Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет50/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   ...   70

Example  of  a  complex  reaction:  Reaction  of  hydrogen  and  nitric 

oxide[edit] 

For the reaction 

2  H

2

(g)  +  2  NO(g) 



→  N

2

(g)  +  2  H



2

O(g)  the  observed  rate  equation  (or  rate 

expression) is: 

 

As  for  many  reactions,  the  experimental  rate  equation does  not  simply  reflect 



the  stoichiometric  coefficients  in  the  overall  reaction:  It  is  third  order  overall:  first 

order  in  H

2

  and  second  order  in  NO,  even  though  the  stoichiometric  coefficients  of 



both reactants are equal to 2.

[2]


 

In  chemical  kinetics,  the  overall  reaction  rate  is  often  explained  using  a 

mechanism consisting of a number of elementary steps. Not all of these steps affect 

the  rate of  reaction; normally  the slowest  elementary  step  controls the  reaction rate. 

For this example, a possible mechanism is: 

1.

 



2 NO(g) 

⇌ N


2

O

2



(g) (fast equilibrium) 

2.

 



N

2

O



2

 + H


2

 

→ N



2

O + H


2

O (slow) 

3.

 

N



2

O + H


2

 

→ N



2

 + H


2

O (fast) 

Reactions 1 and 3 are very rapid compared to the second, so the slow reaction 2 

is the rate determining step. This is a bimolecular elementary reaction whose rate is 

given by the second order equation: 

where k

2

 is the rate constant for the second step. 



However N

2

O



2

 is an unstable intermediate whose concentration is determined 

by the fact that the first step is in equilibrium, so that [N

2

O



2

] = K

1

[NO]


2

, where K

1

 is 


the equilibrium constant of the first step. Substitution of this equation in the previous 

equation leads to a rate equation expressed in terms of the original reactants 

This agrees with the form of the observed rate equation if it is assumed that k = 

k

2

K

1

.  In  practice  the  rate  equation  is  used  to  suggest  possible  mechanisms  which 



predict a rate equation in agreement with experiment. 

The  second  molecule  of  H

2

  does  not  appear  in  the  rate  equation  because  it 



reacts in the third step, which is a rapid step after the rate-determining step, so that it 

does not affect the overall reaction rate. 

Temperature dependence 

Main article: Arrhenius equation 

Each reaction rate coefficient k has a temperature dependency, which is usually 

given by the Arrhenius equation: 


433 

E

a

 is the activation energy and R is the gas constant. Since at temperature T the 



molecules  have  energies  given  by  a  Boltzmann  distribution,  one  can  expect  the 

number of collisions with energy greater than E



a

 to be proportional to e

E

a



RT

A is the 

pre-exponential factor or frequency factor. 

The  values  for  A  and  E

a

  are  dependent  on  the  reaction.  There  are  also  more 



complex  equations  possible,  which  describe  temperature  dependence  of  other  rate 

constants that do not follow this pattern. 

A  chemical  reaction  takes  place  only  when  the  reacting  particles  collide. 

However, not all collisions are effective in causing the reaction. Products are formed 

only when the colliding particles possess a certain minimum energy called threshold 

energy.  As  a  rule  of  thumb,  reaction  rates  for  many  reactions  double  for  every  10 

degrees  Celsius  increase  in  temperature,

[3]


  For  a  given  reaction,  the  ratio  of  its  rate 

constant at a higher temperature to its rate constant at a lower temperature is known 

as its temperature coefficient (Q).Q

10

 is commonly used as the ratio of rate constants 



that are 10 °C apart. 

Pressure dependence 

The  pressure  dependence  of  the  rate  constant  for  condensed-phase  reactions 

(i.e., when reactants and products are solids or liquid) is usually sufficiently weak in 

the  range  of  pressures  normally  encountered  in  industry  that  it  is  neglected  in 

practice. 

The pressure dependence of the rate constant is associated with the activation 

volume. For the reaction proceeding through an activation-state complex: 

A + B 

⇌ |A⋯B|


 

→ P 



the activation volume, 

ΔV

, is: 


where 

 denotes the partial molar volumes of the reactants and products and ‡ 

indicates the activation-state complex. 

For the above reaction, one can expect the change of the reaction rate constant 

(based  either  on  mole-fraction  or  on  molar-concentration)  with  pressure  at  constant 

temperature to be: 

In  practice,  the  matter  can  be  complicated  because  the  partial  molar  volumes 

and the activation volume can themselves be a function of pressure. 

Reactions can increase or decrease their rates with pressure, depending on the 

value of 

ΔV

. As an example of the possible magnitude of the pressure effect, some 



organic  reactions  were  shown  to  double  the  reaction  rate  when  the  pressure  was 

increased  from  atmospheric  (0.1  MPa)  to  50  MPa  (which  gives 

ΔV

  = 



−0.025 

L/mol).[10]

 

 

chemical equation  



chemical equation is the symbolic representation of a chemical reaction in 

the form of symbols and formulae, wherein the reactant entities are given on the left-

hand  side  and  the  product  entities  on  the  right-hand  side.

[1]


  The  coefficients  next  to 

the  symbols  and  formulae  of  entities  are  the  absolute  values  of  the  stoichiometric 

numbers. The first chemical equation was diagrammed by Jean Beguin in 1615.

[2]


 

A  chemical  equation  consists  of  the  chemical  formulas  of  the  reactants  (the 

starting substances) and the chemical formula of the products (substances formed in 


434 

the chemical reaction). The two are separated by an arrow symbol (

, usually read 

as  "yields")  and  each  individual  substance's  chemical  formula  is  separated  from 

others by a plus sign. 

As an example, the equation for the reaction of hydrochloric acid with sodium 

can be denoted: 

2 HCl + 2 Na 

→ 2 NaCl + H 

This equation would be read as "two HCl plus two Na yields two NaCl and H 



two." But, for equations involving complex chemicals, rather than reading the letter 

and its subscript, the chemical formulas are read using IUPAC nomenclature. Using 

IUPAC nomenclature, this equation would be read as "hydrochloric acid plus sodium 

yields sodium chloride andhydrogen gas." 

This equation indicates that sodium and HCl react to form NaCl and H

2

. It also 



indicates  that  two  sodium  molecules  are  required  for  every  two  hydrochloric  acid 

molecules  and  the  reaction  will  form  two  sodium  chloride  molecules  and  one 

diatomic molecule of hydrogen gas molecule for every two hydrochloric acid and two 

sodium molecules that react. Thestoichiometric coefficients (the numbers in front of 

the  chemical  formulas)  result  from  the  law  of  conservation  of  mass  and  the  law  of 

conservation of charge  (see  "Balancing  Chemical  Equation"  section below for  more 

information). 

Common symbols[edit] 

Symbols  are  used  to  differentiate  between  different  types  of  reactions.  To 

denote the type of reaction:

[1]

 



 

"=" symbol is used to denote a stoichiometric relation. 

 

"



→" symbol is used to denote a net forward reaction. 

 



"

" symbol is used to denote a reaction in both directions. 

 

"



" symbol is used to denote an equilibrium. 

The  physical  state  of  chemicals  is  also  very  commonly  stated  in  parentheses 

after the chemical symbol, especially for ionic reactions. When stating physical state, 

(s) denotes a solid, (l) denotes a liquid, (g) denotes a gas and (aq) denotes an aqueous 

solution. 

If the reaction requires energy, it is indicated above the arrow. A capital Greek 

letter delta ( ) is put on the reaction arrow to show that energy in the form of heat is 

added  to  the  reaction. 

  is  used  if  the  energy  is  added  in  the  form  of  light.  Other 

symbols are used for other specific types of energy or radiation. 

Balancing chemical equations 


435 

 

As seen from the equation CH 



4 + 2 O 

→ CO 



2 + 2 H 

2O,  a  coefficient  of  2  must  be  placed  before  the  oxygen  gas  on  the  reactants 

side  and  before  the  water  on  the  products  side  in  order  for,  as  per  the  law  of 

conservation  of  mass,  the  quantity  of  each  element  does  not  change  during  the 

reaction 

 

P



4

O

10



 + 6 H

2



→ 4 H

3

PO



4

 

This chemical equation is being balanced by first multiplying H



3

PO

4



 by four to 

match the number of P atoms, and then multiplying H

2

O by six to match the numbers 



of H and O atoms. 

The law of conservation of mass dictates that the quantity of each element does 

not  change  in  a  chemical  reaction.  Thus,  each  side  of  the  chemical  equation  must 

represent  the  same  quantity  of  any  particular  element.  Likewise,  the  charge  is 

conserved in a chemical reaction. Therefore, the same charge must be present on both 

sides of the balanced equation. 

One  balances  a  chemical  equation  by  changing  the  scalar  number  for  each 

chemical formula. Simple chemical equations can be balanced by inspection, that is, 

by trial and error. Another technique involves solving a system of linear equations. 

Balanced  equations  are  written  with  smallest  whole-number  coefficients.  If 

there is no coefficient before a chemical formula, the coefficient 1 is understood. 

The method of inspection can be outlined as putting a coefficient of 1 in front 

of  the  most  complex  chemical  formula  and  putting  the  other  coefficients  before 

everything  else  such  that  both  sides  of  the  arrows  have  the  same  number  of  each 

atom. If any fractional coefficient exists, multiply every coefficient with the smallest 

number  required  to  make  them  whole,  typically  the  denominator  of  the  fractional 

coefficient for a reaction with a single fractional coefficient. 

As  an  example,  seen  in  the  above  image,  the  burning  of  methane  would  be 

balanced by putting a coefficient of 1 before the CH

4



1 CH

4

 + O



2

 

→ CO



2

 + H


2

Since there is one carbon on each side of the arrow, the first atom (carbon) is 



436 

balanced. 

Looking at the next atom (hydrogen), the right-hand side has two atoms, while 

the  left-hand  side  has  four.  To  balance  the  hydrogens,  2  goes  in  front  of  the  H

2

O, 


which yields: 

1 CH


4

 + O


2

 

→ CO



2

 + 2 H


2

Inspection of the last atom to be balanced (oxygen) shows that the right-hand 



side has four atoms, while the left-hand side has two. It can be balanced by putting a 

2 before O

2

, giving the balanced equation: 



CH

4

 + 2 O



2

 

→ CO



2

 + 2 H


2

This equation does not have any coefficients in front of CH



4

 and CO


2

, since a 

coefficient of 1 is dropped. 

Ionic equations 

An  ionic  equation  is  a  chemical  equation  in  which  electrolytes  are  written  as 

dissociated  ions.  Ionic  equations  are  used  for  single  and  double  displacement 

reactions that occur inaqueous solutions. For example, in the following precipitation 

reaction: 

 

the full ionic equation is: 



 

In this reaction, the Ca

2+

 and the NO



3

 ions remain in solution and are not part 



of the reaction. That is, these ions are identical on both the reactant and product side 

of  the  chemical  equation.  Because  such  ions  do  not  participate  in  the  reaction,  they 

are  called spectator ions.  A  net ionic  equation  is the  full  ionic  equation from  which 

the  spectator  ions  have  been  removed.  The  net  ionic  equation  of  the  proceeding 

reactions is: 

 

or, in reduced balanced form, 



 

In a neutralization or acid/base reaction, the net ionic equation will usually be: 

H

+

(aq) + OH



(aq) 


→ H

2

O(l) 



There are a few acid/base reactions that produce a precipitate in addition to the 

water  molecule shown  above.  An  example  is the  reaction  of barium  hydroxide  with 

phosphoric  acid,  which  produces  not  only  water  but  also  the  insoluble  salt  barium 

phosphate. In this reaction, there are no spectator ions, so the net ionic equation is the 

same as the full ionic equation. 

 

Double  displacement  reactions  that  feature  a  carbonate  reacting  with  an  acid 



have the net ionic equation: 

 

If  every  ion  is  a  "spectator  ion"  then  there  was  no  reaction,  and  the  net  ionic 



equation is null. [11] 

437 

 

An acid-base reaction is a chemical reaction that occurs between an acid and a 



base.  Several  concepts  exist  which  provide  alternative  definitions  for  the  reaction 

mechanisms  involved  and  their  application  in  solving  related  problems.  Despite 

several  similarities  in  definitions,  their  importance  becomes  apparent  as  different 

methods of analysis when applied to acid-base reactions for gaseous or liquid species, 

or when acid or base character may be somewhat less apparent. Historically, the first 

of  these  scientific  concepts  of  acids  and  bases  was  provided  by  the  French 

chemistAntoine Lavoisier, circa 1776.

[12] 


 

Common acid-base theories 

Lavoisier definition 

Since Lavoisier's knowledge of strong acids was mainly restricted to oxyacids, 

which  tend  to  contain  central  atoms  in  high  oxidation  states  surrounded  by  oxygen, 

such as HNO

3

 and H


2

SO

4



, and since he was not aware of the true composition of the 

hydrohalic  acids,  HCl,  HBr,  and  HI,  he  defined  acids  in  terms  of  their  containing 



oxygen, which in fact he named from Greek words meaning "acid-former" (from the 

Greek 


οξυς (oxys) meaning "acid" or "sharp" and γεινομαι (geinomai) or "engender"). 

The Lavoisier definition was held as absolute truth for over 30 years, until the 1810 

article and subsequent lectures by Sir Humphry Davy in which he proved the lack of 

oxygen in H

2

S, H


2

Te, and the hydrohalic acids. 

 

Liebig definition 

 

This definition was proposed by Justus von Liebig circa 1838,



[12]

 based on his 

extensive  works  on  the  chemical  composition  of  organic  acids.  This  finished  the 

doctrinal  shift  from  oxygen-based  acids  to  hydrogen-based  acids,  started  by  Davy. 

According  to  Liebig,  an  acid  is  a  hydrogen-containing  substance  in  which  the 

hydrogen  could  be  replaced  by  a  metal.

[14]

  Liebig's  definition,  while  completely 



empirical,  remained  in  use  for  almost  50  years  until  the  adoption  of  the  Arrhenius 

definition.

[12]

 

 



Arrhenius definition 

 

 The Arrhenius definition of acid-base reactions is a more simplified acid-base 



concept devised by Svante Arrhenius, which was used to provide a modern definition 

of bases that followed from his work with Friedrich Wilhelm Ostwald in establishing 

the presence of ions in aqueous solution in 1884, and led to Arrhenius receiving the 

Nobel  prize  in  chemistry  in  1903  for  "recognition  of  the  extraordinary  services  ... 



rendered  to  the  advancement  of  chemistry  by  his  electrolytic  theory  of 

dissociation"

[16]


 

As  defined  at  the  time  of  discovery,  acid-base  reactions  are  characterized  by 

Arrhenius  acids,  which  dissociate  in  aqueous  solution  form  hydrogen  or  the  later-

termed  oxonium  (H

3

O

+



)  ions,

[14]


  and  Arrhenius  bases  which  form  hydroxide  (OH

-



ions.  More  recent  IUPAC  recommendations  now  suggest  the  newer  term 

438 

"hydronium"

[17]

 be used in favor of the older accepted term "oxonium"



[18]

 to illustrate 

reaction mechanisms such as those defined in the Brønsted-Lowry and solvent system 

definitions  more  clearly,  with  the  Arrhenius  definition  serving  as  a  simple  general 

outline  of  acid-base  character

[16]


  More  succinctly,  the  Arrhenius  definition  can  be 

surmised as; 



 

Arrhenius  acids  form  hydrogen  ions  in  aqueous  solution  with 

Arrhenius bases forming hydroxide ions. 

 

The  universal  aqueous  acid-base  definition  of  the  Arrhenius  concept  is 

described as the formation of water from hydrogen and hydroxide ions, or hydronium 

ions  and  hydroxide  ions  produced  from  the  dissociation  of  an  acid  and  base  in 

aqueous  solution  (2  H

2



→ OH

-

  +  H



3

O

+



  )

[19]


,  which  leads  to  the  definition  that  in 

Arrhenius acid-base reactions, a salt and water is formed from the reaction between 

an acid and a base --

[16]


 in more simple scientific definitions, this form of reaction is 

called a Neutralization reaction. 

acid

+

 + base



-

 

→ salt + water 



The positive ion from a base can form a salt with the negative ion from an acid. 

For example, two moles of the basesodium hydroxide (NaOH) can combine with one 

mole  of  sulfuric  acid  (H

2

SO



4

)  to  form  two  moles  of  water  and  one  mole  of  sodium 

sulfate. 

2NaOH + H

2

SO

4



 

→ 2 H


2

O + Na


2

SO

4



 

Brønsted-Lowry definition 

Main article: Brønsted-Lowry acid-base theory 

The  Brønsted-Lowry  definition,  formulated  independently  by  its  two 

proponents Johannes Nicolaus Brønsted andMartin Lowry in 1923 is based upon the 

idea  of  protonation  of  bases  through  the  de-protonation  of  acids  --  more  commonly 

referred to as the ability of acids to "donate" hydrogen ions (H

+

) or protons to bases, 



which "accept" them.

[20]


 In contrast to the Arrhenius definition, the Brønsted-Lowry 

definition refers to the products of an acid-base reaction as conjugate acids and bases 

to  refer  to  the  relation  of  one  proton,  and  to  indicate  that  there  has  been  a  reaction 

between the two quantities, rather than a "formation" of salt and water, as explained 

in the Arrhenius definition.

. [14]


 

It  defines  that  in  reactions,  there  is  the  donation  and  reception  of  a  proton, 

which essentially refers to the removal of a hydrogen ion bonded within a compound 

and  its  reaction  with  another  compound,  and  not  the  removal  of  a  proton  from  the 

nucleus of an atom, which would require inordinate amounts of energy not attainable 

through  the  simple  dissociation  of  acids.  In  differentiation  from  the  Arrhenius 

definition,  the  Brønsted-Lowry  definition  postulates  that  for  each  acid,  there  is  a 

conjugate  acid  and  base  or  "conjugate  acid-base  pair"  that  is  formed  through  a 

complete reaction, which also includes water, which is amphoteric

[21]


AH + B 


→ BH

+

 + A



-

 

General formula for representing Brønsted-Lowry reactions. 

 

HCl (aq) + H



2

→ H



3

O

+



 (aq) + Cl

-

 (aq) 



439 

Hydrochloric  acid  completely  reacts  with  water  to  form  the  hydronium  and 

chloride ions 

CH

3



COOH + NH

3

 



→ NH

4

+



 + CH

3

COO



-

 

Acetic  acid  reacts  incompletely  with  ammonia,  no  hydronium  ions  being 



produced 

 



1   ...   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал