Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет49/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   ...   70

 

Reactivity Series 

  

All  metals  show  certain  physical  &  chemical  properties  like  malleability, 



ductility  and  a  lustrous  surface.  Almost  all  metals  release  hydrogen  gas  with  dilute 

acids.  But  the  reactivity  of  metals  towards  various  reactants  is  not  the  same.  

Some  metals  like  alkali  &  alkaline  earth  metals  (group-1  &  2)  are  very  reactive  & 

react  vigorously  with  a  reactant.  But  some  metals  like  gold  &  platinum  are  least 

reactive  and  passive  for  almost  all  reactants.  Some  metals  like  copper  release 

hydrogen gas with dilute acid. Hence, there must be some criteria for understanding 

the reactivity of different metals and predicting the products of different reactions. 

  

Reactivity Series of Metals 

Back to Top 

Elements  are  mainly  classified  under  metals  &  non-metals.  There  are  some 

elements, which have intermediate features. They are known as metalloids.  

 

 



Differences between metals & non-metals. 

 


423 

S.No 


Metal 

Non-metal 

Malleable & ductile in nature 



Brittle in nature 

Good conductor of heat & electricity  Insulator in nature 



3  

Form ionic compounds 

Form Covalent compounds 

Have lustre surface 



Not applicable 

Have high melting point 



Low melting point compare to metals 

Usually solid at room temperature 



Can exist in solid , liquid & gaseous state  

They are good reducing agent 



Good oxidizing agent 

Form basic oxides 



Form acidic oxides 

Have low electronegativity 



High electronegativity 

10   Have a tendency to lose electrons 

Have a tendency to gain electrons 

 

Almost all metals are reactive and react vigorously with various compounds. In 



the whole periodic table, more than 75% elements are metallic in nature.  

The reactivity series or activity series is an empirical arrangement of metals, in 

order of "reactivity" from highest to lowest. In other words, the most reactive metal is 

presented at the top and the least reactive metal at the bottom. 

Metal  

Symbol Reactivity  



Lithium 

Li  


 

Potassium 

K  

Strontium 



Sr  

Calcium 


Ca  

Sodium 


Na  

Magnesium 

Mg  

Aluminum 



Al  

Zinc 


Zn  

Chromium 

Cr  

Iron 


Fe  

Cadmium  

Cd  

Cobalt 


Co  

Nickel 


Ni  

Tin 


Sn  

Lead 


Pb 

Hydrogen gas  H

2

 

Antimony 



Sb  

Arsenic 


Ar  

Bismuth 


Bi  

Copper 


Cu  

Mercury 


Hg  

424 

Silver 


Ag  

 

 Hence  potassium  is  the  most  reactive  metal  and  platinum  the  least  reactive  one.  In 



the  whole  series,  only  two  non-metals  are  included,  which  are  carbon  &  hydrogen. 

Carbon helps in predicting the products formed during the extraction of iron in blast 

furnace  and  hydrogen  is  included  because  non-metals  below  it  will  not  react  with 

dilute acids. 

 

In the reactivity series, as we move from bottom to top, the reactivity of metals 



increases.  Metals  present  at  the  top  of  the  series  can  lose  electrons  more  readily  to 

form positive ions and corrode or tarnish more readily. They require more energy to 

be  separated  from  their  ores,  and  become  stronger  reducing  agents,  while  metals 

present at the bottom of the series are good oxidizing agent. 

 

By  using  the  reactivity  series,  one  can  predict  the  products  of  displacement 



reaction.  Each  element  in the  reactivity  series  can be  replaced from  a  compound by 

any of the elements above it. For example, magnesium metal can displace zinc ions in 

a solution. 

 

 



Mg(s) 



Zn

2+ 

→→ 



Zn(s) 



Mg

2+ 

 

 The interval between metals in the reactivity series represents the reactivity of those 



metals towards each other. 

 If the interval between elements is larger, they will react more vigorously. The 

topmost  five  elements,  form  lithium  to  sodium  are  known  as  very  active  metals; 

hence  they  react  with  cold  water  to  produce  the  hydroxide  and  hydrogen  gas.  For 

example,  sodium  forms  sodium  hydroxide  and  hydrogen  gas  with  cold  water. 

 

2Na 





2H

2

→→ 



2NaOH 



H

2

 

 



From  magnesium  to  chromium,  elements  are  considered  as  active  metals  and 

they  will  react  with  very  hot  water  or  steam  and  form  the  oxide  and  hydrogen  gas. 

For example, aluminum reacts with steam to form aluminum oxide and hydrogen gas. 

 

2Al 





3H

2

→→ 



Al

2

O

3

 



3H

2 

 

 



From  iron  to  lead,  metals  can  replace  hydrogen  from  various  acids  like 

Hydrochloric  acid,  dilute  sulfuric  and  nitric  acids.  Oxides  of  these  metals  undergo 

reduction when heated with hydrogen gas, carbon, or carbon monoxide. Till copper, 

metals can combine directly with oxygen and form metal oxide. Elements present at 

the  bottom  from  mercury  to  gold  are  often  found  in  the  native  form  in  nature  and 

their oxides show thermal decomposition under mild conditions. 

Reactivity Series Chart 


425 

Back to Top 

We can summarize the reactivity of different metals in a reactivity series chart. 

Metal 


Symbol 

Reactivity 

Extraction 

Lithium 


Li 

displaces H

2

 gas from water, steam and 



acids and forms hydroxides 

Electrolysis 

Potassium 

K  


Strontium 

Sr  


Calcium 

Ca  


Sodium 

Na  


Magnesium  Mg  

displaces  H

2

  gas  from  steam  and  acids 



and forms hydroxides 

Aluminium  Al  

Carbon 

C  


Included for comparison 

 

Manganese  Mn  



displaces  H

2

  gas  from  steam  and  acids 



and forms hydroxides 

Smelting with coke 

Zinc 

Zn  


Chromium  Cr  

Iron 


Fe  

displaces  H

2

  gas  from  acids  only  and 



forms hydroxides 

Cadmium 


Cd  

Cobalt 


Co  

Nickel 


Ni  

Tin 


Sn  

Lead 


Pb 

Hydrogen 

gas 

H

2



 

included for comparison 

 

Antimony 



Sb 

combines  with  O

2

  to  form  oxides  and 



cannot displace H

2

 



Heat or physical 

extraction methods 

Arsenic 

Ar  


Bismuth 

Bi  


Copper 

Cu  


Mercury 

Hg  


found free in nature, oxides decompose 

with heating 

Silver 

Ag  


Paladium 

Pd  


Platinum 

Pt  


Gold 

Au  


 

 

All  metals  have  a  tendency  to  lose  electrons  and  form  metal  ions.  In  other 



words, all metals are good reducing agents and easily oxidise themselves.  

→→ M



n+

 + ne


-

 

 



 

The reactivity series of elements can be shown in another way, which includes 

oxidation  reaction  of  each  metal  to  the  respective  metal  ion.  It  gives  information 

regarding  the  reducing  power  of  the  metal  atom  and  the  oxidation  number  of  the 



426 

metal ion. 

 

Exothermic and endothermic reactions 

 

All  processes  can  be  classified  into  one  of  two  categories:  exothermic  and 

endothermic.  In  an  exothermic  process,  energy  is  released,  while in  an  endothermic 

process,  energy  is  stored.  This  section  will  specifically  cover  exothermic  and 

endothermic chemical reactions, but almost any process can be described as releasing 

or storing energy. 

The concept of giving off or storing energy can sometimes be a bit confusing, 

so  let's  go  over  some  of  the  basic  types  of  energy  that  you'll  encounter  in  your 

chemistry class, and what it means to give off and store each type of energy. 

Heat: Heat energy is the energy that accompanies temperature changes. If heat 

energy  is  being  released  then  the  reaction  from  which  it  is  released  will  become 

hotter. If heat energy is being stored, then reaction will become colder. 

Light:  If  light  energy  is  being  given  off,  then  the  reaction  will  glow.  If  it's 

being stored, then the reaction will seemingly proceed on its own without any catalyst 

present without any heat being evolved or absorbed. 

Mechanical  energy:  If  mechanical  energy  is  being  stored,  then  the  volume 

and/or pressure of the reaction will get smaller. If mechanical energy is being given 

off, then the opposite will be true. 

The most common change in energy that you'll witness in your chemistry class 

will be changes in heat energy. It can be measured with a bomb calorimeter. Energy 

released or stored in a reaction will often be expressed written as 

ΔH, or a change in 

enthalpy. A positive 

ΔH means that energy is stored and the reaction is endothermic. 

A  negative 

ΔH  means  that  energy  is  released  and  the  reaction  is  exothermic.  It  is 

usually expressed in kilojoules (kJ) or joules (J). 

 

Why Exothermic Or Endothermic? 



 

If  you  understand  the  above  section,  then  you  can  now  identify  whether  a 

reaction is exothermic or endothermic. If it gives off one of the above three types of 

energy  then  it's  exothermic,  if  it  absorbs  it,  then  it's  endothermic.  The  question  that 

still hasn't been answered, though is why? Why are some reactions exothermic while 

others are endothermic, and why does energy have to be absorbed or released at all? 

The  answer  lies  in  chemical  bonds.  Chemical  bonds  have  bond  energies 

associated with them. This bond energy is the amount energy that it takes to break the 

bonds, and also the amount of the energy that is released when the bonds are formed. 

Consequently,  if  the  bonds  in  your  reactants  have  a  higher  total  bond  energy  than 

your  products,  the  reaction  will  be  endothermic.  If  they  have  a  lower  total  bond 

energy, it will be exothermic. 

The  reason  for  this  is  the  law  of  conservation  of  energy,  which  states  that 

energy cannot be created or destroyed; it can only change forms. In this case, it would 

mean that whatever energy was used to break the bond will be released if the bond is 

reformed. For example: 



427 

Suppose  we  have  a C-H  bond somewhere,  and  we  wanted  to break  that  bond 

apart into a C and an H. We'd have to put in some amount of energy. Let's call this 

amount  'x'.  Once  we  put  in  x  energy,  by  say,  adding  heat,  the  C-H  bond  will  break 

apart.  What  happened  to  'x'  though?  The  conservation  of  energy  law  says  that  'x' 

didn't just disappear; it just took on another form, in this case exciting the electrons in 

C and H. Some of the energy went to the C atom and some went to the H atom. If the 

C-H  bond  reformed,  then  'x'  would  be  released  again.  If  the  C  went  off  and 

recombined with a different molecule (let's say a Cl), and so did the H (with an F, for 

instance). Then the energy released from the new pairings would be 'x' plus whatever 

energy the Cl and F had stored. 

Many  chemical  reactions  release  energy  in  the  form  of  heat,  light,  or  sound. 

These  are exothermic  reactions.  Exothermic  reactions  may  occur spontaneously  and 

result in higher randomness or entropy (

ΔS > 0) of the system. They are denoted by a 

negative heat flow (heat is lost to the surroundings) and decrease in enthalpy (

ΔH < 

0). In the lab, exothermic reactions produce heat or may even be explosive. 



There are other chemical reactions that must absorb energy in order to proceed. 

These are endothermic reactions. Endothermic reactions cannot occur spontaneously. 

Work  must  be  done  in  order  to  get  these  reactions  to  occur.  When  endothermic 

reactions  absorb  energy,  a  temperature  drop  is  measured  during  the  reaction. 

Endothermic reactions are characterized by positive heat flow (into the reaction) and 

an increase in enthalpy (+

ΔH). 

An  exothermic  reaction  is  one  in  which  heat  is  produced  as  one  of  the  end 



products. Â Examples of exothermic reactions from our daily life are combustion like 

the  burning  of  a  candle,  wood,  and  neutralization  reactions.  In  an  endothermic 

reaction,  the  opposite  happens.  In  this  reaction,  heat  is  absorbed.  Or  more  exactly, 

heat  is  required  to  complete  the  reaction.  Photosynthesis  in  plants  is  a  chemical 

endothermic  reaction.  In  this  process,  the  chloroplasts  in  the  leaves  absorb  the 

sunlight.  Without  sunlight  or  some  other  similar  source  of  energy,  this  reaction 

cannot be completed. 

In  exothermic  reactions  the  enthalpy  change  is  always  negative  while  in 

endothermic  reactions  the  enthalpy  change  is  always  positive.  This  is  due  to  the 

releasing  and  absorption  of  heat  energy  in  the  reactions,  respectively.  The  end 

products  are  stable  in  exothermic  reactions.  The  end  products  of  endothermic 

reactions are less stable. This is due to the weak bonds formed. 

‘Endo’  means  to  absorb  and  so  in  endothermic  reactions,  the  energy  is 

absorbed  from  the  external  surrounding  environment.  So  the  surroundings  lose 

energy and as a result  


428 

 

the  end  product has higher  energy  level  than  the  reactants.  Due  to this  higher 



energy  bonds,  the  product  is  less stable. And  most  of the  endothermic  reactions  are 

not  spontaneous.  ‘Exo’  means  to  give  off  and  so  energy  is  liberated  in  exothermic 

reactions. As a result, the surroundings get heated up. And most exothermic reactions 

are spontaneous. 

When we light a matchstick, it is an exothermic reaction. In this reaction, when 

we  strike  the  stick,  stored  energy  is  released  as  heat  spontaneously.  And  the  flame 

will  have  lower  energy  than  the  heat  produced.  The  energy  being  released  is 

previously  stored  in  the  matchstick  and  thus  do  not  require  any  external  energy  for 

the reaction to occur. 

When ice melts, it will be due to the heat around. The surrounding environment 

will  have  a  higher  temperature  than  the  ice  and  this  heat  energy  is  absorbed  by  the 

ice. The stability of the bonds is reduced and as a result and the ice melts into liquid. 

Some exothermic reactions in our lives are the digestion of food in our body, 

combustion  reactions,  water  condensations,  bomb  explosions,  and  adding  an  alkali 

metal to water.  

Reaction rate 

 

Reaction  rate,  the  speed  at  which  a  chemical  reaction  proceeds.  It  is  often 



expressed in terms of either the concentration (amount per unit volume) of a product 

that is formed in a unit of time or the concentration of a reactant that is consumed in a 

unit of time. Alternatively, it may be defined in terms of the amounts of the reactants 

consumed  or  products  formed  in  a  unit  of  time.  For  example,  suppose  that  the 

balancedchemical equation for a reaction is of the formA + 3B 

→ 2Z. 


The rate could be expressed in the following alternative ways:d[Z]/dt, –d[A]/dt

d[B]/dt,  dz/dt

da/dt,  −db/dtwhere  t  is  the  time,  [A],  [B],  and  [Z]  are  the 

concentrations of the substances, and a, b, and z are their amounts. Note that these six 

expressions  are  all  different  from  one  another  but  are  simply  related.  Chemical 

reactions  proceed  at  vastly  different  speeds  depending  on  the  nature  of  the  reacting 

substances, the type of chemical transformation, the temperature, and other factors. In 

general,  reactions  in  which  atoms  or  ions  (electrically  charged  particles)  combine 

occur very rapidly, while those in which covalent bonds(bonds in which atoms share 

electrons) are broken are much slower. For a given reaction, the speed of the reaction 

will  vary  with  the  temperature,  thepressure,  and  the  amounts  of  reactants  present. 

Reactions  usually  slow  down  as  time  goes  on  because  of  the  depletion  of  the 

reactants. In some cases the addition of a substance that is not itself a reactant, called 


429 

a catalyst, accelerates a reaction. The rate constant, or the specific rate constant, is the 

proportionality  constant  in  the  equation  that  expresses  the  relationship  between  the 

rate  of  a  chemical  reaction  and  the  concentrations  of  the  reacting  substances.  The 

measurement  and  interpretation  of  reactions  constitute  the  branch  of  chemistry 

known as chemical kinetics. 

The reaction rate (rate of reaction) or speed of reaction for a reactant or product 

in  a  particular  reaction  is  intuitively  defined  as  how  fast  or  slow  a  reaction  takes 

place. For example, the oxidative rusting of iron under Earth's atmosphere is a slow 

reaction  that  can  take  many  years,  but  the  combustion  of  cellulose  in  a  fire  is  a 

reaction that takes place in fractions of a second. 

Chemical kinetics is the  part of physical  chemistry  that studies  reaction  rates. 

The concepts of chemical kinetics are applied in many disciplines, such as chemical 

engineering, enzymology and environmental engineering. 

Formal definition of reaction rate[edit] 

Consider a typical chemical reaction: 



a A + b B 

→ p P + q Q 

The  lowercase  letters  (a,  b,  p,  and  q)  represent  stoichiometric  coefficients, 

while the capital letters represent the reactants (A and B) and the products (P and Q). 

According  to  IUPAC's  Gold  Book  definition

[1]


  the  reaction  rate  r  for  a 

chemical reaction occurring in a closed system under isochoric conditions, without a 

build-up of reaction intermediates, is defined as: 

where  [X]  denotes  the  concentration  of  the  substance  X.  (Note:  The  rate  of  a 

reaction  is  always  positive.  A  negative  sign  is  present  to  indicate  the  reactant 

concentration is decreasing.) The IUPAC

[1]

 recommends that the unit of time should 



always  be  the  second.  In  such  a  case  the  rate  of  reaction  differs  from  the  rate  of 

increase  of  concentration  of  a  product  P  by  a  constant  factor  (the  reciprocal  of  its 

stoichiometric  number)  and  for  a  reactant  A  by  minus  the  reciprocal  of  the 

stoichiometric  number.  Reaction  rate  usually  has  the  units  of  mol  L

−1

  s


−1

.  It  is 

important  to  bear  in  mind  that  the  previous  definition  is  only  valid  for  a  single 

reaction,  in  a  closed  system  of  constant  volume.  This  usually  implicit  assumption 

must be stated explicitly, otherwise the definition is incorrect: If water is added to a 

pot  containing  salty  water,  the  concentration  of  salt  decreases,  although  there  is  no 

chemical reaction. 

For any open system, the full mass balance must be taken into account: in 

− out 


+ generation 

− consumption = accumulation 

where F

A0

 is the inflow rate of A in molecules per second, F



A

 the outflow, and 



v is the instantaneous reaction rate of A (in number concentration rather than molar) 

in a given differential volume, integrated over the entire system volume V at a given 

moment.  When  applied  to  the  closed  system  at  constant  volume  considered 

previously, this equation reduces to: 

where the concentration [A] is related to the number of molecules N

A

 by [A] = 



N

A

/N



0

V. Here N

0

 is the Avogadro constant. 



For a single reaction in a closed system of varying volume the so-called rate of 

conversion can be used, in order to avoid handling concentrations. It is defined as the 

derivative of the extent of reaction with respect to time. 



430 

Here 


ν

i

 is the stoichiometric coefficient for substance i, equal to abp, and q 

in  the  typical  reaction  above.  Also  V  is  the  volume  of  reaction  and  C

i

  is  the 

concentration of substance i

When  side  products  or  reaction  intermediates  are  formed,  the  IUPAC

[1]

 

recommends  the  use  of  the  terms  rate  of  appearance  and  rate  of  disappearance  for 



products and reactants, properly. 

Reaction  rates  may  also  be  defined  on  a  basis  that  is  not  the  volume  of  the 

reactor. When a catalyst is used the reaction rate may be stated on a catalyst weight 

(mol g


−1

 s

−1



) or surface area (mol m

−2

 s



−1

) basis. If the basis is a specific catalyst site 

that may be rigorously counted by a specified method, the rate is given in units of s

−1

 



and is called a turnover frequency. 

Factors influencing rate of reaction[edit] 

-  The  nature  of  the  reaction:  Some  reactions  are  naturally  faster  than  others. 

The  number  of  reacting  species,  their  physical  state  (the  particles  that  form  solids 

move much more slowly than those of gases or those in solution), the complexity of 

the reaction and other factors can greatly influence the rate of a reaction. 

-  Concentration:  Reaction  rate  increases  with  concentration,  as  described  by 

the  rate  law  and  explained  by  collision  theory.  As  reactant  concentration  increases, 

the frequencyof collision increases. 

Pressure: The rate of gaseous reactions increases with pressure, which is, in 

fact, equivalent to an increase in concentration of the gas.The reaction rate increases 

in  the  direction  where  there  are  fewer  moles  of  gas  and  decreases  in  the  reverse 

direction. For condensed-phase reactions, the pressure dependence is weak. 

Order: The order of the reaction controls how the reactant concentration (or 

pressure) affects reaction rate. 

Temperature: Usually conducting a reaction at a higher temperature delivers 

more  energy  into  the  system  and  increases  the  reaction  rate  by  causing  more 

collisions  between  particles,  as  explained  by  collision  theory.  However,  the  main 

reason  that  temperature  increases  the  rate  of  reaction  is  that  more  of  the  colliding 

particles  will  have  the  necessary  activation  energy  resulting  in  more  successful 

collisions (when bonds are formed between reactants). The influence of temperature 

is described by the Arrhenius equation. 

For example, coal burns in a fireplace in the presence of oxygen, but it does not 

when  it  is  stored  at  room  temperature.  The  reaction  is  spontaneous  at  low  and  high 

temperatures  but  at  room  temperature  its  rate  is  so  slow  that  it  is  negligible.  The 

increase in temperature, as created by a match, allows the reaction to start and then it 

heats  itself,  because  it  is  exothermic.  That  is  valid  for  many  other  fuels,  such  as 

methane, butane, and hydrogen. 

Reaction rates can be independent of temperature (non-Arrhenius) or decrease 

with increasing temperature (anti-Arrhenius). Reactions without an activation barrier 

(e.g.,  someradical  reactions),  tend  to  have  anti  Arrhenius  temperature  dependence: 

the rate constant decreases with increasing temperature. 

-  Solvent:  Many  reactions  take  place  in  solution  and  the  properties  of  the 

solvent affect the reaction rate. The ionic strength also has an effect on reaction rate. 

Electromagnetic radiation and intensity of light: Electromagnetic radiation is 


431 

a  form  of  energy.  As  such,  it  may  speed  up  the  rate  or  even  make  a  reaction 

spontaneous  as  it  provides  the  particles  of  the  reactants  with  more  energy.  This 

energy is in one way or another stored in the reacting particles (it may break bonds, 

promote  molecules  to  electronically  or  vibrationally  excited  states...)  creating 

intermediate species that react easily. As the intensity of light increases, the particles 

absorb more energy and hence the rate of reaction increases. 

For example, when methane reacts with chlorine in the dark, the reaction rate is 

very  slow.  It  can  be sped  up  when the  mixture  is put  under diffused  light.  In bright 

sunlight, the reaction is explosive. 

A catalyst: The presence of a catalyst increases the reaction rate (in both the 

forward  and  reverse  reactions)  by  providing  an  alternative  pathway  with  a  lower 

activation energy. 

For  example,  platinum  catalyzes  the  combustion  of  hydrogen  with  oxygen  at 

room temperature. 

Isotopes: The kinetic isotope effect consists in a different reaction rate for the 

same molecule if it has different isotopes, usually hydrogen isotopes, because of the 

relative mass difference between hydrogen and deuterium. 

Surface Area: In reactions on surfaces, which take place for example during 

heterogeneous catalysis, the rate of reaction increases as the surface area does. That is 

because more particles of the solid are exposed and can be hit by reactant molecules. 

-  Stirring:  Stirring  can  have  a  strong  effect  on  the  rate  of  reaction  for 

heterogeneous reactions. 

- Diffusion limit: Some reactions are limited by diffusion. 

All the factors that affect a reaction rate, except for concentration and reaction 

order, are taken into account in the reaction rate coefficient (the coefficient in the rate 

equation of the reaction). 

Rate equation[edit] 



Main article: Rate equation 

For a chemical reaction a A + b B 

→ p P + q Q, the rate equation or rate law is 

a mathematical expression used in chemical kinetics to link the rate of a reaction to 

theconcentration of each reactant. It is of the kind: 

 

For  gas  phase  reaction  the  rate  is  often  alternatively  expressed  by  partial 



pressures. 

In  these  equations  k(T)  is  the  reaction  rate  coefficient  or  rate  constant

although it is not really a constant, because it includes all the parameters that affect 

reaction rate, except for concentration, which is explicitly taken into account. Of all 

the parameters influencing reaction rates, temperature is normally the most important 

one and is accounted for by the Arrhenius equation. 

The  exponents  n  and  m  are  called  reaction  orders  and  depend  on  the  reaction 

mechanism.  For  elementary  (single-step)  reactions  the  order  with  respect  to  each 

reactant is equal to its stoichiometric coefficient. For complex (multistep) reactions, 

however,  this  is  often  not  true  and  the  rate  equation  is  determined  by  the  detailed 

mechanism, as illustrated below for the reaction of H

2

 and NO. 



For  elementary  reactions  or  reaction  steps,  the  order  and  stoichiometric 

432 

coefficient  are  both  equal  to  the  molecularity  or  number  of  molecules  participating. 

For  a  unimolecular  reaction  or  step  the  rate  is  proportional  to  the  concentration  of 

molecules of reactant, so that the rate law is first order. For a bimolecular reaction or 

step,  the  number  of  collisionsis  proportional  to  the  product  of  the  two  reactant 

concentrations, or second order. A termolecular step is predicted to be third order, but 

also very slow as simultaneous collisions of three molecules are rare. 

By  using  the  mass  balance  for  the  system  in  which  the  reaction  occurs,  an 

expression for the rate of change in concentration can be derived. For a closed system 

with constant volume, such an expression can look like 

 



1   ...   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал