Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет45/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   70

Electromagnetic waves 

Communications, antenna, radar, and microwave engineers must deal with the 

generation,  transmission,  and  reception  of  electromagnetic  waves.  Device  engineers 

working on ever-smaller integrated circuits and at ever higher frequencies must take 

into  account  wave  propagation  effects  at  the  chip  and  circuit-board  levels. 

Communication and computer network engineers routinely use waveguiding systems, 

such as transmission lines and optical fibers. Novel recent developments in materials, 

such  as  photonic  bandgap  structures,  omnidirectional  dielectric  mirrors,  birefringent 

multilayer films, surface plasmons, negative-index metamaterials, slow and fast light, 

promise a revolution in the control and manipulation of light and other applications. 

These are just some examples of topics discussed in this book. 

The book is organized around three main topic areas: 

 



The  propagation,  reflection,  and  transmission  of  plane  waves,  and  the 

analysis and design of multilayer films. 

 

Waveguiding  systems,  including  metallic,  dielectric,  and  surface 



387 

waveguides, transmission lines, impedance matching, and S-parameters. 

 

Linear  and  aperture  antennas,  scalar  and  vector  diffraction  theory,  plane-



wave spectrum, Fourier optics, superdirectivity and superresolution concepts, antenna 

array design, numerical methods in antennas, and coupled antennas. 

The  text  emphasizes  connections  to  other  subjects.  For  example,  the 

mathematical  techniques  for  analyzing  wave  propagation  in  multilayer  structures, 

multisegment  transmission  lines,  and  the  design  of  multilayer  optical  filters  are  the 

same  as  those  used  in  DSP,  such  as  the  lattice  structures  of  linear  prediction,  the 

analysis  and  synthesis  of  speech,  and  geophysical  signal  processing.  Similarly, 

antenna array design is related to the problem of spectral analysis of sinusoids and to 

digital filter design, and Butler beams are equivalent to the FFT. 

Electromagnetic  radiation  (EM  radiation  or  EMR)  is  the  radiant  energy 

released  by  certain  electromagneticprocesses.  Visible  light  is  an  electromagnetic 

radiation.  Other  familiar  electromagnetic  radiations  are  invisible  to  the  human  eye, 

such as radio waves, infrared light and X-rays. 

Classically,  electromagnetic  radiation  consists  of  electromagnetic  waves, 

which  are  synchronizedoscillations  of  electric  and  magnetic  fields  that  propagate  at 

the  speed  of  light  through  a  vacuum.  The  oscillations  of  the  two  fields  are 

perpendicular  to  each  other  and  perpendicular  to  the  direction  of  energy  andwave 

propagation, forming a transverse wave. Electromagnetic waves can be characterized 

by either thefrequency or wavelength of their oscillations to form the electromagnetic 

spectrum,  which  includes,  in  order  of  increasing  frequency  and  decreasing 

wavelength:  radio  waves,  microwaves,  infrared  radiation,  visible  light,ultraviolet 

radiation, X-rays and gamma rays. 

Electromagnetic  waves  are  produced  whenever  charged  particles  are 

accelerated,  and  these  waves  can  subsequently  interact  with  any  charged  particles. 

EM waves carry energy, momentum and angular momentum away from their source 

particle and can impart those quantities to matter with which they interact. Quanta of 

EM  waves  are  called  photons,  which  aremassless,  but  they  are  still  affected  by 

gravity. Electromagnetic radiation is associated with those EM waves that are free to 

propagate  themselves  ("radiate")  without  the  continuing  influence  of  the  moving 

charges  that  produced  them,  because  they  have  achieved  sufficient  distance  from 

those charges. Thus, EMR is sometimes referred to as the far field. In this language, 

the near fieldrefers to EM fields near the charges and current that directly produced 

them, specifically, electromagnetic induction and electrostatic induction phenomena. 

In  the  quantum  theory  of  electromagnetism,  EMR  consists  of  photons,  the 

elementary particles responsible for all electromagnetic interactions. Quantum effects 

provide  additional  sources  of  EMR,  such  as  the  transition  of  electrons  to  lower 

energy  levels  in  an  atom  and  black-body  radiation.  The  energy  of  an  individual 

photon is quantized and is greater for photons of higher frequency. This relationship 

is  given  by  Planck's  equation  E  =  h

ν,  where  E  is  the  energy  per  photon,  ν  is  the 

frequency of the photon, and h isPlanck's constant. A single gamma ray photon, for 

example, might carry ~100,000 times the energy of a single photon of visible light. 

The effects of EMR upon biological systems (and also to many other chemical 

systems,  under  standard  conditions)  depend  both  upon  the  radiation's  power  and  its 


388 

frequency. For EMR of visible frequencies or lower (i.e., radio, microwave, infrared), 

the  damage  done  to  cells  and  other  materials  is  determined  mainly  by  power  and 

caused  primarily  by  heating  effects  from  the  combined  energy  transfer  of  many 

photons. By contrast, for ultraviolet and higher frequencies (i.e., X-rays and gamma 

rays),  chemical  materials  and  living  cells  can  be  further  damaged  beyond  that  done 

by  simple  heating,  since  individual  photons  of  such  high  frequency  have  enough 

energy to cause direct molecular damage. 

 

5.Optics  

 

Geometrical optics 

Geometrical optics, or ray optics, describes light propagation in terms of rays. 

The ray in geometric optics is an abstraction, or instrument, useful in approximating 

the paths along which light propagates in certain classes of circumstances. 

The simplifying assumptions of geometrical optics include that light rays: 

- propagate in rectilinear paths as they travel in a homogeneous medium 

-  bend,  and  in  particular  circumstances  may  split  in  two,  at  the  interface 

between two dissimilar media 

- follow curved paths in a medium in which the refractive index changes 

- may be absorbed or reflected. 

Geometrical  optics  does  not  account  for  certain  optical  effects  such  as 

diffraction and interference. This simplification is useful in practice; it is an excellent 

approximation when the wavelength is small compared to the size of structures with 

which  the  light  interacts.  The  techniques  are  particularly  useful  in  describing 

geometrical aspects of imaging, including optical aberrations. 

A light ray is a line or curve that is perpendicular to the light's wavefronts (and 

is therefore collinear with the wave vector). 

A  slightly  more  rigorous  definition  of  a  light  ray  follows  from  Fermat's 

principle, which states that the path taken between two points by a ray of light is the 

path that can be traversed in the least time.

[1]

 

Geometrical  optics  is  often  simplified  by  making  the  paraxial  approximation, 



or  "small  angle  approximation."  The  mathematical  behavior  then  becomes  linear, 

allowing  optical  components  and  systems  to  be  described  by  simple  matrices.  This 

leads to the techniques ofGaussian optics and paraxial ray tracing, which are used to 

find  basic  properties  of  optical  systems,  such  as  approximate  image  and  object 

positions and magnifications.  

 

Wave optics 

A  slit  that  is  wider  than  a  single  wave  will  produce  interference-like  effects 

downstream  from  the  slit.  It  is  easier  to  understand  by  thinking  of  the  slit  not  as  a 

long slit, but as a number of point sources spaced evenly across the width of the slit. 

This can be seen in Figure 2 . 



389 

 

Single Slit Diffraction - Four Wavelengths 



This  figure  shows  single  slit  diffraction,  but  the  slit  is  the  length  of  4 

wavelengths. 

 

To  examine  this  effect  better,  lets  consider  a  single  monochromatic 



wavelength. This will produce a wavefront that is all in the same phase. Downstream 

from  the  slit,  the  light  at  any  given  point  is  made  up  of  contributions  from  each  of 

these  point  sources.  The  resulting  phase  differences  are  caused  by  the  different  in 

path lengths that the contributing portions of the rays traveled from the slit. 

The  variation  in  wave  intensity  can  be  mathematically  modeled.  From  the 

center of the slit, the diffracting waves propagate radially. The angle of the minimum 

intensity (

θ

min



) can be related to wavelength (

λ) and the slit's width (d) such that: 

dsin

⁡θmin=λ. 



The  intensity  (I)  of waves  at  any  angle  can  also be  calculated  as  a relation to 

slit width, wavelength and intensity of the original waves before passing through the 

slit: 

I(

θ)=I0(sin



⁡(πx)πx)2, 

where x is equal to: 

dλsin

⁡θ. 


 

6.Atomic physics 

 

Charged particles 

In physics, a charged particle is a particle with an electric charge. It may be 

an  ion,  such  as  a  molecule  or  atom  with  a  surplus  or  deficit  of  electrons  relative  to 

protons. It can be the electrons and protons themselves, as well as other elementary 

particles, like positrons. It may also be an atomic nucleus devoid of electrons, such as 

an alpha particle, ahelium nucleus. Neutrons have no charge, so they are not charged 

particles unless they are part of a positively charged nucleus. Plasmas are a collection 

of  charged  particles,  atomic  nuclei  and  separated  electrons,  but  can  also  be  a  gas 

containing  a  significant  proportion  of  charged  particles.  Plasma  is  called  the  fourth 

state of matter because its properties are quite different from solids, liquids and gases. 



1. Elastic scattering[edit] 

It  is  the  process  of  changing  in  direction  of  travelling  particle  due  to  the 

correlation with atom. Conservation of Energy is valid and momentum is preserved. 


390 

 

Rutherford scattering equation 



o  Coulomb’s  Force:  electrical  repulsive  force  is  acting  on 

α-particle  and 

nucleus. 

o Elastic collision: sum of momentum is conserved before and after. 

o Rutherford scattering equation 

2. Inelastic collision[edit] 

Inelastic  collision  takes  most  of  the  part  in  energy  loss  process  of  charged 

particle inside of the matter. 

 

Stopping power 



o Atom’s ionization caused by 

α-particle is called inelastic collision. 

α-particle loses momentum corresponding to ionization. 



o Stopping power: Energy loss due to per unit length particle in matter. It is a 

power that interrupts the progress of heavy particle in matter. 

 

Range equation R = Range, E = energy of heavy particle, S = stopping power 



o Linear Energy Transfer (LET): absolute value of stopping power. 

o Specific Ionization: the number of ion pairs produced per unit track length. 

o  Bragg  curve:  the graph  of  specific  energy  loss  along  the  track  of  a  charged 

particle. As it loses energy, stopping power value approximately increases along the 

1/E  then  stops.  Like  this,  the  peak  before  its  maximum  range  of  stopping  power 

called Bragg peak. 

o  Range:  distance  that  heavy  charged  particle  progressed  until  energy  is 

completely lost by repeating ionizing and scattering with atom. In case of the particle 

that has certain energy, gets certain range. Range is defined as a relation of strength 

of 


α-ray and distance. 

 

Quantum physic 

Quantum mechanics (QM; also known as quantum physics or quantum theory), 

including  quantum  field  theory,  is  a  fundamental  branch  of  physics  concerned  with 

processes  involving,  for  example,  atoms  and  photons.  Systems  such  as  these  which 

obey quantum mechanics can be in a quantum superposition of different states, unlike 

in classical physics. 

Quantum mechanics gradually arose from Max Planck's solution in 1900 to the 

black-body radiation problem (reported 1859) and Albert Einstein's 1905 paper which 

offered  a  quantum-based  theory  to  explain  the  photoelectric  effect  (reported 

1887).Early quantum theory was profoundly reconceived in the mid-1920s. 

The  reconceived  theory  is  formulated  in  various  specially  developed 



391 

mathematical  formalisms.  In  one  of  them,  a  mathematical  function,  the  wave 

function,  provides  information  about  the  probability  amplitude  of  position, 

momentum, and other physical properties of a particle. 

Important  applications  of  quantum  theory  include  superconducting  magnets, 

light-emitting  diodes  and  the  laser,  the  transistorand  semiconductors  such  as  the 

microprocessor,  medical  and  research  imaging  such  as  magnetic  resonance  imaging 

andelectron  microscopy,  and  explanations  for  many  biological  and  physical 

phenomena.  

Scientific  inquiry  into  the  wave  nature  of  light  began  in  the  17th  and  18th 

centuries,  when  scientists  such  as  Robert  Hooke,  Christiaan  Huygens  and  Leonhard 

Euler proposed a wave theory of light based on experimental observations.

[2]

 In 1803, 



Thomas  Young,  an English polymath,  performed  the  famous double-slit  experiment 

that  he  later  described  in  a  paper  titled  On  the  nature  of  light  and  colours.  This 

experiment played a major role in the general acceptance of the wave theory of light. 

In  1838,  Michael  Faraday  discovered  cathode  rays.  These  studies  were 

followed  by  the  1859  statement  of  the  black-body  radiationproblem  by  Gustav 

Kirchhoff,  the  1877  suggestion  by  Ludwig  Boltzmann  that  the  energy  states  of  a 

physical system can be discrete, and the 1900 quantum hypothesis of Max Planck.

[3]


 

Planck's  hypothesis  that  energy  is  radiated  and  absorbed  in  discrete  "quanta"  (or 

energy elements) precisely matched the observed patterns of black-body radiation. 

In  1896,  Wilhelm  Wien  empirically  determined  a  distribution  law  of  black-

body  radiation,

[4]


  known  as  Wien's  law  in  his  honor.  Ludwig  Boltzmann 

independently  arrived  at  this  result  by  considerations  of  Maxwell's  equations. 

However,  it  was  valid  only  at  high  frequencies  and  underestimated  the  radiance  at 

low  frequencies.  Later,  Planck  corrected  this  model  using  Boltzmann's  statistical 

interpretation  of  thermodynamics  and  proposed  what  is  now  called  Planck's  law, 

which led to the development of quantum mechanics. 

Following Max Planck's solution in 1900 to the black-body radiation problem 

(reported  1859),  Albert  Einstein  offered  a  quantum-based  theory  to  explain  the 

photoelectric effect(1905, reported 1887). Around 1900-1910, the atomic theory and 

the  corpuscular  theory  of  light

[5]

  first  came  to  be  widely  accepted  as  scientific  fact; 



these latter theories can be viewed as quantum theories of matter and electromagnetic 

radiation, respectively. 

Among the first to study quantum phenomena in nature were Arthur Compton, 

C.  V.  Raman,  and  Pieter  Zeeman,  each  of  whom  has  a  quantum  effect  named  after 

him.  Robert  Andrews  Millikan  studied  the  photoelectric  effect  experimentally,  and 

Albert Einstein developed a theory for it. At the same time, Niels Bohr developed his 

theory  of  the  atomic  structure,  which  was  later  confirmed  by  the  experiments  of 

Henry  Moseley.  In  1913,  Peter  Debye  extended  Niels  Bohr's  theory  of  atomic 

structure,  introducing  elliptical  orbits,  a  concept  also  introduced  by  Arnold 

Sommerfeld.

[6]

 This phase is known as old quantum theory. 



According to Planck, each energy element (E) is proportional to its frequency 

(

ν): 

 


392 

 

Max Planck is considered the father of the quantum theory. 



where h is Planck's constant. 

Planck  cautiously  insisted  that  this  was  simply  an  aspect  of  the  processes  of 

absorption and emission of radiation and had nothing to do with the physical reality 

of the radiation itself.

[7]

 In fact, he considered his quantum hypothesis a mathematical 



trick  to  get  the  right  answer  rather  than  a  sizable  discovery.

[8]


  However,  in  1905 

Albert  Einstein  interpreted  Planck's  quantum  hypothesis  realistically  and  used  it  to 

explain the photoelectric effect, in which shining light on certain materials can eject 

electrons from the material. He won the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics for this work. 

Einstein further developed this idea to show that an electromagnetic wave such 

as light could also be described as a particle (later called the photon), with a discrete 

quantum of energy that was dependent on its frequency.

[9]


 

 

The 1927 Solvay Conference in Brussels. 



The foundations of quantum mechanics were established during the first half of 

the 20th century by  Max Planck, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Louis de Broglie, 

Arthur Compton, Albert Einstein,Erwin Schrödinger, Max Born, John von Neumann, 

Paul  Dirac,  Enrico  Fermi,  Wolfgang  Pauli,  Max  von  Laue,  Freeman  Dyson,  David 

Hilbert,  Wilhelm  Wien,  Satyendra  Nath  Bose,  Arnold  Somerfield,  and  others.  The 

Copenhagen interpretation of Niels Bohr became widely accepted. 

In the mid-1920s, developments in quantum mechanics led to its becoming the 

standard  formulation  for  atomic  physics.  In  the  summer  of  1925,  Bohr  and 

Heisenberg published results that closed the old quantum theory. Out of deference to 

their particle-like behavior in certain processes and measurements, light quanta came 

to be called photons (1926). From Einstein's simple postulation was born a flurry of 

debating, theorizing, and testing. Thus, the entire field of quantum physics emerged, 

leading to its wider acceptance at the Fifth Solvay Conference in 1927.

[citation needed]

 

It  was  found  that  subatomic  particles  and  electromagnetic  waves  are  neither 



simply  particle  nor  wave  but  have  certain  properties  of  each.  This  originated  the 

concept of wave–particle duality.

[citation needed]

 

By  1930,  quantum  mechanics  had  been  further  unified  and  formalized  by  the 



work of David Hilbert, Paul Dirac and John von Neumann

[10]


 with greater emphasis 

393 

on measurement, the statistical nature of our knowledge of reality, and philosophical 

speculation  about  the  'observer'.  It  has  since  permeated  many  disciplines  including 

quantum  chemistry,  quantum  electronics,  quantum  optics,  and  quantum  information 

science.  Its  speculative  modern  developments  include  string  theory  and  quantum 

gravity theories. It also provides a useful framework for many features of the modern 

periodic  table  of  elements,  and  describes  the  behaviors  of  atoms  during  chemical 

bonding and the flow ofelectrons in computer semiconductors, and therefore plays a 

crucial role in many modern technologies.  

While  quantum  mechanics  was  constructed  to  describe  the  world  of  the  very 

small,  it  is  also  needed  to  explain  some  macroscopic  phenomena  such  as 

superconductors, andsuperfluids.  

The  word  quantum  derives  from  the  Latin,  meaning  "how  great"  or  "how 

much".


[13]

  In  quantum  mechanics,  it  refers  to  a  discrete  unit  assigned  to  certain 

physical quantities such as the energy of an atom at rest (see Figure 1). The discovery 

that  particles  are  discrete  packets  of  energy  with  wave-like  properties  led  to  the 

branch of physics dealing with atomic and subatomic systems which is today called 

quantum  mechanics.  It  underlies  the  mathematical  framework  of  many  fields  of 

physics  and  chemistry,  including  condensed  matter  physics,  solid-state  physics, 

atomic physics, molecular physics, computational physics, computational chemistry, 

quantum  chemistry,  particle  physics,  nuclear  chemistry,  and  nuclear  physics.  Some 

fundamental aspects of the theory are still actively studied.  

Quantum  mechanics  is  essential  to  understanding  the  behavior  of  systems  at 

atomic  length  scales  and  smaller.  If  the  physical  nature  of  an  atom  were  solely 

described byclassical mechanics, electrons would not orbit the nucleus, since orbiting 

electrons  emit  radiation  (due  to  circular  motion)  and  would  eventually  collide  with 

the  nucleus  due  to  this  loss  of  energy.  This  framework  was  unable  to  explain  the 

stability  of  atoms.  Instead,  electrons  remain  in  an  uncertain,  non-deterministic, 



smeared, probabilistic wave–particleorbital about the nucleus, defying the traditional 

assumptions of classical mechanics and electromagnetism.  

Quantum mechanics was initially developed to provide a better explanation and 

description  of  the  atom,  especially  the  differences  in  the  spectra  of  light  emitted  by 

differentisotopes  of  the  same  chemical  element,  as  well  as  subatomic  particles.  In 

short,  the  quantum-mechanical  atomic  model  has  succeeded  spectacularly  in  the 

realm where classical mechanics and electromagnetism falter. 



1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал