Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет46/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   70

 

Nuclear physic 

Nuclear  physics  is  the  field  of  physics  that  studies  atomic  nuclei  and  their 

constituents  and  interactions.  The  most  commonly  known  application  of  nuclear 

physics is nuclear power generation, but the research has led to applications in many 

fields,  including  nuclear  medicine  and  magnetic  resonance  imaging,  nuclear 

weapons,  ion  implantation  in  materials  engineering,  and  radiocarbon  dating 

ingeology and archaeology. 

The  field  of  particle  physics  evolved  out  of  nuclear  physics  and  is  typically 

taught in close association with nuclear physics. 

The  history  of  nuclear  physics  as  a  discipline  distinct  from  atomic  physics 


394 

starts  with  the  discovery  of  radioactivity  by  Henri  Becquerel  in  1896,

[1]

  while 


investigating phosphorescence in uranium salts.

[2]


 The discovery of the electron by J. 

J.  Thomson

[3]

  a  year  later  was  an indication  that  the  atom  had  internal  structure.  At 



the beginning of the 20th century the accepted model of the atom was J. J. Thomson's 

"plum pudding" model in which the atom was a positively charged ball with smaller 

negatively charged electrons embedded inside it. 

In  the  years  that  followed,  radioactivity  was  extensively  investigated,  notably 

by  the  husband  and  wife  team  of  Pierre  Curie  and  Marie  Curie  and  by  Ernest 

Rutherford  and  his  collaborators.  By  the  turn  of  the  century  physicists  had  also 

discovered three types of radiation emanating from atoms, which they named alpha, 

beta,  and  gamma  radiation.  Experiments  by  Otto  Hahn  in  1911  and  by  James 

Chadwick  in  1914  discovered  that  the  beta  decay  spectrum  was  continuous  rather 

than discrete. That is, electrons were ejected from the atom with a continuous range 

of energies, rather than the discrete amounts of energy that were observed in gamma 

and  alpha  decays.  This  was  a  problem  for  nuclear  physics  at  the  time,  because  it 

seemed to indicate that energy was not conserved in these decays. 

The  1903  Nobel  Prize  in  Physics  was  awarded  jointly  to  Becquerel  for  his 

discovery  and  to  Pierre  Curie  and  Marie  Curie  for  their  subsequent  research  into 

radioactivity. Rutherford was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1908 for his 

"investigations  into  the  disintegration  of  the  elements  and  the  chemistry  of 

radioactive substances". 

In  1905  Albert  Einstein  formulated  the  idea  of  mass–energy  equivalence. 

While  the  work  on  radioactivity  by  Becquerel  and  Marie  Curie  predates  this,  an 

explanation  of  the  source  of  the  energy  of  radioactivity  would  have  to  wait  for  the 

discovery that the nucleus itself was composed of smaller constituents, the nucleons. 



 

7. Astronomy  

 

Cosmology 

Cosmology (from the Greek 

κόσμος, kosmos "world" and -λογία, -logia "study 

of"), is the study of the origin, evolution, and eventual fate of the universe. Physical 

cosmology  is  the  scholarly  and  scientific  study  of  the  origin,  evolution,  large-scale 

structures  and  dynamics,  and  ultimate  fate  of  the  universe,  as  well  as  the  scientific 

laws that govern these realities.

[1]

 

The  term  cosmology  was  first  used  in  English  in  1656  in  Thomas  Blount's 



Glossographia,

[2]


  and  in  1731  taken  up  in  Latin  byGerman  philosopher  Christian 

Wolff, in Cosmologia Generalis.

[3]

 

Religious  or  mythological  cosmology  is  a  body  of  beliefs  based  on 



mythological,  religious,  and  esoteric  literature  and  traditions  ofcreation  and 

eschatology. 

Physical  cosmology  is  studied  by  scientists,  such  as  astronomers  and 

physicists,  as  well  as  philosophers,  such  asmetaphysicians,  philosophers  of  physics, 

and  philosophers  of  space  and  time.  Because  of  this  shared  scope  with 

philosophy,theories  in  physical  cosmology  may  include  both  scientific  and  non-

scientific  propositions,  and  may  depend  upon  assumptions  that  can  not  be  tested. 


395 

Cosmology differs from astronomy in that the former is concerned with the Universe 

as  a  whole  while  the  latter  deals  with  individual  celestial  objects.  Modern  physical 

cosmology  is  dominated  by  the  Big  Bang  theory,  which  attempts  to  bring  together 

observational  astronomy  and  particle  physics;

[4]


  more  specifically,  a  standard 

parameterization  of  the  Big  Bang  with  dark  matter  and  dark  energy,  known  as  the 

Lambda-CDM model. 

Theoretical  astrophysicist  David  N.  Spergel  has  described  cosmology  as  a 

"historical science" because "when we look out in space, we look back in time" due 

to the finite nature of the speed of light.

[5]

 

Physics  and  astrophysics  have  played  a  central  role  in  shaping  the 



understanding of the universe through scientific observation and experiment. Physical 

cosmology  was  shaped  through  both  mathematics  and  observation  in  an  analysis  of 

the whole universe. The universe is generally understood to have begun with the Big 

Bang,  followed  almost  instantaneously  by  cosmic  inflation;  an  expansion  of  space 

from  which  the  universe  is  thought  to  have  emerged  13.799  ±  0.021  billion  years 

ago.


[6]

  Cosmogony  studies  the  origin  of  the  Universe,  and  cosmography  maps  the 

features of the Universe. 

In  Diderot's  Encyclopédie,  cosmology  is  broken  down  into  uranology  (the 

science of the heavens), aerology (the science of the air), geology (the science of the 

continents), and hydrology (the science of waters).

[7]

 

Metaphysical cosmology has also been described as the placing of man in the 



universe in relationship to all other entities. This is exemplified by Marcus Aurelius's 

observation that a man's place in that relationship: "He who does not know what the 

world is does not know where he is, and he who does not know for what purpose the 

world exists, does not know who he is, nor what the world is."

[8]

 

 



Astrophysics  

Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that employs the principles of physics 

and  chemistry  "to  ascertain  the  nature  of  theheavenly  bodies,  rather  than  their 

positions or motions in space."

[1][2]


 Among the objects studied are the Sun, other stars, 

galaxies,extrasolar  planets,  the  interstellar  medium  and  the  cosmic  microwave 

background.

[3][4]


 Their emissions are examined across all parts of the electromagnetic 

spectrum, and the properties examined include luminosity, density, temperature, and 

chemical  composition.  Because  astrophysics  is  a  very  broad  subject,  astrophysicists 

typically  apply  many  disciplines  of  physics,  including  mechanics,electromagnetism, 

statistical  mechanics,  thermodynamics,  quantum  mechanics,  relativity,  nuclear  and 

particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. 

In practice, modern astronomical research often involves a substantial amount 

of  work in  the  realms of theoretical  and  observational physics.  Some  areas of study 

for astrophysicists include their attempts to determine: the properties of dark matter, 

dark  energy,  andblack  holes;  whether  or  not  time  travel  is  possible,  wormholes  can 

form,  or  the  multiverse  exists;  and  the  origin  and  ultimate  fate  of  the  universe.

[3]


 

Topics  also  studied  by  theoretical  astrophysicists  include:  Solar  System  formation 

and  evolution;  stellar  dynamics  andevolution;  galaxy  formation  and  evolution; 

magnetohydrodynamics;  large-scale  structure  of  matter  in  the  universe;  origin  of 



396 

cosmic  rays;  general  relativity  and  physical  cosmology,  including  string  cosmology 

and astroparticle physics. 

Astrophysics  can  be  studied  at  the  bachelors,  masters,  and  Ph.D.  levels  in 

physics or astronomy departments at many universities. 

Although  astronomy  is  as  ancient  as  recorded  history  itself,  it  was  long 

separated  from  the  study  of  terrestrial  physics.  In  the  Aristotelianworldview,  bodies 

in the sky appeared to be unchanging spheres whose only motion was uniform motion 

in a circle, while the earthly world was the realm which underwent growth and decay 

and in which natural motion was in a straight line and ended when the moving object 

reached  its  goal.  Consequently,  it  was  held  that  the  celestial  region  was  made  of  a 

fundamentally different kind of matter from that found in the terrestrial sphere; either 

Fire as maintained by Plato, or Aether as maintained by Aristotle.

[5][6]


 During the 17th 

century, natural philosophers such as Galileo,

[7]

 Descartes,



[8]

 and Newton

[9]

 began to 



maintain  that  the  celestial  and  terrestrial  regions  were  made  of  similar  kinds  of 

material  and  were  subject  to  the  same  natural  laws.

[10]

  Their  challenge  was  that  the 



tools had not yet been invented with which to prove these assertions.

[11]


 

For much of the nineteenth century, astronomical research was focused on the 

routine work of measuring the positions and computing the motions of astronomical 

objects.


[12][13]

  A  new  astronomy,  soon  to  be  called  astrophysics,  began  to  emerge 

when William Hyde Wollaston andJoseph von Fraunhofer independently discovered 

that,  when  decomposing  the  light  from  the  Sun,  a  multitude  of  dark  lines  (regions 

where  there  was  less  or  no  light)  were  observed  in  the  spectrum.

[14]


  By  1860  the 

physicist, Gustav Kirchhoff, and the chemist, Robert Bunsen, had demonstrated that 

the  dark  lines  in  the  solar  spectrum  corresponded  to  bright  lines  in  the  spectra  of 

known gases, specific lines corresponding to unique chemical elements.

[15]

 Kirchhoff 



deduced that the dark lines in the solar spectrum are caused by absorption bychemical 

elements  in  the  Solar  atmosphere.

[16]

  In  this  way  it  was  proved  that  the  chemical 



elements found in the Sun and stars were also found on Earth. 

Among those who extended the study of solar and stellar spectra was Norman 

Lockyer, who in 1868 detected bright, as well as dark, lines in solar spectra. Working 

with the chemist, Edward Frankland, to investigate the spectra of elements at various 

temperatures and pressures, he could not associate a yellow line in the solar spectrum 

with any known elements. He thus claimed the line represented a new element, which 

was called helium, after the GreekHelios, the Sun personified.

[17][18]


 

In  1885,  Edward  C.  Pickering  undertook  an  ambitious  program  of  stellar 

spectral  classification  at  Harvard  College  Observatory,  in  which  a  team  of  woman 

computers,  notablyWilliamina  Fleming,  Antonia  Maury,  and  Annie  Jump  Cannon, 

classified  the  spectra  recorded  on  photographic  plates.  By  1890,  a  catalog  of  over 

10,000  stars  had  been  prepared  that  grouped  them  into  thirteen  spectral  types. 

Following Pickering's vision, by 1924 Cannon expanded the catalog to nine volumes 

and over  a  quarter  of  a  million stars,  developing the  Harvard  Classification  Scheme 

which was accepted for world-wide use in 1922.

[19]


 

In  1895,  George  Ellery  Hale  and  James  E.  Keeler,  along  with  a  group  of  ten 

associate editors from Europe and the United States,

[20]


 established The Astrophysical 

Journal:  An  International  Review  of  Spectroscopy  and  Astronomical  Physics.

[21]

  It 


397 

was  intended  that  the  journal  would  fill  the  gap  between  journals  in  astronomy  and 

physics, providing a venue for publication of articles on astronomical applications of 

the  spectroscope;  on  laboratory  research  closely  allied  to  astronomical  physics, 

including wavelength determinations of metallic and gaseous spectra and experiments 

on radiation and absorption; on theories of the Sun, Moon, planets, comets, meteors, 

and nebulae; and on instrumentation for telescopes and laboratories.

[20]


 

In  1925  Cecilia  Helena  Payne  (later  Cecilia  Payne-Gaposchkin)  wrote  an 

influential doctoral dissertation at Radcliffe College, in which she applied ionization 

theory  to  stellar  atmospheres  to  relate  the  spectral  classes  to  the  temperature  of 

stars.

[22]


  Most  significantly,  she  discovered  that  hydrogen  and  helium  were  the 

principal components of stars. This discovery was so unexpected that her dissertation 

readers  convinced  her  to  modify  the  conclusion  before  publication.  However,  later 

research confirmed her discovery.

[23]

 

By the end of the 20th century, further study of stellar and experimental spectra 



advanced, particularly as a result of the advent of quantum physics.

[24]


 

398 

5. 

Тexts on chemistry in english for high school 

 

listening  



Atoms, Molecules and Ions 

 

All  matter,  whether  living  or  nonliving,  is  made  of  the  same  tiny  building 

blocks, called atoms. An atom is the smallest basic unit of matter. All atoms have the 

same basic structure, composed of three smaller particles. 

 • Protons: A proton is a positively charged particle in an atom’s nucleus. The 

nucleus is the dense center of an atom 

. • Neutrons: A neutron has no electrical charge, has about the same mass as a 

proton, and is also found in an atom’s nucleus. 

 •  Electrons:  An  electron  is  a  negatively  charged  particle  found  outside  the 

nucleus. Electrons are much smaller than either protons or neutrons. Different types 

of  atoms  are  called  elements,  which  cannot  be  broken  down  by  ordinary  chemical 

means.  Which  element  an  atom  is  depends  on  the  number  of  protons  in  the  atom’s 

nucleus.  For  example,  all  hydrogen  atoms  have  one  proton,  and  all  oxygen  atoms 

have 16 protons. Only about 25 different elements are found in organisms. Atoms of 

different elements can link, or bond, together to form compounds. Atoms form bonds 

in two ways. 

 • Ionic bonds: An ion is an atom that has gained or lost one or more electrons. 

Some atoms form positive ions, which happens when an atom loses electrons. Other 

atoms  form  negative  ions,  which  happens  when  an  atom  gains  electrons.  An  ionic 

bond forms through the electrical force between oppositely charged ions. [1] 

 • Covalent bonds: A covalent bond forms when atoms share one or more pairs 

of  electrons.  A  molecule  is  two  or  more  atoms  that  are  held  together  by  covalent 

bonds. 

2.1 Laws of Chemical Combination—The basic laws of chemical combination 



are the law of conservation of mass, the law of constant composition, and the law of 

multiple proportions.  Each  played  an important  role in  Dalton’s development  of  the 

atomic theory. 

2.2  John  Dalton  and  the  Atomic  Theory  of  Matter—Dalton  developed  his 

atomic  theory  to  account  for  the  basic  laws  of  chemical  combination.  The  theory 

centered around the existence of indivisible small particles of matter called atoms and 

addressed  the  unique  nature  of  chemical  elements,  the  formation  of  chemical 

compounds  from  atoms  of  different  elements,  and  the  atomic  nature  of  chemical 

reactions. 

2.3  The  Divisible  Atom—Of  the  fundamental  particles  found  in  atoms,  the 

three  of  most  concern  to  chemists  are  protons,  neutrons,  and  electrons.  Protons  and 

neutrons make up the nucleus, and their combined number is the mass number, A, of 

the atom. The number of protons is the atomic number, Z. Electrons are found outside 

the  nucleus,  and  their  number  is  also  equal  to  the  atomic  number.  The  negative 

charge  on  an  electron  is  equal  in  magnitude  to  the  positive  charge  on  a  proton.  All 

atoms  of  an  element  have  the  same  atomic  number,  but  they  may  have  different 

numbers of neutrons and hence different mass numbers. Atoms containing the same 


399 

number of protons (atomic number) but different numbers of neutrons (mass number) 

are isotopes of an element. Chemical symbols for isotopes are commonly written in 

the form 

 with Abeing the mass number and Z the atomic number of the element E. 

2.4  Atomic  Masses—The  atomic  mass  of  an  element  is  a  weighted  average 

value  calculated  from  the  masses  and  relative  abundances  of  its  naturally  occurring 

isotopes.  Theatomic  mass  unit  represents  the  standard  unit  of  measure  of  atomic 

masses; it is exactly 

 of the mass of a carbon-12 atom. 

2.5  The  Periodic  Table:  Elements  Organized—The  periodic  table  is  an 

arrangement  of  the  elements  by  atomic  number  into  rows  and  columns.  This 

arrangement  places  elements  having  similar  properties  in  the  same  vertical  groups 

(families).  This  arrangement  also  allows  for  the  classification  of  elements  as  metal, 

nonmetal, or metalloid. 

2.6  Molecules  and  Molecular  Compounds—A  chemical  formula,  the  generic 

term  for  the  various  notations  used  to  represent  compounds,  indicates  the  relative 

numbers of  atoms  of  each type  in  a  compound.  An  empirical  formula  expresses the 

simplest  atom  ratio,  and  a  molecular  formula  reflects  the  actual  composition  of  a 

molecule.Structural  formulas  describe  the  arrangement  of  atoms  within  molecules. 

Molecular models are also used to represent the structure and shape of molecules. For 

example, for acetic acid: 

 

A  molecular  compound  consists  of  molecules.  In  a  binary  molecular 



compound,  the  molecules  are  made  up  of  atoms  of  two  elements.  In  naming  these 

compounds,  the  numbers  of  atoms  in  the  molecules  are  denoted  by  prefixes;  the 

names also feature -ide endings. 

Examples: NI

3

 = nitrogen triiodide S



2

F

4



 = disulfur tetrafluoride 

2.7  Ions  and  Ionic  Compounds—Ions  are  formed  by  the  loss  or  gain  of 

electrons by single atoms or groups of atoms. Positive ions are cations, and negative 

ions areanions. An ionic compound is made up of cations and anions held together by 

electrostatic  attractions.  Chemical  formulas  of  ionic  compounds  are  based  on  an 

electrically neutral combination of cations and anions called a formula unit, such as 

NaCl. 

The  names  of  some  monatomic  cations  include  roman  numerals  to  designate 



the charge on the ion. The names of monatomic anions are those of the nonmetallic 

elements,  modified  to  an  -ide  ending.  Polyatomic  ions  contain  more  than one  atom. 

For polyatomic anions, the prefixes hypo- and per- and the endings -ite and -ate are 

commonly  used.  A  hydrate  is  an  ionic  compound  that  includes  a  fixed  number  of 

water molecules associated with the formula unit. 

Examples: 

 

 



 

400 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



2.8  Acids,  Bases,  and  Salts—According  to  the  Arrhenius  theory,  an  acid 

produces H

+

 in water and a base produces OH



-

. A neutralization reaction between an 

acid and a base forms water and an ionic compound called a salt. Binary acids have 

hydrogen and a nonmetal as their constituent elements. Their names feature the prefix 



hydro- and the ending -ic attached to the stem of the name of the nonmetal. Ternary 

oxoacids  have  oxygen  as  an  additional  constituent  element,  and  their  names  use 

prefixes (hypo- andper-) and endings (-ous and -ic) to indicate the number of O atoms 

per molecule. 



Examples: 

 

 



2.9  Organic  Compounds—Organic  compounds  are  based  on  the  element 

carbon. Hydrocarbons contain only hydrogen and carbon. Alkanes have carbon atoms 

joined together by single bonds into chains or rings, with hydrogen atoms attached to 

the  carbon  atoms.  Alkanes  with  four  or  more  carbon  atoms  can  exist  as  isomers, 

which  are  molecules  that  have  the  same  molecular  formula  but  different  structures 

and properties. 



Molecules and Ions 

Although atoms are the smallest unique unit of a particular element, in nature 

only  the  noble  gases  can  be  found  as  isolated  atoms.  Most  matter  is  in  the  form  of 

ions, or compounds. 

Molecules and chemical formulas 

A molecule is comprised of two or more chemically bonded atoms. The atoms 

may be of the same type of element, or they may be different. 

Many elements are found in nature in molecular form - two or more atoms (of 

the  same  type  of  element)  are  bonded  together.  Oxygen,  for  example,  is  most 

commonly  found  in  its  molecular  form  "O

2

"  (two  oxygen  atoms  chemically  bonded 



together). 

Oxygen  can  also  exist  in  another  molecular  form  where  three  atoms  are 

chemically  bonded.  O

3

  is  also  known  as  ozone.  Although  O



2

  and  O


3

  are  both 

compounds  of  oxygen,  they  are  quite  different  in  their  chemical  and  physical 

properties. There are seven elements which commonly occur as diatomic molecules. 

These include H, N, O, F, Cl, Br, I. 

An  example  of  a  commonly  occurring  compound  that  is  composed  of  two 



401 

different  types  of  atoms  is  pure  water,  or  "H

2

O".  The  chemical  formula  for  water 



illustrates the  method  of  describing  such compounds  in  atomic  terms:  there  are  two 

atoms  of  hydrogen  and  one  atom  of  oxygen  (the  "1"  subscript  is  omitted)  in  the 

compound known as "water". There is another compound of Hydrogen and Oxygen 

with the chemical formula H

2

O

2



 , also known as hydrogen peroxide. Again, although 

both compounds are composed of the same types of atoms, they are chemically quite 

different:  hydrogen  peroxide  is  quite  reactive  and  has  been  used  as  a  rocket  fuel  (it 

powered Evil Kenievel part way over the Snake River canyon). 



Most  molecular  compounds  (i.e.  involving  chemical  bonds)  contain  only 

non-metallic elements


1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал