same  time,  two 

chemists Sir Humphry Davy and Michael Faraday developed electrochemistry which 

aided  in  the  discovery  of  new  elements.  By  1829,  chemist  Johann  Wolfgang 

Doberiner  observed  that  certain  elements  with  similar  properties  occur  in  group  of 

three  such  as;  chlorine,  bromine,  iodine;  calcium,  strontium,  and  barium;  sulfur, 

selenium, tellurium; iron, cobalt, manganese. However, at the time of this discovery 

too  few  elements  had  been  discovered  and  there  was  confusion  between  molecular 

weight  and  atomic  weights;  therefore,  chemists  never  really  understood  the 

significance of Doberiner's triad. 

In  1859  two  physicists  Robert  Willhem  Bunsen  and  Gustav  Robert  Kirchoff 

discovered  spectroscopy  which  allowed  for  discovery  of  many  new  elements.  This 

gave scientists the tools to reveal the relationships between elements. Thus in 1864, 

chemist John  A.  R  Newland  arranged the elements in  increasing  of  atomic  weights. 

Explaining that a given set of properties reoccurs every eight place, he named it the 

law of Octaves. 

The Periodic Law  

In 1869, Dmitri Mendeleev and Lothar Meyer individually came up with their 

own  periodic  law  "when  the  elements  are  arranged  in  order  of  increasing  atomic 

mass,  certain  sets  of  properties  recur  periodically."  Meyer  based  his  laws  on  the 

atomic  volume  (the  atomic  mass  of  an  element  divided  by  the  density  of  its  solid 

form), this property is called Molar volume. 


462 

 

Mendeleev's Periodic Table 



In 1869, Mendeleev classified the then known 56 elements on the basis of their 

physical and chemical properties in the increasing order of the atomic masses, in the 

form of a table. Mendeleev had observed that properties of the elements orderly recur 

in a cyclic fashion. He found that the elements with similar properties recur at regular 

intervals  when  the  elements  are  arranged  in  the  order  of  their  increasing  atomic 

masses. He concluded that 'the physical and chemical properties of the elements are 

periodic  functions  of  their  atomic  masses'.  This  came  to  be  known  as  the  law  of 

chemical periodicity and stated: 



 

Based on this law all the known elements were arranged in the form of a table 

called  the  'Periodic  Table'.  Elements  with  similar  properties  recurred  at  regular 

intervals  and  fell  in  certain  groups  or  families.  The  elements  in  each  group  were 

similar  to  each  other  in  many  properties.  The  elements  with  dissimilar  properties 

from  one  another  were  separated.  Mendeleev's  periodic  table  contains  eight  vertical 

columns of elements called 'groups' and seven horizontal rows called 'periods', Each 

group  has  two  sub-groups  A  and  B.  The  properties  of  elements  of  a  sub-group 

resemble each other more markedly than the properties of those between the elements 

of the two sub-groups. 

Mendeleev's periodic table is an arrangement of the elements that group similar 

elements  together.  He  left  blank  spaces  for  the  undiscovered  elements  (atomic 

masses, element: 44, scandium; 68, gallium; 72, germanium; & 100, technetium) so 

that  certain  elements  can  be  grouped  together.  However,  Mendeleev  had  not 

predicted the noble gases, so no spots were left for them. 


463 

 

 



In  Mendeleev's  table,  elements  with  similar  characteristics  fall  in  vertical 

columns, called groups. Molar volume increases from top to bottom of a group

3

 

 



Example 

 

The  alkali  metals  (Mendeleev's  group  I)  have  high  molar  volumes  and  they 

also have low melting points which decrease in the order: 

  

Li (174 



o

C) > Na (97.8 

o

C) > K (63.7 



o

C) > Rb (38.9 

o

C) > Cs (28.5 



o

C) 


 

Atomic Number as the Basis for the Periodic Law 

Assuming  there  were  errors  in  atomic  masses,  Mendeleev  placed  certain 

elements not in order of increasing atomic mass so that they could fit into the proper 

groups (similar elements have similar properties) of his periodic table. An example of 

this was with argon (atomic mass 39.9), which was put in front of potassium (atomic 

mass  39.1).  Elements  were  placed  into  groups  that  expressed  similar  chemical 

behavior. 

In 1913 Henry G.J. Moseley did researched the X-Ray spectra of the elements 

and suggested that the energies of electron orbitals depend on the nuclear charge and 

the nuclear charges of atoms in the target, which is also known as anode, dictate the 

frequencies  of  emitted  X-Rays.  Moseley  was  able  to  tie  the  X-Ray  frequencies  to 

numbers  equal  to  the  nuclear  charges,  therefore  showing  the  placement  of  the 

elements in Mendeleev's periodic table. The equation he used: 

ν=A(Z−b)2ν=A(Z−b)2 

with 


-

 

νν: X-Ray frequency 



-

 

ZZ: Atomic Number 



-

 

AA and bb: constants  



 

464 

Atomic numbers, not weights, determine the factor of chemical properties. As 

mentioned  before,  argon  weights  more  than  potassium  (39.9  vs.  39.1,  respectively), 

yet argon is in front of potassium. Thus, we can see that elements are arranged based 

on their atomic number. The periodic law is found to help determine many patterns of 

many different properties of elements; melting and boiling points, densities, electrical 

conductivity, reactivity, acidic, basic, valance, polarity, and solubility. 

The table below shows that elements increase from left to right accordingly to 

their atomic number. The vertical columns have similar properties within their group 

for example Lithium is similar to sodium, beryllium is similar to magnesium, and so 

on. 

 

So, elements in Group 1 (periodic table) have similar chemical properties, they 



are called alkali metals. Elements in Group 2 have similar chemical properties, they 

are called the alkaline earth metals. 

Short form periodic table 

The short form periodic table is a table where elements are arranged in 7 rows, 

periods,  with  increasing  atomic  numbers  from  left  to  right.  There  are  18  vertical 

columns known as groups. This table is based on Mendeleev's periodic table and the 

periodic law. 

Long form Periodic Table 

In the long form, each period correlates to the building up of electronic shell; 

the first two groups (1-2) (s-block) and the last 6 groups (13-18) (p-block) make up 

the  main-group  elements  and  the  groups  (3-12)  in  between  the  s  and  p  blocks  are 

called the transition metals. Group 18 elements are called noble gases, and group 17 

are called halogens. The f-block elements, called inner transition metals, which are at 

the  bottom  of  the  periodic  table  (periods  8  and  9);  the  15  elements  after  barium 

(atomic number 56) are called lanthanides and the 14 elements after radium (atomic 

number 88) are called actinides. 



 

Law of Conservation of Mass 

 

The Law of Conservation of Mass is that, in a closed system, matter cannot be 



created or destroyed. It can change forms, but is conserved. 

The  Law  of  Conservation  of  Mass  is  a  relation  stating  that  in  a  chemical 

reaction, the mass of the products equals the mass of the reactants. Antoine Lavoisier 


465 

stated, "atoms of an object cannot be created or destroyed, but can be moved around 

and be changed into different particles". 

The  principle  of  conservation  of  mass  was  first  outlined  by  Mikhail 

Lomonosov  (1711–1765)  in  1748.  He  proved  it  by  experiments—though  this  is 

sometimes challenged.

[9]

Antoine Lavoisier (1743–1794) had expressed these ideas in 



1774.  Others  whose  ideas  pre-dated  the  work  of  Lavoisier  include  Joseph  Black 

(1728–1799), Henry Cavendish(1731–1810), and Jean Rey (1583–1645).

[10]

 

The conservation of mass was obscure for  millennia because of the buoyancy 



effect of the Earth's atmosphere on the weight of gases. For example, a piece of wood 

weighs less after burning; this seemed to suggest that some of its mass disappears, or 

is  transformed  or  lost.  This  was  not  disproved  until  careful  experiments  were 

performed in which chemical reactions such as rusting were allowed to take place in 

sealed  glass  ampoules;  it  was  found  that  the  chemical  reaction  did  not  change  the 

weight  of  the  sealed  container  and  its  contents.  The  vacuum  pump  also  enabled  the 

weighing of gases using scales. 

Once  understood,  the  conservation  of  mass  was  of  great  importance  in 

progressing  from  alchemy  to  modern  chemistry.  Once  early  chemists  realized  that 

chemical  substances  never  disappeared  but  were  only  transformed  into  other 

substances  with  the  same  weight, these  scientists  could  for  the  first time  embark  on 

quantitative  studies  of  the  transformations  of  substances.  The  idea  of  mass 

conservation  plus  a  surmise  that  certain  "elemental  substances"  also  could  not  be 

transformed  into  others  by  chemical  reactions,  in  turn  led  to  an  understanding  of 

chemical elements, as well as the idea that all chemical processes and transformations 

(such as burning and metabolic reactions) are reactions between invariant amounts or 

weights of these chemical elements. 

Following  the  pioneering  work  of  Lavoisier  the  prolonged  and  exhaustive 

experiments  of  Jean  Stas  supported  the  strict  accuracy  of  this  law  in  chemical 

reactions,

[11]

  even  though  they  were  carried  out  with  other  intentions.  His 



research

[12][13]


 indicated that in certain reactions the loss or gain could not have been 

more than from 2 to 4 parts in 100,000.

[14]

The difference in the accuracy aimed at and 



attained  by  Lavoisier  on  the  one  hand,  and  by  Morley  and  Stas  on  the  other,  is 

enormous.

  

-

 



What is the Law of Conservation of Mass?

 

-



 

When elements and compounds react to form new products, mass cannot be 

lost or gained.

 

-



 

"The  Law  of  Conservation  of  Mass"  definition  states  that  "mass  cannot  be 

created or destroyed, but changed into different forms".

 

-



 

So,  in  a  chemical  change,  the  total  mass  of  reactants  must  equal  the  total 

mass of products.

 

-



 

The law of conservation of mass can also be stated "no atoms can be lost or 

made in a chemical reaction", which is why the total mass of products must equal the 

total mass of reactants you started with.

 

-

 



By  using  this  law,  together  with  atomic  and  formula  masses,  you  can 

calculate  the  quantities  of  reactants  and  products  involved  in  a  reaction  and  the 

simplest formula of a compound

 


466 

-

 



One  consequence  of  the  law  of  conservation  of  mass  is  that  In  a  balanced 

chemical  symbol  equation,  the  total  of  relative  formula  masses  of  the  reactants  is 

equal to the total relative formula masses of the products.

 

2.3 reactivity series of metals. 



In chemistry, a reactivity series (or activity series) is an empirical, calculated, 

and  structurally  analytical  progression  of  a  series  of  metals,  arranged  by  their 

"reactivity"  from  highest  to  lowest.

[1][2][3]

  It  is  used  to  summarize  information  about 

the  reactions of  metals  with  acids  and  water,  double  displacement  reactions  and  the 

extraction of metals from their ores. 

Table 



1   ...   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал