Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет47/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   ...   70

Molecular, Empirical, and Structural Formulas 

Empirical vs. Molecular formulas 

 



Molecular  formulas  refer  to  the  actual  number  of  the  different  atoms 

which comprise a single molecule of a compound. 

 

Empirical formulas refer to the smallest whole number ratios of atoms in 



a particular compound. 

Compound 

Molecular Formula 

Empirical Formula 

Water 

H

2



H

2



Hydrogen Peroxide 

H

2

O



2

 

HO 



Ethylene 

C

2



H

4

 



CH

2

 



Ethane 

C

2



H

6

 



CH

3

 



Molecular  formulas  provide  more  information,  however,  sometimes  a 

substance  is  actually  a  collection  of  molecules  with  different  sizes  but  the  same 

empirical  formula.  For  example,  carbon  is  commonly  found  as  a  collection  of three 

dimensional structures (carbon chemically bonded to carbon). In this form, it is most 

easily represented simply by the empirical formula "C" (the elemental name). 

Structural formulas 

Sometimes  the  molecular  formulas  are  drawn  out  as  structural  formulas  to 

give some idea of the actual chemical bonds which unite the atoms. 

 

Structural formulas give an idea about the connections between atoms, but they 



don't necessarily give information about the actual geometry of such bonds. 

Ions 

The nucleus of an atom (containing protons and neutrons) remains unchanged 

after ordinary chemical reactions, but atoms can readily gain or lose electrons

If  electrons  are  lost  or  gained  by  a  neutral  atom,  then  the  result  is  that  a 



charged particle is formed - called an ion

402 

 

For  example,  Sodium  (Na)  has  11  protons  and  11  electrons.  However,  it  can 



easily  lose  1  electron.  The  resulting  cation  has  11  protons  and  10  electrons,  for  an 

overall net charge of 1+ (the units are electron charge). The ionic state of an atom or 

compound is represented by a superscript to the right of the chemical formula: Na

+



Mg

2+

 (note the in the case of 1+, or 1-, the '1'is omitted). In contrast to the Na atom, 



the  Chlorine  atom  (Cl)  easily  gains  1  electron  to  yield  the  chloride  ion  Cl

-

  (i.e.  17 



protons and 18 electrons). 

In  general,  metal  atoms  tend  to  lose  electrons,  and  nonmetal  atoms  tend  to 

gain electrons. 

Na

+



 and Cl

-

 are simple ions, in contrast to polyatomic ions such as NO



3

-

 (nitrate 



ion)  and  SO

4

2-



  (sulfate  ion).  These  are  compounds  made  up  of  chemically  bonded 

atoms, but have a net positive or negative charge. 

The chemical properties of an ion are greatly different from those of the atom 

from which it was derived. 



Predicting ionic charges 

Many atoms gain or lose electrons such that they end up with the same number 

of electrons as the noble gas closest to them in the periodic table. 

The noble gasses are generally chemically non-reactive, they would appear to 

have a stable arrangement of electrons. 

Other  elements  must  gain  or  lose  electrons,  to  end  up  with  the  same 

arrangement  of  electrons  as  the  noble  gases,  in  order  to  achieve  the  same  kind  of 

electron stability. 

 

Example: Nitrogen 



Nitrogen has an atomic number of 7; the neutral Nitrogen atom has 7 protons 

and 7 electrons. If Nitrogen gained three electrons it would have 10 electrons, like the 

Noble  gas  Neon  (10  protons,  10  electrons).  However,  unlike  Neon,  the  resulting 

Nitrogen ion would have a net charge of N



3-

 (7 protons, 10 electrons). 



The  location  of  the  elements  on  the  Periodic  table  can  help  in  predicting  the 

expected charge of ionic forms of the elements. 

This is mainly true for the elements on either side of the chart. 

 

Ionic compounds 

Ions  form  when  one  or  more  electrons  transfer  from  one  neutral  atom  to 

another.  For  example,  when  elemental  sodium  is  allowed  to  react  with  elemental 

chlorine an electron transfers from a neutral sodium to a neutral chlorine. The result 

is a sodium ion (Na

+

) and a chlorine ion, chloride (Cl



-

): 


403 

 

The oppositely charged ions attract one another and bind together to form NaCl 



(sodium chloride) an ionic compound

An ionic compound contains positively and negatively charged ions 

It  should  be  pointed  out  that  the  Na

+

  and  Cl



-

  ions  are  not  chemically  bonded 

together.  Whereas  atoms  in  molecular  compounds,  such  as  H

2

O,  are  chemically 



bonded. 

Ionic compounds are generally combinations of metals and non-metals. 

Molecular compounds are general combinations of non-metals only. 

Pure  ionic  compounds  typically  have  their  atoms  in  an  organized  three 

dimensional  arrangement  (a  crystal).  Therefore,  we  cannot  describe  them  using 

molecular formulas. We can describe them usingempirical formulas

 

If we know the charges of the ions comprising an ionic compound, then we can 



determine  the  empirical  formula.  The  key  is  knowing  that  ionic  compounds  are 

always electrically neutral overall. 



Therefore,  the  concentration  of  ions  in  an  ionic  compound  are  such  that  the 

overall charge is neutral

In  the  NaCl  example,  there  will  be  one  positively  charged  Na

+

  ion  for  each 



negatively charged Cl

-

 ion. 



What about the ionic compound involving Barium ion (Ba

2+

) and the Chlorine 



ion (Cl

-

)? 



1 (Ba

2+

) + 2 (Cl



-

) = neutral charge 

Resulting empirical formula: BaCl

[2] 



Atomic structure 

The Nucleus 



404 

The atomic nucleus is the central area of the atom. It is composed of two kinds 

of subatomic particles: protons and neutrons. 

 

Diagram  showing  the  atomic  structure 



with  the  protons  and  neutrons  held  together 

to form the dense area of the nucleus. 

Atoms are the building blocks of all matter. Everything you can see, feel and 

touch is all made of atoms. There are even things you cannot see, feel, hear or touch 

that are also made of atoms. Basically, everything is made up of atoms. 

In 1909, Ernest Rutherford led Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden through what 

is  known  as  the  Gold  Foil  Experiments.  During  the  experiments  they  would  shoot 

particles through extremely thin sheets of gold foil. In 1911, Rutherford came to the 

conclusion  that  the  atom  had  a  dense  nucleus  because  most  of  the  particles  shot 

straight through, but some of the particles were deflected due to the dense nucleus of 

the  gold  atoms.  This  theory  would  eliminate  the  idea  that  the  atom  was  structured 

more like plum pudding. The plum pudding model was the leading model of atomic 

structure until Rutherford's findings. 

 

Atomic Numbers 



The  atomic  nucleus  is  in  the  center  of  the  atom.  The  number  of  protons  and 

neutrons in the atom define what type of atom or element it is. An element is a bunch 

of atoms that all have the same type of atomic structure. For instance, hydrogen is an 

element. Every hydrogen atom is made up of 1 proton, 0 neutrons, and 1 electron. 

The  composition  of the  atomic  nucleus gives us  lots of  information  about the 

element  it  represents.  The  number  of  protons  inside  the  nucleus  gives  us  theatomic 



number.  The  protons  have  a  positive  (+)  charge.  In  order  for  the  atom  to  have  a 

neutral  charge,  the  electrons  (-)  need  to  balance  it  out  with  their  negative  charge. 

Therefore,  in  a  neutral  atomthere  are  just  as  many  protons  as  electrons.  So,  if  you 

know  the  atomic  number  and  know  the  charge  of  the  atom  then  the  number  of 

electrons is easy to find. For instance, hydrogen has 1 proton, 1+, so in order for the 

hydrogen  atom  to  be  neutral  it  must  have  1-  charge.  Therefore,  hydrogen  has  1 



405 

electron. 

Where do the neutrons fit in all of this? Well,neutrons are neutral. To keep it 

all straight I use the first letters: Neutrons are Neutral, and Protons arePositive. I then 

remember Electrons through the process of Elimination. 

Although  the  neutrons  do  not  give  the  atom  any  charge,  they  still  hold  their 

own  weight  in  the  importance  of  the  atomic  structure.  The  neutron  is  the  largest  of 

the  subatomic  particles.  When  put  the  neutrons  and  protons  together  we  get  the 



atomic  mass.  The  electrons  are  so  small  that  their  mass  only  counts  for  .01%.  The 

electrons  are  not  inside  of  the  nucleus;  instead  they  are  flying  around  like  crazy  on 

the outside of the nucleus. 

Since  the  atomic  number  gives  us  the  number  of  protons  in  an  atom  and  the 

atomic mass gives us the number of protons and neutrons, we can find the number of 

neutrons by subtracting the atomic number from the atomic mass. 

Atomic mass - atomic number = number of neutrons. 

The  atomic  number  of  an  atom  gives  each  element  its  identity.  You  can  find 

out which element it is by its atomic number and reverse the process to find out what 

the atomic number is if you know which element you are working with. 

Let's run through all of the numbers with an element, oxygen. 

Oxygen 


Atomic Number: 8  

Atomic Mass: 16 [3]  

 

The ability of atoms to lose or to gain electrons.  



Next, let's review two atomic properties important to bonding that are related to 

the position of the element on the periodic table. They are the tendency or ability of 

atoms tolose electrons and the tendency or ability to gain electrons.  

First,  let's  consider  the  ability  to  lose  electrons.  This  is  related  to  ionization 



energy, which you studied in a previous lesson. The ionization energy, of course, is 

the  amount  of  energy  that  it  takes  to  remove  an  electron  from  an  atom.  You  have 

learned that the ionization energies are lowest for the elements down and on the left 

hand side of the periodic table and increase as you go up and all the way across to the 

right including the inert gases.  

The  ionization  energy  measures how hard it is  to lose  or  remove  an  electron. 

High ionization energy means that it is hard to lose electrons. Low ionization energy 

means that it easy to lose electrons. The elements on the left side lose their electrons 

fairly easily and the elements on the right side of the periodic table do not lose their 

electrons very easily. Taking vertical position on the table into account, the elements 

that are lower on the table lose electrons more easily and the elements that are higher 

have a harder time losing electrons. Thus the overall trend is from most easily losing 

electrons  on  the  lower  left  to  least  easily  losing  electrons  on  the  upper  right.  Keep 

that trend in mind. 

Ability to Lose Electrons 

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



 

 

 



 

406 

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



 

 

 



 

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



The ability to gain electrons is also related to the position on the periodic table. 

You should recall that as you go from left to right on the periodic table, the attraction 

for electrons increases and the ability to gain electrons increases. This is true all the 

way across the periodic table except/em> for the inert gases. There is an abrupt drop 

in the  ability  to gain  electrons  when  we  get to the  inert  gases.  This is because  their 

energy level is full and any additional electrons will have to start a new energy level. 

Ability to Gain Electrons 

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

 



 

 

 



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

!--



mstheme-

->  


 

 

 



    

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

  



  

  

 



1.4 Classification of Chemical Bond Types  

Types of Chemical Bonds 

A group of atoms bonded to one another form a molecule. 

If the molecule has more than one type of element present it is a compound. 



Different types of bonds hold molecules and compounds together. 

These 2 types of bonds are 1. ionic and 2. covalent. 

Atoms  start  off  with  the  same  number  of  positive  protons  and  negative 

electrons. This way the opposite charges cancel each other out. 

Charged atoms, or ions, can form when atoms lose or gain electrons- remember 

that atoms will gain or lose electrons in order to have a full outer shell. 

If an atom starts off with 9 protons and 9 electrons, the positive and negative 

charges are balanced out. However, this atom only has 7 electrons in its outer shell, 

so it wants 1 more electron to have 8 and be happy. But when the atom gains an extra 

negative electron, it now has 10 negative electrons and 9 positive protons. Therefore 

its overall  charge is  -1.  If  an  atom  has one  electron in its outer  shell,  it  will usually 

give that electron away and use the next lower shell as a "full" outer shell. When it 

gives a negative electron away, it becomes a positively charged ion. 

Positive  and  negative  ions  are  attracted  to  one  another  and  bond  together  in 

ionic bonds. 


407 

 

A  salt  is  a  dry  solid  composed  of  atoms  connected  by  ionic  bonds  Ex-  table 



salt. 

A  covalent  bond  results  when  two  atoms  share  electrons,  thereby  completing 

their valence shells 

 

Chemical Reactions 

When molecules or compounds are chemically changed it is called a chemical 

reaction. 

Photosynthesis  is  an  example  of  a  chemical  reaction.  In  photosynthesis  (the 

chemical  equation  is  shown  below),  the  atoms  in  water  and  carbon  dioxide  are 

rearranged to form sugar and oxygen gas. 

  

Molecules that participate in a reaction are reactants

Molecules formed by a reaction are products

  

 



Water's Importance to Life 

Water is the single most important molecule of earth 

All organisms are 70-90% water. 

Water has unique properties that make it a life-supporting substance. 



The Structure of Water 

Atoms  differ  in  their  electronegativity,  or  their  attraction  for  electrons  in  a 

covalent bond. 


408 

Oxygen  has  a  very  strong  attraction  for  electrons,  so  when  oxygen  is  sharing 

electrons with two hydrogen atoms, it gets the negative electrons slightly more than 

its fair share of the time. Since the negative electrons are near the oxygen end, more 

of the time, the oxygen is slightly negative. The hydrogen ends of water are slightly 

positive because the hydrogen atoms each have a positively charged proton that is left 

by itself when oxygen is sharing the electrons unfairly. 

The  unequal  sharing  of  electrons  in  a  molecule  such  as  water  makes  the 

molecule polar

Polar  water  molecules  are  attracted  to  one  another  and  can  form  hydrogen 



bonds

 

Properties of Water 

Water is a solvent that can dissolve many substances. 

 

NaCl is the chemical compound that we call table salt. 



Molecules that are polar and which are attracted to water are hydrophilic (ex. 

sugar, salt). 

Molecules  that  are  non  polar  have  no  charges  cannot  attract  water.  These  are 

called hydrophobic (ex. oil, grease, fat). 

Water dissolves polar substances and ions. 

Water molecules stick to each other and to other substances 

  

Water also has a high surface tension



The stronger the force between molecules in a liquid, the stronger the surface 

tension. 

  


409 

 

  

Frozen water (ice) is less dense than liquid water, so ice floats. 

Unlike  other  substances,  water  expands  as  it  freezes.  This  is  because  the 

hydrogen  bonds  of  liquid  water  are  continuously  breaking  and  reforming.  When 

water freezes, all of the water molecules are perfectly hydrogen bonded together. In 

order  for  them  to  be  hydrogen  bonded  together,  they  must  all  be  perfectly  aligned 

with each other. the water molecules must spread out a little in order for them to all 

line up perfectly as water freezes. This makes them spread out as the water freezes. 

This spreading during freezing can burst water pipes and automobile radiators. 

 

So  far,  we’ve  studied  atoms  and  compounds  and  how  they  react  with  each 



other. Now let’s take a look at how these atoms and molecules hold together. Bonds 

hold atoms and molecules of substances together. There are several different kinds of 

bonds;  the  type  of  bond  seen  in  elements  and  compounds  depends  on  the  chemical 

properties  as  well  as  the  attractive  forces  governing  the  atoms  and  molecules.  The 

three  types  of  chemical  bonds  are  Ionic  bonds,  Covalent  bonds,  and  Polar  covalent 

bonds. Chemists also recognize hydrogen bonds as a fourth form of chemical bond, 

though their properties align closely with the other types of bonds. 

In  order  to  understand  bonds,  you  must  first  be  familiar  with  electron 

properties,  including  valence  shell  electrons.  The  valence  shell  of  an  atom  is  the 

outermost  layer  (shell)  of  an  electron.  Though  today  scientists  generally  agree  that 

electrons do not rotate around the nucleus, it was thought throughout history that each 

electron  orbited  the  nucleus  of  an  atom  in  a  separate  layer  (shell).  Today,  scientists 

have  concluded  that  electrons  hover  in  specific  areas  of  the  atom  and  do  not  form 

orbits; however, the valence shell is still used to describe electron availability. 

One  can  determine  how  many  electrons  an  atom  will  have  by  looking  at  its 

periodic  properties.  In  order  to determine  an  element’s  periodic  properties,  you  will 

need  to  locate  a  periodic  table.  After  you’ve  found  your  periodic  table,  look  at  the 

roman  numerals  above  each  column  of  the  table.  You  should  see  that  above 

Hydrogen, there’s  a  IA,  above Beryllium  there’s  a  IIA,  above Boron  there’s a  IIIA, 


410 

and so on all the way to Fluorine, which is VIIA. Also, note that the metals are all in 

group  B—their roman numerals have the letter  B afterwards  instead  of the letter  A. 

For now, we are going to ignore the columns with a B, and focus on the columns with 

an  A  (the  non-metals,  generally  speaking).  Once  you  have  located  the  group-A 

elements, we are going to count across, giving each column a number, like this: 

 

The  first  A-column  is  I  (1),  then  counting  across,  2-8  (skipping  the  B  group, 



which  consists  of  metals).  In  the  periodic  table  we  labeled  the  8th  column  as  0, 

however  when  counting  electrons,  we’ll  count  it  as  8.  Now,  we  can  determine  how 

many valence electrons each element has in its outermost shell. The elements in the 

IA column have 1 valence electron. The elements in the IIA column have 2 bonding 

electrons, and so on. By the time we get to the noble gases (the column labeled 0), we 

are up to 8 bonding electrons. This means that these gases can stand on their own, or 

donate electrons to another element, but they cannot accept any more electrons. This 

is because the electrons they have satisfy the octet rule

The Octet and Duet Rules 

When  it  comes  to  bonding,  everything  is  based  on  how  many  electrons  an 

element  has  or  shares  with  its  compound  partner  or  partners.  The  octet  rule  is 

followed by most elements, and it says that to be stable, an atom needs to have eight 

electrons in its outermost shell. Elements that do not follow the octet rule are H, He, 

B, Li and Be (sometimes). Lithium gives up an electron whereas the other elements 

listed here gain one. These elements instead follow the duet rule which says that the 

atoms only need two valence electrons to be stable. When bonding, stability is always 

considered and preferred. Therefore, atoms bond in order to become more stable than 

they already are. 

Not  all  atoms  bond  the  same  way,  so  we  need  to  learn  the  different  types  of 

bonds  that  atoms  can  form.  There  are  three  (sometimes  four)  recognized  chemical 

bonds; they are ionic, covalent, polar covalent, and (sometimes) hydrogen bonds. 



1   ...   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал