Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет44/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   ...   70

Theoretical astrophysics [edit] 

 

Stream lines on this simulation of a supernova show the flow of matter behind 



the shock wave giving clues as to the origin of pulsars 

380 

Theoretical astrophysicists use a wide variety of tools which include analytical 

models  (for  example,  boltropes  to  approximate  the  behaviors  of  a  star)  and 

computational numerical simulations. Each has some advantages. Analytical models 

of a process are generally better for giving insight into the heart of what is going on. 

Numerical  models  can  reveal  the  existence  of  phenomena  and  effects  that  would 

otherwise not be seen.

[25][26]


 

Theorists in  astrophysics endeavor to  create theoretical  models  and  figure out 

the observational  consequences of  those models.  This helps  allow observers  to look 

for  data  that  can  refute  a  model  or  help  in  choosing  between  several  alternate  or 

conflicting models. 

Theorists also try to generate or modify models to take into account new data. 

In  the  case  of  an  inconsistency,  the  general  tendency  is  to  try  to  make  minimal 

modifications  to  the  model  to  fit  the  data.  In  some  cases,  a  large  amount  of 

inconsistent data over time may lead to total abandonment of a model. 

Topics  studied  by  theoretical  astrophysicists  include:  stellar  dynamics  and 

evolution;  galaxy  formation  and  evolution;  magnetohydrodynamics;  large-scale 

structure  of  matter  in  the  universe;  origin  of  cosmic  rays;  general  relativity  and 

physical  cosmology,  including  string  cosmology  and  astroparticle  physics. 

Astrophysical  relativity  serves  as  a  tool  to  gauge  the  properties  of  large  scale 

structures  for  which  gravitation  plays  a  significant  role  in  physical  phenomena 

investigated  and  as  the  basis  for  black  hole  (astro)physics  and  the  study  of 

gravitational waves. 

Some  widely  accepted  and  studied  theories  and  models  in  astrophysics,  now 

included in the Lambda-CDM model, are the Big Bang, cosmic inflation, dark matter, 

dark  energy  and  fundamental  theories  of  physics.  Wormholes  are  examples  of 

hypotheses which are yet to be proven (or disproven). 

 

Reading 



1.

 

Physical measurements 

 

Physical quantities 

Measurement is the assignment of a number to a characteristic of an object or 

event,  which  can  be  compared  with  other  objects  or  events.

[1][2]

  The  scope  and 



application  of  a  measurement  is  dependent  on  the  context  and  discipline.  In  the 

natural sciences and engineering, measurements do not apply to nominal properties of 

objects  or  events,  which  is  consistent  with  the  guidelines  of  the  International 

vocabulary  of  metrology  published  by  the  International  Bureau  of  Weights  and 

Measures.

[2]

  However,  in  other  fields  such  asstatistics  as  well  as  the  social  and 



behavioral  sciences,  measurements  can  have  multiple  levels,  which  would  include 

nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio scales.

[1][3]

 

Measurement  is  a  cornerstone  of  trade,  science,  technology,  and  quantitative 



research in many disciplines. Historically, many measurement systems existed for the 

varied fields of human existence to facilitate comparisons in these fields. Often these 

were  achieved  by  local  agreements  between  trading  partners  or  collaborators.  Since 

the  18th  century,  developments  progressed  towards  unifying,  widely  accepted 



381 

standards that resulted in the modern International System of Units (SI). This system 

reduces  all  physical  measurements  to  a  mathematical  combination  of  seven  base 

units. The science of measurement is pursued in the field of metrology. 

 

Physical quantities 

Most physical quantities include  a  unit, but not  all – some  are  dimensionless. 

Neither the name of a physical quantity, nor the symbol used to denote it, implies a 

particular choice of unit, though SI units are usually preferred and assumed today due 

to their ease of use and all-round applicability. For example, a quantity of mass might 

be  represented  by  the  symbol  m,  and  could  be  expressed  in  the  units  kilograms 

(kg),pounds (lb), or daltons (Da). 

The  notion  of  physical  dimension  of  a  physical  quantity  was  introduced  by 

Joseph  Fourier  in  1822.

[2]


  By  convention,  physical  quantities  are  organized  in  a 

dimensional  system  built  upon  base  quantities,  each  of  which  is  regarded  as  having 

its own dimension. 

 

2.Mechanics 



 

Kinematics 

Kinematics is the branch of classical mechanics which describes the motion of 

points  (alternatively  "particles"),  bodies  (objects),  and  systems  of  bodies  without 

consideration of the masses of those objects nor the forces that may have caused the 

motion.


[1][2][3]

 Kinematics as a field of study is often referred to as the "geometry of 

motion"  and  as  such  may  be  seen  as  a  branch  of  mathematics.

[4][5][6]

  Kinematics 

begins with a description of the geometry of the system and the initial conditions of 

known values of the position, velocity and or acceleration of various points that are a 

part of the system, then from geometrical arguments it can determine the position, the 

velocity and the acceleration of any part of the system. The study of the influence of 

forces  acting  on  masses  falls  within  the  purview  of  kinetics.  For  further  details, 

seeanalytical dynamics. 

 

Dynamics 



Dynamics  is  a  branch  of  applied  mathematics  (specifically  classical 

mechanics) concerned with the study of forces and torques and their effect on motion, 

as opposed to kinematics, which studies the motion of objects without reference to its 

causes. Isaac Newtondefined the fundamental physical laws which govern dynamics 

in physics, especially his second law of motion. 

Generally  speaking,  researchers  involved  in  dynamics  study  how  a  physical 

system  might  develop  or  alter  over  time  and  study  the  causes  of  those  changes.  In 

addition, Newton established the fundamental physical laws which govern dynamics 

in  physics.  By  studying  his  system  of  mechanics,  dynamics  can  be  understood.  In 

particular,  dynamics  is  mostly  related  to  Newton's  second  law  of  motion.  However, 

all three laws of motion are taken into account because these are interrelated in any 

given observation or experiment 

 


382 

a.

 

Conservation law 

Conservation laws are fundamental to our understanding of the physical world, 

in that they describe which processes can or cannot occur in nature. For example, the 

conservation  law  of  energy  states  that  the  total  quantity  of  energy  in  an  isolated 

system does not change, though it may change form. In general, the total quantity of 

the  property  governed  by  that  law  remains  unchanged  during  physical  processes. 

With respect to classical physics, conservation laws include conservation of energy, 

mass  (or  matter),  linear  momentum,  angular  momentum,  and  electric  charge.  With 

respect  to  particle  physics,  particles  cannot  be  created  or  destroyed  except  in  pairs, 

where one is ordinary and the other is an antiparticle. With respect to symmetries and 

invariance principles, three special conservation laws have been described, associated 

with inversion or reversal of space, time, and charge. 

Conservation laws are considered to be fundamental laws of nature, with broad 

application in physics, as well as in other fields such as chemistry, biology, geology, 

and engineering. 

Most conservation laws are exact, or absolute, in the sense that they apply to all 

possible  processes.  Some  conservation  laws  are  partial,  in  that  they  hold  for  some 

processes but not for others. 

One  particularly  important  result  concerning  conservation  laws  is  Noether's 

theorem, which states that there is a one-to-one correspondence between each one of 

them and a differentiable symmetry in the system. For example, the conservation of 

energy  follows  from  the  time-invariance  of  physical  systems,  and  the  fact  that 

physical systems behave the same regardless of how they are oriented in space gives 

rise to the conservation of angular momentum. 

 

b.

 

Oscillation and Wave 

Oscillation is the repetitive variation, typically in time, of some measure about 

a central value (often a point of equilibrium) or between two or more different states. 

The  term  vibration  is  precisely  used  to  describe  mechanical  oscillation.  Familiar 

examples of oscillation include a swingingpendulum and alternating current power. 

Oscillations occur not only in mechanical systems but also in dynamic systems 

in  virtually  every  area  of  science:  for  example  the  beating  human  heart,  business 

cycles in economics, predator–prey population cycles in ecology, geothermal geysers 

in geology, vibrating strings in musical instruments, periodic firing of nerve cells in 

the brain, and the periodic swelling of Cepheid variable stars in astronomy. 

The  simplest  mechanical  oscillating  system  is  a  weight  attached  to  a  linear 

spring subject to only weight and tension. Such a system may be approximated on an 

air table or ice surface. The system is in an equilibrium state when the spring is static. 

If the system is displaced from the equilibrium, there is a net restoring force on the 

mass, tending to bring it back to equilibrium. However, in moving the mass back to 

the  equilibrium  position,  it  has  acquired  momentum  which  keeps  it  moving  beyond 

that  position,  establishing  a  new  restoring  force  in  the  opposite  sense.  If  a  constant 

force such as gravity is added to the system, the point of equilibrium is shifted. The 

time taken for an oscillation to occur is often referred to as the oscillatory period

Systems  where  the  restoring  force  on  a  body  is  directly  proportional  to  its 


383 

displacement,  such  as  the  dynamics  of  the  spring-mass  system,  are  described 

mathematically  by  thesimple  harmonic  oscillator  and  the  regular  periodic  motion  is 

known  as  simple  harmonic  motion.  In  the  spring-mass  system,  oscillations  occur 

because, at the static equilibrium displacement, the mass has kinetic energy which is 

converted  into  potential  energy  stored  in  the  spring  at  the  extremes  of  its  path.  The 

spring-mass  system  illustrates  some  common  features  of  oscillation,  namely  the 

existence  of  an  equilibrium  and  the  presence  of  a  restoring  force  which  grows 

stronger the further the system deviates from equilibrium. 

In  physics,  a  wave  is  an  oscillation  accompanied  by  a  transfer  of  energy  that 

travels  through  medium  (space  or  mass).  Frequency  refers  to  the  addition  of  time. 

Wave  motiontransfers energy from one point to another, which displace particles of 

the transmission medium — that is, with little or no associated mass transport. Waves 

consist,  instead,  ofoscillations  or  vibrations  (of  a  physical  quantity),  around  almost 

fixed locations. 

There  are  two  main  types  of  waves.  Mechanical  waves  propagate  through  a 

medium,  and  the  substance  of  this  medium  is  deformed.  The  deformation  reverses 

itself  owing  torestoring  forces  resulting  from  its  deformation.  For  example,  sound 

waves propagate via air molecules colliding with their neighbors. When air molecules 

collide,  they  also  bounce  away  from  each  other  (a  restoring  force).  This  keeps  the 

molecules from continuing to travel in the direction of the wave. 

The  second  main  type  of  wave,  electromagnetic  waves,  do  not  require  a 

medium. Instead, they consist of periodic oscillations of electrical and magnetic fields 

originally generated by charged particles, and can therefore travel through a vacuum. 

These  types  of  waves  vary  in  wavelength,  and  include  radio  waves,  microwaves, 

infrared radiation, visible light,ultraviolet radiation, X-rays, and gamma rays. 

Waves  are  described  by  a  wave  equation  which  sets  out  how  the  disturbance 

proceeds over time. The mathematical form of this equation varies depending on the 

type of wave. Further, the behavior of particles in quantum mechanics are described 

by  waves.  In  addition,  gravitational  waves  also  travel  through  space,  which  are  a 

result of a vibration or movement in gravitational fields. 

A  wave  can  be  transverse  or  longitudinal.  Transverse  waves  occur  when  a 

disturbance  creates  oscillations  that  are  perpendicular  to  the  propagation  of  energy 

transfer. Longitudinal waves occur when the oscillations are parallel to the direction 

of  energy  propagation.  While  mechanical  waves  can  be  both  transverse  and 

longitudinal, all electromagnetic waves are transverse in free space. 

 

3.Thermal Physics 

 

Molecular  physics  is  the  study  of  the  physical  properties  of  molecules,  the 

chemical bonds between atoms as well as the molecular dynamics. Its most important 

experimental techniques are the various types of spectroscopy; scattering is also used. 

The  field  is  closely  related  to  atomic  physics  and  overlaps  greatly  with  theoretical 

chemistry, physical chemistry and chemical physics. 

Additionally  to  the  electronic  excitation  states  which  are  known  from  atoms, 

molecules  are  able  to  rotate  and  to  vibrate.  These  rotations  and  vibrations  are 


384 

quantized,  there  are  discrete  energy  levels.  The  smallest  energy  differences  exist 

between  different  rotational  states,  therefore  pure  rotational  spectra  are  in  the  far 

infrared  region  (about  30  -  150  µmwavelength)  of  the  electromagnetic  spectrum. 

Vibrational  spectra  are  in  the  near  infrared  (about  1  -  5  µm)  and  spectra  resulting 

from  electronic  transitions  are  mostly  in  the  visible  and  ultraviolet  regions.  From 

measuring rotational and vibrational spectra properties of molecules like the distance 

between the nuclei can be calculated. 

One  important  aspect  of  molecular  physics  is  that  the  essential  atomic  orbital 

theory in the field of atomic physics expands to the molecular orbital theory. 

Molecular  modelling  encompasses  all  theoretical  methods  and  computational 

techniques  used  tomodel  or  mimic  the  behaviour  of  molecules.  The  techniques  are 

used  in  the  fields  of  computational  chemistry,  drug  design,  computational  biology 

and  materials  science  for  studying  molecular  systems  ranging  from  small  chemical 

systems  to  large  biological  molecules  and  material  assemblies.  The  simplest 

calculations  can  be  performed  by  hand,  but  inevitably  computers  are  required  to 

perform molecular modelling of any reasonably sized system. The common feature of 

molecular  modelling  techniques  is  the  atomistic  level  description  of  the  molecular 

systems.  This  may  include  treating  atoms  as  the  smallest  individual  unit  (the 

Molecular  mechanics  approach),  or  explicitly  modeling  electrons  of  each  atom 

(thequantum chemistry approach). 

 

Thermodynamics 

Thermodynamics  is  the  branch  of  science  concerned  with  heat  and 

temperature and their relation to energy and work. It states that the behavior of these 

quantities  is  governed  by  the  four  laws  of  thermodynamics,  irrespective  of  the 

composition or specific properties of the material or system in question. The laws of 

thermodynamics  are  explained  in  terms  of  microscopic  constituents  by  statistical 

mechanics.  Thermodynamics  applies  to  a  wide  variety  of  topics  in  science  and 

engineering,  especially  physical  chemistry,  chemical  engineering  and  mechanical 

engineering. 

Historically,  thermodynamics  developed  out  of  a  desire  to  increase  the 

efficiency  of  early  steam  engines,  particularly  through the  work  of  French  physicist 

Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot (1824) who believed that engine efficiency was the key 

that  could  help  France  win  the  Napoleonic  Wars.

[1]

  Scottish  physicist  Lord  Kelvin 



was the first to formulate a concise definition of thermodynamics in 1854:

[2]


 

Thermo-dynamics is the subject of the relation of heat to forces acting between 

contiguous parts of bodies, and the relation of heat to electrical agency. 

The  initial  application  of  thermodynamics  to  mechanical  heat  engines  was 

extended  early  on  to  the  study  of  chemical  systems.  Chemical  thermodynamics 

studies  the  nature  of  the  role  ofentropy  in  the  process  of  chemical  reactions  and 

provided the bulk of expansion and knowledge of the field.

[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

 Other 

formulations  of  thermodynamics  emerged  in  the  following  decades.  Statistical 



thermodynamics, or statistical mechanics, concerned itself withstatistical predictions 

of  the  collective  motion  of  particles  from  their  microscopic  behavior.  In  1909, 

Constantin Carathéodory presented a purely mathematical approach to the field in his 


385 

axiomatic  formulation  of  thermodynamics,  a  description  often  referred  to  as 



geometrical thermodynamics

 

4. Electromagnetic oscillations 



 

The  electromagnetic  wave  equation  is  a  second-order  partial  differential 

equation that describes the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a medium 

or in a vacuum. It is a three-dimensional form of the wave equation.  

In  his  1865  paper  titled  A  Dynamical  Theory  of  the  Electromagnetic  Field, 

Maxwell utilized the correction to Ampère's circuital law that he had made in part III 

of  his  1861  paper  On  Physical  Lines  of  Force.  In  Part  VI  of  his  1864  paper  titled 

Electromagnetic  Theory  of  Light,

[2]


  Maxwell  combined  displacement  current  with 

some  of  the  other  equations  of  electromagnetism  and  he  obtained  a  wave  equation 

with a speed equal to the speed of light. He commented: 

The  agreement  of  the  results  seems  to  show  that  light  and  magnetism  are 

affections  of  the  same  substance,  and  that  light  is  an  electromagnetic  disturbance 

propagated through the field according to electromagnetic laws.

[3]


 

Maxwell's  derivation  of  the  electromagnetic  wave  equation has  been  replaced 

in  modern  physics  education  by  a  much  less  cumbersome  method  involving 

combining  the  corrected  version  of  Ampère's  circuital  law  with  Faraday's  law  of 

induction. 

 

Alternating current 



Alternating current (AC), is an electric current in which the flow of electric 

charge  periodically  reverses  direction,  whereas  in  direct  current  (DC,  also  dc),  the 

flow  of  electric  charge  is  only  in  one  direction.  The  abbreviations  AC  and  DC  are 

often  used  to  mean  simplyalternating  and  direct,  as  when  they  modify  current  or 

voltage.

[1][2]


 

AC  is  the  form  in  which  electric  power  is  delivered  to  businesses  and 

residences. The usual waveform of alternating current in most electric power circuits 

is  a  sine  wave.  In  certain  applications,  different  waveforms  are  used,  such  as 

triangular or square waves. 

Audio  and  radio  signals  carried  on  electrical  wires  are  also  examples  of 

alternating current. These types of alternating current carry information encoded (or 

modulated)  onto  the  AC  signal,  such  as  sound  (audio)  or  images  (video).  These 

currents  typically  alternate  at  higher  frequencies  than  those  used  in  power 

transmission. 

Electric power is distributed as alternating current because AC voltage may be 

increased  or  decreased  with  a  transformer.  This  allows  the  power  to  be  transmitted 

through power lines efficiently at high voltage, which reduces the power lost as heat 

due to resistance of the wire, and transformed to a lower, safer, voltage for use. Use 

of  a  higher  voltageleads  to  significantly  more  efficient  transmission  of  power.  The 

power losses (

) in a conductor are a product of the square of the current (I) and 

the resistance (R) of the conductor, described by the formula 



386 

 

This means that when transmitting a fixed power on a given wire, if the current 



is halved (i.e. the voltage is doubled), the power loss will be four times less. 

The  power  transmitted  is  equal  to  the  product  of  the  current  and  the  voltage 

(assuming no phase difference); that is, 

 

Consequently,  power  transmitted  at  a  higher  voltage  requires  less  loss-



producing  current  than  for  the  same  power  at  a  lower  voltage.  Power  is  often 

transmitted at hundreds of kilovolts, and transformed to 100–240 volts for domestic 

use. 

 

High  voltage  transmission  lines  deliver  power  from  electric  generationplants 



over  long  distances  using  alternating  current.  These  particular  lines  are  located  in 

eastern Utah. 

High voltages have disadvantages, the main one being the increased insulation 

required,  and  generally  increased  difficulty  in  their  safe  handling.  In  a  power  plant, 

power  is  generated  at  a  convenient  voltage  for  the  design  of  a  generator,  and  then 

stepped  up  to  a  high  voltage  for  transmission.  Near  the  loads,  the  transmission 

voltage is stepped down to the voltages used by equipment. Consumer voltages vary 

depending on the country and size of load, but generally motors and lighting are built 

to use up to a few hundred volts between phases. 

 



1   ...   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал