Сборник текстов на казахском, русском, английском



жүктеу 6.69 Mb.

бет37/70
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі6.69 Mb.
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   70

 

Defense in-depth 

 

 Information  security  must protect information  throughout  the life  span  of  the 

information,  from  the  initial  creation  of  the  information  on  through  to  the  final 

disposal of the information. The information must be protected while in motion and 

while  at  rest.  During  its  lifetime,  information  may  pass  through  many  different 

information  processing  systems  and  through  many  different  parts  of  information 

processing systems.  There are many different ways the information and information 

systems can be threatened. To fully protect the information during its lifetime, each 

component  of  the  information  processing  system  must  have  its  own  protection 

mechanisms. The building up, layering2 on and overlapping3 of security measures is 

called defense in depth. The strength of any system is no greater than its weakest link. 

Using a defence in-depth strategy, should one defensive measure fail, there are other 

defensive measures in place that continue to provide protection.  

The  three  types  of  the  above  mentioned  controls  (administrative,  logical,  and 

physical)  can  be  used  to  form  the  basis  upon  which  to  build  a  defense-in-depth 

strategy. With this approach, defense-in-depth can be conceptualized as three distinct 

layers or planes laid one on top of the other. Additional insight into defense-in- depth 

can be gained by thinking of it as forming the layers of an onion, with data at the core 

of the onion, people the next outer layer of the onion, and network security, hostbased 

security  and  application  security  forming  the  outermost  layers  of  the  onion.  Both 

perspectives  are  equally  valid  and  each  provides  valuable  insight  into  the 


327 

implementation  of  a  good  defense-in-depth  strategy.  26  Security  classification  for 

information.  An  important  aspect  of  information  security  and  risk  management  is 

recognizing  the  value  of  information  and  defining  appropriate  procedures  and 

protection  requirements  for  the information.  Not  all information is equal  and so not 

all  information  requires  the  same  degree  of  protection.  This  requires  information  to 

be assigned a security classification.  

The  first  step  in  information  classification  is  to  identify  a  member  of  senior 

management as the owner of the particular information to be classified. Next, develop 

a classification policy. The policy should describe the different classification labels, 

define  the  criteria  for  information  to  be  assigned  a  particular  label,  and  list  the 

required security controls for each classification.  

Some  factors  that  influence  which  classification  information  should  be 

assigned include  how  much  value  that  information  has to the organization,  how  old 

the information is and whether or not the information has become obsolete. Laws and 

other  regulatory  requirements  are  also  important  considerations  when  classifying 

information.  

The  type  of  information  security  classification  labels  selected  and  used  will 

depend on the nature of the organization, with examples being:  

In the business sector, labels such as: Public, Sensitive, Private, Confidential.  

In  the  government  sector,  labels  such  as:  Unclassified,  Sensitive  But 

Unclassified,  Restricted,  Confidential,  Secret,  Top  Secret  and  their  non-English 

equivalents. 

 In  cross-sectoral  formations,  the  Traffic  Light  Protocol,  which  consists  of: 

White, Green, Amber and Red. All employees in the organization, as well as business 

partners,  must  be  trained  on  the  classification  schema  and  understand  the  required 

security controls and handling procedures for each classification. The classification of 

a  particular  information  asset  has  been  assigned  should  be  reviewed  periodically  to 

ensure  the  classification  is  still  appropriate  for  the  information  and  to  ensure  the 

security controls required by the classification are in place.  

Access  control.  Access  to  protected  information  must  be  restricted  to  people 

who are authorized to access the information. The computer programs, and in many 

cases  the  computers  that  process  the  information,  must  also  be  authorized.  This 

requires  that  mechanisms  be  in place  to control  the  access to protected information. 

The  sophistication  of  the  access  control  mechanisms  should  be  in  parity  with  the 

value  of  the  information  being  protected  –  the  more  sensitive  or  valuable  the 

information  the  stronger  the  control  mechanisms  need  to  be.  The  foundation,  on 

which  access  control  mechanisms  are  built,  start  with  identification4  and 

authentication5 .  

Identification  is  an  assertion  of  who  someone  is  or  what  something  is.  If  a 

person makes the statement "Hello, my name is John Doe" they are making a claim of 

who they are. However, their claim may or may not be true. Before John Doe can be 

granted access to protected information it will be necessary to verify that the person 

claiming to be John Doe really is John Doe. 27  

Authentication is the act of verifying a claim of identity. When John Doe goes 

into a bank to make a withdrawal, he tells the bank teller he is John Doe (a claim of 



328 

identity).  The  bank  teller  asks  to  see  a  photo  ID,  so  he  hands  the  teller  his  driver's 

license. The bank teller checks the license to make sure it has John Doe printed on it 

and  compares  the  photograph  on  the  license  against  the  person  claiming  to  be  John 

Doe.  If  the  photo  and  name  match  the  person,  then  the  teller  has  authenticated  that 

John Doe is who he claimed to be.  

There  are  three  different  types  of  information  that  can  be  used  for 

authentication:  something  you  know,  something  you  have,  or  something  you  are. 

Examples of something you know include such things as a PIN, a password, or your 

mother's maiden name. Examples of something you have include a driver's license or 

a  magnetic  Something  you  are  refers  to  biometrics.  Examples of  biometrics  include 

palm  prints,  finger  prints,  voice  prints  and  retina  (eye)  scans.  Strong  authentication 

requires providing information from two of the three different types of authentication 

information.  For  example,  something  you  know  plus  something  you  have.  This  is 

called two factor authentication.  

On computer systems in use today, the Username is the most common form of 

identification  and  the  Password  is  the  most  common  form  of  authentication. 

Usernames  and  passwords  have  served  their  purpose  but  in  our  modern  world  they 

are  no  longer  adequate.  Usernames  and  passwords  are  slowly  being  replaced  with 

more sophisticated authentication mechanisms.  

After  a  person,  program  or  computer  has  successfully  been  identified  and 

authenticated  then  it  must  be  determined  what  informational  resources  they  are 

permitted  to  access  and  what  actions  they  will  be  allowed  to  perform  (run,  view, 

create, delete, or change). This is called authorization6 . 

 Authorization to access information and other computing services begins with 

administrative  policies  and  procedures.  The policies prescribe what information  and 

computing  services  can  be  accessed,  by  whom,  and  under  what  conditions.  The 

access control mechanisms are then configured to enforce these policies.  

Different  computing  systems  are  equipped  with  different  kinds  of  access 

control  mechanisms  -  some  may  even  offer  a  choice  of  different  access  control 

mechanisms. The access control mechanism a system offers will be based upon one 

of three approaches to access control or it may be derived from a combination of the 

three approaches.  

The  non-discretionary7  approach  consolidates  all  access  control  under  a 

centralized  administration.  The  access  to  information  and  other  resources  is  usually 

based on the individuals function (role) in the organization or the tasks the individual 

must  perform.  The  discretionary8  approach  gives  the  creator  or  owner  of  the 

information resource the ability to control access to those resources. In the Mandatory 

access  control9  approach,  access  is  granted  or  denied  basing  upon  the  security 

classification assigned to the information resource.  



 

Digital mapping 

 

Digital  mapping  (also  called  digital  cartography)  is  the  process  by  which  a 

collection  of  data  is  compiled  and  formatted  into  a  virtual  image.  The  primary 

function of this technology is to produce maps that give accurate representations of a 



329 

particular  area,  detailing  major  road  arteries  and  other  points  of  interest.  The 

technology also allows the calculation of distances from one place to another. Though 

digital  mapping  can be found  in a variety  of  computer  applications, such  as  Google 

50 Earth, the main use of these maps is with the Global Positioning System, or GPS 

satellite network, used in standard automotive navigation systems. 

 History. The roots of digital mapping lie within traditional paper maps. Paper 

maps  provide  basic  landscapes  similar  to  digitized  road  maps,  yet  are  often 

cumbersome,  cover  only  a  designated  area,  and  lack  many  specific  details  such  as 

road blocks. In addition, there is no way to “update” a paper map except to obtain a 

new version. On the other hand, digital maps, in many cases, can be updated through 

synchronization with updates from company servers. Early digital maps had the same 

basic  functionality  as  paper  maps  –  that  is,  they  provided  a  “virtual  view”  of  roads 

generally  outlined  by  the  terrain  encompassing  the  surrounding  area.  However,  as 

digital  maps  have grown  with  the  expansion  of  GPS  technology  in  the  past  decade, 

live  traffic  updates,  points  of  interest  and  service  locations  have  been  added  to 

enhance  digital  maps  to  be  more  “user  conscious”.  Traditional  “virtual  views”  are 

now  only  part  of  digital  mapping.  In  many  cases,  users  can  choose  between  virtual 

maps,  satellite  (aerial  views),  and  hybrid  (a  combination  of  virtual  map  and  aerial 

views) views. With the ability to update and expand digital mapping devices, newly 

constructed roads and places can be added to appear on maps. 

Data Collection. Digital maps heavily rely upon a vast amount of data collected 

over  time.  Most of the  information that  comprise digital  maps  is the  culmination of 

satellite  imagery1  as  well  as  street  level  information.  Maps  must  be  updated 

frequently  to  provide  users  with  the  most  accurate  reflection  of  a  location.  While 

there  is  a  wide  spectrum  on  companies  that  specialize  in  digital  mapping,  the  basic 

premise  is  that  digital  maps  will  accurately  portray  roads  as  they  actually  appear  to 

give "life-like experiences2 ". 

 Functionality  and  Use.  Computer  programs  and  applications  such  as  Google 

Earth  and  Google  Maps  provide  map  views  from  space  and  street  level  of  much  of 

the world. Used primarily for recreational use, Google Earth provides digital mapping 

in  personal  applications,  such  as  tracking  distances  or  finding  locations.  The 

development  of  mobile  computing  (tablet  PCs3  ,  laptops,  etc.)  has  recently  (since 

about 2000) spurred the use of digital mapping in the sciences and applied sciences. 

As  of  2009,  science  fields  that  use  digital  mapping  technology  include  geology, 

engineering,  architecture,  land  surveying,  mining,  forestry,  environment,  and 

archaeology.  The  principal  use  by  which  digital  mapping  has  grown  in  the  past 

decade has been its connection to Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. GPS 

is  the  foundation  behind  digital  mapping  navigation  systems.  The  coordinates  and 

position  as  well  as  atomic  time  obtained  by  a  terrestrial  GPS  receiver  from  GPS 

satellites  orbiting  the  Earth  interact  together  to  provide  the  digital  mapping 

programming  with  points  of  origin  in  addition  to  the  destination  points  needed  to 

calculate  distance.  This  information  is  then  analyzed  and  compiled  to  create  a  map 

that  provides  the  easiest  and  most  efficient  way  to  reach  a  destination.  More 

technically  speaking,  the  device  operates  in  the  following  manner:  GPS  receivers 

collect data from "at least twenty-four GPS satellites" orbiting the Earth, calculating 



330 

position in three dimensions.  

1. The GPS receiver then utilizes position to provide GPS coordinates, or exact 

points of latitudinal and longitudinal direction from GPS satellites.  

2. The points, or coordinates, output an accurate range between approximately 

"10-20 meters" of the actual location.  

3.  The  beginning  point,  entered  via  GPS  coordinates,  and  the  ending  point, 

(address or coordinates) input by the user, are then entered into the digital map. 

 4.  The  map  outputs  a  real-time  visual  representation  of  the  route.  The  map 

then moves along the path of the driver.  

5. If the driver drifts from the designated route, the navigation system will use 

the current coordinates to recalculate a route to the destination location. 

 

Computers 

 

Generally, any device that can perform numerical calculations, even an adding 

machine,  may  be  called  a  computer  but  nowadays  this  term  is  used  especially  for 

digital computers. Computers that once weighed 30 tons now may weigh as little as 

1.8 kilograms. Microchips and microprocessors have considerably reduced the cost of 

the  electronic  components  required  in  a  computer.  Computers  come  in  many  sizes 

and shapes such as special-purpose, laptop, desktop, minicomputers, supercomputers. 

Special-purpose computers can perform specific tasks and their operations are 

limited to the programmes built into their microchips. There computers are the basis 

for  electronic  calculators  and  can  be  found  in  thousands  of  electronic  products, 

including  digital  watches  and  automobiles.  Basically,  these  computers  do  the 

ordinary  arithmetic  operations  such  as  addition,  subtraction,  multiplication  and 

division. 

General-purpose  computers  are  much  more  powerful  because  they  can  accept 

new  sets  of  instructions.  The  smallest  fully  functional  computers  are  called  laptop 

computers.  Most  of  the  general-purpose  computers  known  as  personal  or  desktop 

computers can perform almost 5 million operations per second. 

Today's  personal  computers  are  known  to  be  used  for  different  purposes:  for 

testing new theories or models that cannot be examined with experiments, as valuable 

educational tools due to various encyclopedias, dictionaries, educational programmes, 

in  book-keeping,  accounting  and  management.  Proper  application  of  computing 

equipment  in  different  industries  is  likely  to  result  in  proper  management,  effective 

distribution of materials and resources, more efficient production and trade. 

Minicomputers  are  high-speed  computers  that  have  greater  data  manipulating 

capabilities than personal computers do and that can be used simultaneously by many 

users.  These  machines  are  primarily  used  by  larger  businesses  or  by  large  research 

and university centers. The speed and power of supercomputers, the highest class of 

computers,  are  almost  beyond  comprehension,  and  their  capabilities  are  continually 

being improved. The most complex of these machines can perform nearly 32 billion 

calculations per second and store 1 billion characters in memory at one time, and can 

do  in  one  hour  what  a  desktop  computer  would  take  40  years  to  do.  They  are  used 

commonly  by  government  agencies  and  large  research  centers.  Linking  together 



331 

networks of several small computer centers and programming them to use a common 

language  has  enabled  engineers  to  create  the  supercomputer.  The  aim  of  this 

technology  is  to  elaborate  a  machine  that  could  perform  a  trillion  calculations  per 

second. 

  

Digital computers 



 

There are two fundamentally different types of computers: analog and digital. 

The  former  type  solver  problems  by  using  continuously  changing  data  such  as 

voltage.  In  current  usage,  the  term  "computer"  usually  refers  to  high-speed  digital 

computers.  These  computers  are  playing  an  increasing  role  in  all  branches  of  the 

economy. 

Digital  computers  based  on  manipulating  discrete  binary  digits  (1s  and  0s). 

They are generally  more effective than analog computers for four principal reasons: 

they  are  faster;  they  are  not  so  susceptible  to  signal  interference;  they  can  transfer 

huge data bases more accurately; and their coded binary data are easier to store and 

retrieve than the analog signals. 

For all their apparent complexity, digital computers are considered to be simple 

machines.  Digital  computers  are  able  to  recognize  only  two  states  in  each  of  its 

millions  of  switches,  "on"  or  "off",  or  high  voltage  or  low  voltage.  By  assigning 

binary numbers to there states, 1 for "on" and 0 for "off", and linking many switches 

together,  a  computer  can  represent  any  type  of  data  from  numbers  to  letters  and 

musical notes. It is this process of recognizing signals that is known as digitization. 

The real power of a computer depends on the speed with which it checks switches per 

second.  The  more  switches  a  computer  checks  in  each  cycle,  the  more  data  it  can 

recognize at one time and the faster it can operate, each switch being called a binary 

digit or bit. 

A digital computer is a complex system of four functionally different elements: 

1)  the  central  processing  unit  (CPU),  2)  input  devices,  3)  memory-storage  devices 

called  disk  drives,  4)  output  devices.  These  physical  parts  and  all  their  physical 

components are called hardware. 

The  power  of  computers  greatly  on  the  characteristics  of  memory-storage 

devices.  Most  digital  computers  store  data  both  internally,  in  what  is  called  main 

memory, and externally, on auxiliary storage units. As a computer processes data and 

instructions,  it  temporarily  stores  information  internally  on  special  memory 

microchips. Auxiliary storage units supplement the main memory when programmes 

are too large and they also offer a more reliable method for storing data. There exist 

different kinds of auxiliary storage devices, removable magnetic disks being the most 

widely  used.  They  can store  up to 100  megabytes of data on one disk,  a  byte being 

known as the basic unit of data storage. 

Output  devices  let  the  user  see  the  results  of  the  computer's  data  processing. 

Being the most commonly used output device, the monitor accepts video signals from 

a  computer  and  shows  different  kinds  of  information  such  as  text,  formulas  and 

graphics on its screen. With the help of various printers information stored in one of 

the computer's memory systems can be easily printed on paper in a desired number of 


332 

copies. 


Programmes,  also  called  software,  are  detailed  sequences  of  instructions  that 

direct  the  computer  hardware  to  perform  useful  operations.  Due  to  a  computer's 

operating  system  hardware  and  software  systems  can  work  simultaneously.  An 

operating  system  consists  of  a  number  of  programmes  coordinating  operations, 

translating the data from different input and output devices, regulating data storage in 

memory, transferring tasks to different processors, and providing functions that help 

programmers  to  write  software.  In  large  corporations  software  is  often  written  by 

groups of experienced programmers, each person focusing on a specific aspect of the 

total project. For this reason, scientific and industrial software sometimes costs much 

more than do the computers on which the programmes run. 

 

The first hackers 

 

(1)  The  first  "hackers"  were  students  at  the  Massachusetts  Institute  of 

Technology  (MIT)  who  belonged to the  TMRC  (Tech Model Railroad  Club).  Some 

of the members really built model trains. But many were more interested in the wires 

and circuits underneath the track platform. Spending hours at TMRC creating better 

circuitry was called "a  mere hack." Those  members who were interested in creating 

innovative,  stylistic,  and  technically  clever  circuits  called  themselves  (with  pride) 

hackers. 

(2)  During  the  spring  of  1959,  a  new  course  was  offered  at  MIT,  a  freshman 

programming class. Soon the hackers of the railroad club were spending days, hours, 

and nights hacking away at their computer, an IBM 704. Instead of creating a better 

circuit, their hack became creating faster, more efficient program - with the least 

number of lines of code. Eventually they formed a group and created the first 

set of hacker's rules, called the Hacker's Ethic. 

(3) Steven Levy, in his book Hackers, presented the rules: 

Rule 1: Access to computers - and anything, which might teach you, something 

about the way the world works - should be unlimited and total. 

Rule 2: All information should be free. 

Rule 3: Mistrust authority - promote decentralization. 

Rule 4: Hackers should be judged by their hacking, not bogus criteria such as 

degrees, race, or position. 

Rule 5: You can create art and beauty on a computer. 

Rule 6: Computers can change your life for the better. 

(4) These rules made programming at MIT's Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 

a challenging, all encompassing endeavor. Just for the exhilaration of programming, 

students in the Al Lab would write a new program to perform even the smallest tasks. 

The program would be made available to others who would try to perform the same 

task  with  fewer  instructions.  The  act  of  making  the  computer  work  more  elegantly 

was, to a bonafide hacker, awe-inspiring. 

(5) Hackers were given free reign on the computer by two AI Lab professors, 

"Uncle" John McCarthy and Marvin Minsky, who realized that hacking created new 

insights.  Over the  years, the  AI  Lab  created  many  innovations:  LIFE,  a  game  about 



333 

survival; LISP, a new kind of programming language; the first computer chess game; 

The CAVE, the first computer adventure; and SPACEWAR, the first video game. 

 



1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   70


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал