Issn 2308-0590 Индекс 74661 редакциялық кеңес мағауин Мұхтар Қазақстанның халық жазушысы Ғарифолла Есім



жүктеу 5.01 Kb.

бет9/17
Дата08.01.2017
өлшемі5.01 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17

2016  №1  (30)

51
penname “The forgotten one” was becoming true.
There is a draft letter kept in the family archives of
Mukhamedkhanovs’ which is Akhat’s appeal to the
authorities. Kayum Mukhamedkhanov helped Akhat
to draw the letter to authorities. Kayum also continued
sending appeals and letters to various authority bodies
and editorial boards. He argued that Shakarim was the
second greatest Kazakh poet after  Abai and that it
was necessary to make his creativity known to public.
“I suppose they refrain  from publishing out of false
precautions. “if something might possibly happen”,
Kayum wrote in one such letter.
One more example speaks for Kayum’s citizen
and  professional  position.  During  the  so  called
“stagnation  time”  (70s-80s  of  the  Soviet  time)  a
delegation of writers and culture representatives came
from Russia to Semipalatinsk. They were also brought
to the Abai’s birthplace that is located three hours
outside of Semipalatinsk. They visited Abai’s burial
place.  The  Party  members  guided  the  delegation.
Suddenly Kayum Mukhamedkhanov declared: “ There
is a burial place of another great son of the Kazakh
people”. With these words he led people to Shakarim’s
burial  place.  The  Party  people  were  shocked  and
indignant by Kayum’s behavior. Someone told him: “You
killed us all!”  Kayum knew no fear of them as the
voice of his conscience  was louder. He continued
working no matter what in the hope to see Shakarim’s
works published.
During the Gorbachev’s era the situation did not
improve.  Kayum  wrote  riches  of  materials  on
Shakarim’s biography and his creativity with deep
analysis. As it was always these materials are research
grounded,  based  on  the  originals  and  make  the
biography of the poet backed up with research findings.
In  July  1987  Mukhamedkhanov  wrote  a  letter  to
Kolbin - the first secretary of the Central Committee of
the Communist Party of Kazakhstan and to the first
secretary of the board of the Writers’ Union of the
USSR – Karpov. “… Restoration of Shakarim’s name
is one of the most important and acute problems for
the history of the literature and the entire Kazakh
culture… I dare to express my conviction that somebody
might not like the international spirit of Shakarim’s
creativity  and  those  “some”  try  to  label  him  with
nationalism. This dirty method is familiar to me. I myself
was a victim of that labeling”, wrote Kayum in one of
those letters.
Mukhamedkhanov submitted the article about
Shakarim and the editorial board of the newspaper
“Kazakh Adebieti” (“Kazakh literature”) did not publish
it, again, out of that fear of publishing an article about
the “disgraced” poet.
In this connection in February 1988  Kayum
wrote a letter to Moscow, to the chief of the editorial
board of the magazine “Ogonyok”, Mr. Korotich:
“How can this be explained that beginning with
1958 at Shakarim’s official rehabilitation nothing of his
works are still published. Two volume of his works were
prepared for publication in the mid-1960s. During all
this time only fourteen of Shakarim’s poems were
published  in  translation  in  the  book  “Poets  of
Kazakhstan”. And it took place in Leningrad. It is quite
obvious that serious roadblocks have been thrown up
by    authorities  in  Kazakhstan  against  restoration
Shakarim through publishing his works”, wrote Kayum.
A month later Kayum received a response from the
Writers’ Union of the USSR. “ We have read your letter
on the fate and creativity of the Kazakh poet and thinker
Shakarim with great attention. We have talked with the
people from the Central Committee of the Communist
Party of  Kazakhstan. We are  awaiting Shakarim’s
works  from  them  to  know  them  in  detail.  (Alla
Belyakina’s remark: The latter phrase is one more
unsolved puzzle in the fate of Shakarim’s creative
heritage. Who are those Party members who kept
Shakarim’s works?) We are arranging with the magazine
“Literary review” for you to publish the article on
Shakarim. In case they ask you to add something or
correct –please, do so. Shakarim is the second great
poet after Abai, as you know”.
On April 7,1988 Mukhamedkhanov received an
urgent telegram from the first secretary of the Writers
Union of Kazakhstan who personally congratulated
Kayum:
“Congratulatio ns!  Shakarim  has  been
rehabilitated by the directive authorities!”. This was
indeed a victory and Kayum  alone  had full right to
accept this commendation.
At  last,  after  so  many  years  in  darkness
Shakarim’s works saw the light. He finally received his
due. However, his true genius  was distorted again.
Many publishing houses rushed to publish Shakarim’s
works and biography. As the result of this haste many
mistakes were published. Again, Mukhamedkhanov
wrote textological articles, making comparisons with
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

52
the original works of Shakarim and correcting mistakes.
Turdikul Shanbai, director of Shakarim’s Center of the
Semipalatinsk Pedagogical Institute, tells that Kayum-
aga gave him one of such hastily published books and
told:
 “I will recite by memory Shakarims poems, you
follow and correct mistakes in the book.” Shanbai
exclaimed: “I was astonished by his memory. How many
slips, mistakes, distortions of the original verse were
found! What if he did not correct them? These distorted
versions would go on being disseminated…”
On April 23, 1988 the newspaper “Irtish” in
Semipalatinsk published the first article on Shakarim’s
biography, philosophical views and his creativity written
by Mukhamedkhanov. The articles was entitled “The
Return of the Poet”. As if it was devil that did not let
“The Forgotten one” to come back to people. Due to
technical problems some lines and even phrases of the
article were deleted. This destroyed the perception.
Being by nature a kind and mild person who would not
struggle for his personal well being, Kayum was very
rigor and firm in profession. He insisted that the article
be republished without errors. And it was published
again. “Our people need Shakarim in his true and original
individuality. Shakarim is needed for enriching our
spiritual life…”, - Kayum concluded that essay.
This is only a portion of what Kayum did to more
than  rehabilitate  Shakarim.    Through  his  efforts,
Shakarim’s greatness is again known, and another gap
in the history of Kazakh literature has been filled.
THE FOUNDER OF THE MUSEUM OF ABAI
Kayum on the advice of his teacher Auezov
created the first Museum of Abai in Semipalatinsk. For
this to happen it was necessary to build a foundation –
to collect museum exhibits and research paths. Auezov
saw that only Kayum could do this. Together with his
teacher Auezov he found the appropriate building for
the museum. Kayum led all research and enrichment of
the museum with new exhibits from the very start.
Thanks to Kayum’s efforts and his great preparatory
work the establishment of the first museum of Abai took
place in 1940. The museum of Abai in Semipalatinsk
went under the umbrella of the Academy of Sciences in
1947 and Kayum Mukhamedkhanov was officially
appointed its director by the order of the President of
the Academy - Satpayev. Before that the Soviet ideology
appointed  for  the  position  party  members  and
agricultural activists. This ended the changing roster of
political  appointees  to  the  position  whose  sole
qualification was their loyalty to the Party. One of those
political appointees was so unqualified that he replaced
a museum exhibit with the portraits of shepherds, the
“Heroes of Socialist Labor”. All museum successes in
finding more museum exhibits, in identifying research
topics, in publishing research on Abai belong to Kayum.
When repression of intelligentsia and the attacks
on Auezov began Kayum was persecuted for his work
as museum director as well. He was accused of “anti-
Soviet activity and nationalism”. In the Semipalatinsk
archives there is a document,  the minutes of the August
28, 1951 meeting of the Presidium of the Academy of
Sciences of Kazakhstan. This document states that
“serious  ideological  mistakes”,  “bourgeois    and
nationalistic anti-research concept of “Abai’s followers”
were the focal point of the museum’s propaganda. It
continued that “some exhibits  were not in compliance
with the ideology as they were dedicated to Kenesari
Kasymov, a suppressor of people who was presented
as people’s defender. The division “Abai’s relatives”,
“Abai’s family” idealized a patriarchal, tribal society.
The  sayings  of  Kenesary,  the  worst  enemy  of  the
working people were cited. The first two divisions
represented the portraits and pictures of khans, sultans,
biys, aksakals (men of wisdom), mullahs, auls’ heads
and tsar colonizers. The division “Literary school of
Abai” represented portraits  and works of politically
doubtful people”…
So, Kayum Mukhamedkhanov was dismissed
as director of the museum. Kayum himself would say:
“I  was  blamed  for  the  creation  of  the  biography
department and that I devoted space on the exhibition
to bais and khans. But if there were no Kunanbaev,
how could Abai – his son, evolve? If there were no
sultan Shyngiz Valikhanov we would not have had
Shokhan Valikhanov. However, no one would ever
consider this elementary logic.”
Kayum’s  contribution  to  the  museum  was
invaluable. All his successors – directors note that “each
and every item in the museum is directly related to
Kayum-aga.  He  was  the  founding  father  of  the
museum”. When in 1940 the museum was opened,
Kayum who worked as a senior researcher there and
began a relentless search for  documents, pictures,
personal belongings, household articles of Abai and his
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

53
environment. As the result of this laborious work he
gathered more than 500 items for the museum. For
example, in 1941, thanks to him the museum collection
was enriched with the unique photo of Abai and his
sons made in 1896.  Imagine, that by the time the
museum was created in 1940, that is 36 years after
Abai’s death, these artifacts could have disappeared
forever!
At  the  same  time,  (the  1940’s)    Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov put all his energy and efforts to build
Abai’s mausoleum on the poet’s burial place and restore
Abai’s winter home. We can see in  Kayum’s letters
that he made appeals to the Government, and  to the
Academy of Sciences. These letters speak for Kayum’s
tireless  advocacy  for Abai’s  legacy.  They  include
detailed plans and concrete suggestions to immortalize
Abai in national monuments, in art, and in establishing
memorial complex like the house-museum of Pushkin,
Lermontov, Tolstoy, and  Chekhov. Sadly, the nuclear
test site constructed on Abai’s land delayed this dream
for fifty years to come.
IMPRISONMENT. KARLAG
Kayum’s elder children vividly remember the
violent pounding on the door that preceded the KGB
bursting into the apartment the night of December
1,1951. Then they began ransacking everything. They
took away all books  and manuscripts of Kayum’s
research works. They confiscated more than a trunk’s
worth of  Kayum’s  correspondence with Auezov and
other colleagues. At this time, none of the family knew
that it all was gone forever. No matter how many times
Kayum would appeal to KGB and other authorities, it
was never returned. This huge layer of the historic and
cultural  heritage  disappeared  into  KGB  archives.
Everything else in the house was confiscated – bonds,
furniture, valuables. They confiscated even children’s
beds and chairs. This  nightmare lasted whole night,
until  Kayum was taken by the KGB. When he was
leaving his home, he gathered the strength of mind to
smile at his wife and  children and say reassuringly: “I
will  come back”. His older children ran after him, crying
with powerless tears.
First  he  was    put  in  the  internal  prison  in
Semipalatinsk. Next, he was taken to Almaty prison
for nine long months. He remembers a small, windowless
basement  room measuring a meter squared. He soon
realized  how the floor and the concrete walls were
unbearably hot, baking his naked body. Many hours of
this torture continued until he lost consciousness. Any
prisoner who collapsed was taken away on stretchers.
The torments continued for those who were stronger.
Feet burning, prisoners would begin jumping from one
foot to the other. At some point the door would open
and guards would give a flat dish of water to the sufferer
who was at the point of frenzy. But this was a dish-
sieve and one could not get a mouthful of water out of
it. At night, at 11 pm the prisoner was taken to the
latrine to pick up feces covered board and carry it to
the prison cell. It meant the following: if you do not
want to burn on the heated floor then sleep on the dirty
board.  Kayum-aga  recollected  that  when  he  was
tortured in the burning prison cell he thought: “If  hell
exists –here it is.” Then the heat was changed to bone-
chilling cold.  The cycle was repeated.
Prisoners were prohibited to lie or to sit in their
cells. Their pillows and mattresses were scrap metal.
The only “food’ was a bad soup with rare cabbage
pieces. A prisoner could not eat this as it was frequently
brought before interrogations. When interrogations
finished a prisoner would find  leftovers after rats’ feast.
No less was the suffering of watching  luxurious food
placed on the other side of the prison bars. There was
one cost for it: Mukhamedkhanov’s signature  confessing
to anti-Soviet activities. Refusal to sign meant watching
rats consume the food in front of the hungry prisoner.
What else did Mukhamedkhanov endure at that
time? A monstrous torture that is said to be invented by
the  Chinese:  water  dropping on  the  temple.  They
wanted  to  break  Kayum  physically  so  they  drove
needles under his nails and kicked him with military
boots. Kayum remembers a moment when he thought
that he was left without a face: they broke his nose.
Mukhamedkhanov suffered another horrible torture: his
legs and hands were tied up, the head was covered
with rubber sack and he was beaten with truncheons.
When the suffocating victim was at the edge of losing
consciousness the sack was taken away and the paper
was given to sign the invented by the KGB confessions.
Kayum was firm and resisted signing it. This wonderful
man with a subtle soul of a poet
had unbending will.
During our talk Kayum Mukhamedkhanov noted: “A
human being dies only once. I thought: if I die, what is
my death  compared to the perished great Kazakh
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

54
people of Alash…” The physical tortures did not make
Kayum refuse his research ideas on the existence of
Abai’s school. Kayum did not betray his teacher and
research guide Auezov as the authorities wanted him
to.
Very soon it was clear that the reason behind
this imprisonment and torture was Auezov. During one
of the interrogations seven interrogators in succession
attacked Kayum replacing one another as they were
exhausted.  They  kicked  him  with  military  boots,
attempting to break him down so he would sign a
document that said Auezov  made Mukhamedkhanov
write his dissertation on Abai’s poetic school. “ I would
rather die than slander. How could one live on with
such a slander?...” –this is what Kayum never doubted
throughout his life.
Several  years  later  when  Auezov  asked
Mukhamedkhanov to reflect on his time in prison,
Kayum responded with a verse that he wrote there. It
is not easy to express the level of the emotional strain
and bitterness in a word for word translation. There
was everything in this verse: endless prison’s nights,
bitter tears and the overwhelming desire to be in a  future
far away from the  suffering.  Yet the strength of love
for life and lack of malice  prevails in this verse:
I am not embittered by fate
Through all the hardships and harshness
My heart remains alive.
Fate, you have taken my freedom
But I am not under your thumb…
Many years later during a conversation with
Auezov Kayum still was able to joke that in the Almaty
prison he was privileged to be placed in “individual
luxury room”.
This  time  was  hard  for  the  family.  Many  of
Kayum’s friends and frequent guests in his house turned
away. Some of them even began shadowing the family
and  writing    denunciations.  Some  even    advised
Farkhinur, Kayum’s wife, to abandon children of “the
enemy of people”, and place them in a children’s home
so she could  begin a new life without the stigma of
being Kayum’s wife. The children remember this clearly.
They also remember how the family, which then included
six children and their pregnant mother, were forced to
move into the smallest room of the three room apartment
where  they  lived.  The  rest  of  the  apartment  was
occupied by the families of military officials or Party
members.  Nowadays  it  is  155  Ibrayev’s  street  in
Semipalatinsk.
The younger children were moved from the front
of their classrooms to the back. The children became
outcast despite their intellectual gifts. The family was
left without anything to live. Farkhinur had to take a
job in the hospital that was located across from  the
house. She was continually threatened with eviction
from their tiny room because she could not pay the
rent. Therefore the two oldest children had to leave
school and go to work.
There were a few who were not intimidated and
were faithful to the family. Boris Akerman, Kayum’s
colleague from  the Abai museum,  visited the family
and helped as he could with  money and advice. He
compiled inquiries and appeals on Kayum’s fate and
the letters in defense of the family’s rights on housing.
Kayum-aga could only guess about the hardships that
his family had to survive.
On May 13,1930 in line with the petition of the
Kazakh authorities the camp for specific purposes was
established  in Akmola  and  Karaganda  regions  of
Kazakhstan. It was 110 000 hectares of lands and for
unlimited time use. This is how one more “sister camp”
of GULAG was built that was called Karlag. That was
a huge country of camp islands scattered in the dull
steppe. That was a country inhabited by semi-slaves,
semi-hard laborers who became the symbol of hostility
to the socialist paradise. It was here where Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov was to stay for several years.
The undefeated prisoner was sentenced to 25
years of imprisonment according to the deadly article
58 by the verdict of the Supreme Soviet of the Kazakh
Soviet Socialist Republic. The hearing of his case lasted
for three days, from May 28 to May 31,1952. Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov was brought to the court from
Almaty prison to Semipalatinsk. He denied to admit
the  allegations  and  blames.  It  was,  certainly,  not
considered. Certainly, the false evidence of recent
colleagues  was  t aken  int o  account .  Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov escaped supreme penalty because
the  death  penalty  was  abolished  in  the  USSR  in
connection with the victory over the fascist Germany.
Was the idea of staying behind the barbed for 25 years
easier then? Can one call it a life?
The prisoner Mukhamedkhanov crushed and
carried stones for several years. He was never once
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

55
called by name, but had a prisoner number assigned.
Shout: “Number such, stand up!”, - became customary.
Every several months the prisoners were moved to
different prisons. Kayum-aga stayed in Temirtau, in
Karabas, in Dolinka, in Darya, in Kula-Aigir… The
entry in his file stating “ready for physical work” meant
inhumane work in quarries with harsh norms on crushing
and carrying stones.
It is hard to say what was more difficult: lack of
communication  with the loved ones or the psychological
pressure. The prisoners were allowed to write about
health, weather, children’s study, about relatives, nothing
else. Even at night he could not rest, for perhaps the
unkind eyes of secret agents were watching him so they
could  bring a negative report to the authorities, resulting
in more beating and humiliation in the morning.
The prisoners were habitually robbed by the
prison staff, who opened  their packages and mail.
Kayum did not escape the mass robbery. The majority
suffered but only few were not afraid of repercussions
and spoke up. Mukhamedkhanov wrote several times
to  prison  authorities  about  the  problem.  He  gave
detailed information including dates and names of these
incidents. “ I do not desire revenge, but my insulted
humane  conscience  made  me  bring  this  to  your
attention…”, he wrote.
Even in prison’s life there were moments that left
good memories. For example,  when finally released,
Kayum would tell his children how expressively well
the Russian folk singer Lidiya Ruslanova sang the
Russian folk song “Valenki” (felt boots). She sat in the
same prison. The best intelligentsia were imprisoned
by Stalin, so imprisonment was  an opportunity for the
meeting of many great minds. One of Kayum’s fellow
prisoners had a copy of the Russian writer  Karamzin’s
novel “Unfortunate Lisa”. Kayum translated it from  the
Russian prose into Kazakh verse version in 15 days
only. Surely the sad mood of the novel coincided with
the spiritual mood of the prisoner-translator.
Behind the barbed wire Kayum struggled for his
future. In 1952 he wrote a letter to the chairman of the
Cabinet of Ministers of the USSR -Malenkov, to the
first  secretary  of  the  Central  Committee  of  the
Communist Party of the Soviet Union –Khrushchev, to
the General secretary of the Writers’ Union of the USSR
- Fadeyev. The lines of the letter written by the hands
of the exhausted prisoner contain everything: hope for
reason, anguish, last hope on the fair outcome and end
of  the  horror:  “…literary  court  Mukanov  and  his
supporters had used the tested strategies of Abai’s
enemies that of slander and intrigue to humiliate and
discredit their enemy Auezov. I have become the victim
of unprincipled literary courts and KGB who harshly
violated  law  using  falsifications  of  the  accusation
materials and by applying prohibited by law methods
of interrogation. I could not hope for justice and humane
approach to the fate of the human being on behalf of
the prosecution and the court… Indifference of these
people rose up like a stone wall in front of me. They
seem to stick to the rule: let the one who fell down be
trampled!”
Kayum was fortunate to give this letter to the
wife  of  the  prisoner  to  send  it  out.  Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov’s note to the type-writer is also kept
in the family archives. It says: “Dear! I request to type
on one side with interval of one and a half or two. There
are two names in the text of my appeal. This is poet
Abai and khan Ablai. I pay your specific attention to
this. This letter contains my fate. You surely understand
this. You will do me a great favor by typing the letter. I
hope you will not refuse your kindness to the unfortunate
one…”
There was no response for some time. The only
safety-valve although cut back and censored was the
possibility of correspondence with the wife and children.
The messages from the prison, there are not many, but
each one is full of love and hope: “…My dearest, I am
all right. I understand well enough, my dearest, that it is
hard for you to live without me. I am also sad at the
thought that I am far away from you. But this is just
temporary. We have to accept these difficulties…My
dearest, all you have in youth time – the strength of
spirit and thought, eye observation, skills, - all devote
to your study. I have no other wish but one so you can
study well and have a happy life… I am grateful to the
people who render a helping hand in hard times. I am
especially thankful to them for helping my children. I
wish them long, happy and rich life. All honors and praise
to them!”
Behind  barbed wire was where Kayum wrote
the verses devoted to his children and his wife. Naming
every child, recollecting their dear and ingenious traits
the prison’s poet created the lines full of love and
gratitude to Farkhinur. These verses were published
forty years after they were written. Still they pierce
everyone who reads them: ”..you burn out with me in
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

56
the flame of sadness. You love me sincerely with your
generous heart. You are a sacred person and I worship
you. You keep your husband’s honor with dignity. You
keep with dignity hardships of motherhood, my trustful
friend, my dear Farkhinur. I am always proud of you.
Kayum.”(line by line translation). Mukhamedkhanov
had been always proud of his wife. Kayum carried her
picture in the inner pocket of his suit,  close to his heart
till the last days of his life.
…In December 1954 (they say it was Fadeyev’s
help), Mukhamedkhanov’s sentence was cancelled and
he was rehabilitated. However, he was not released
until  1955. The court machine did not hurry in this.
Finally that day came. Kayum was given a train ticket
from the station Makinka to Almaty. At the Almaty
station he made a call to Ismailov who was freed earlier.
He  informed  Kayum  that Auezov  is  very  much
concerned about Kayum. Certainly, Kayum called his
teacher. Auezov urged Kayum to come to his place
right away. Kayum was wearing a padded jacket that
the prison gave him and he had six rubles in his pocket.
The train for Semipalatinsk was scheduled in three
hours. He decided to see his family first. In two weeks
he returned to Almaty to talk with his teacher. There
were long hour non stop talks. This time they both were
linked  not  only  with  Kayum’s  father’s  name  –
Mukhamedkhan  Seitkulov  at  whose  house  young
Auezov used to stop and live for long time. Not only
common research interest to Abai connected them. This
time the prison’s recollections were in common. They
both had undergone imprisonment at age of 35 with
the only difference that Auezov was imprisoned in 30-
s and Mukhamedkhanov in 50-s. During these talks
Auezov recollected that he was in prison with the Alash
intelligentsia –Jumabayev, Aimauitov and Baitursunov.
Baitursinov would advise to Auezov: “We have to ask
forgiveness from the Party if we want to save the name
and the works of Abai and bring his legacy to people.
We have to step back in order to preserve the heritage.”
This humiliation was the cost for the possibility to go on
with the work in propagating  and keeping the cherished
for the Kazakh people name of Abai.
Mukhamedkhanov had to struggle for several
years to restore his research degree, return to the
workplace, and receive a teaching workload that was
reduced and he was shifted  from one department to
another. There was red tape in restoring the records of
his labor length. It was quite an ordeal to return to his
own apartment. It took time to write appeals, wait to
receive bureaucratic formal replies, and write again to
go to the court until the apartment was returned. On
top of  that Kayum  was for  a long  time under  the
annoying surveillance of the authorities. For instance,
the notification document of December 8, 1955 that is
kept in the family archive says that he was supposed to
show up in Almaty KGB office.
Did he become a different person after the prison?
Malice,  revenge,  offence  on  the  entire  world  or
readiness to bend in front of the authorities could not
infect Kayum’s pure soul. But the life had added up
some different after taste…
Kayum  played  dombra  well.  The  political
prisoners in Karlag taught him to play mandolina (note:
it is a  Russian string instrument). He brought this
instrument home. The children remember how the father
would take it and played singing in a calm and sincere
voice one and the same song of Nekrasov “Troika”
(three  horses  bent  together):  “Why  are  you  fully
absorbed watching the road…”  Besides, he would
very often cite lines from the Lermontov’s verse:
Farewell, unwashed Russia,
The country of slaves, the country of masters
And you, blue full dressed uniform,
And you, devoted to them people
The communist ideologists under Lenin’s push
called themselves the direct descendants of Decembrists
(representatives of higher society who struggled against
Tsar for people’s well being). In Stalin’s time the main
function  of  the  authorities  was  suppressing  the
intelligentsia’s free thought. The authorities of Stalin’s
time became a copy of the “blue full dress uniform” of
the Tsar regime followed by the blue headwear of the
KGB of that time. The Russian poet Anna Akhmatova
in “Requiem” drew a comparative parallel between the
blue uniform of tsar time and the blue headwear of the
KGB of that time. The analogy of the color of the
uniform  is  a  political  analogy.  Apparently  this
comparison  came  to  Kazakhstan  poet  Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov even though he probably did not
know about Akhmatova’s “Requiem”. Deep in his
thoughts he would cite Lermontov’s verse about the
country of slaves and masters, about blue uniforms and
the obedient to them people…
In 1952 in Karlag Kayum Mukhamedkhanov
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

57
wrote one more verse that can be considered as the
epitaph of that period of life. It is full of yarning for the
native land. It concludes almost in moaning:
Return me back, the native land of Semey,
In you small piece I will lie free
                                                (line by line translation)
As  the  fut ure  long  life  of  Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov proved he truly did not wish more
happiness as the happiness of living on the cherished
piece of land close to the loved ones. And those who
tried to deprive him of all this…
Two years before Kayum Mukhamedkhanov’s
death Alla Belyakina, a journalist talked with him about
this period of his unique fate.
At some point he asked me to stop the talk about
the time beyond the life. This was the pain on the face
of a 85 year old man. The pain. Alive. Unbearing.
Sharp. The pain that had not lessened in years. The
whitened old fingers tied up the edge of the bed cover.
This was the pain, though it did not leave the scars of
malice at all: “They only implemented orders…What is
their guilt?...”
KAYUM: A RESEARCH INSTITUTE IN
HIMSELF
Today, 
going 
through 
Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov’s  works  –published  books,
monographs, articles, studying directions of his research,
touching hundreds of his files with riches of materials,
you stop at some point to ask a question: how could
one person research volumes of work that is the job of
several research institutions? Each one of his articles
would be a good foundation for a dissertation. All his
articles are research grounded and based on primary
sources, archival documents followed with in-depth
comparisons and analysis.
In  the  1940’s  Kayum  Mukhamedkhanov
submitted manuscripts of previously undiscovered
primary sources with his analysis to the branch of the
Kazakh Academy of Sciences. They were approved
for publication. Among them there were “Kabanbai
batir”, “Bogenbai batir” (both in around 90 pages,
1943); “Poet Arip” (more than 500 pages, 1944),
“Literary School of Abai” (more than 700 pages, 1945);
unpublished verses and words of wisdom of Abai,
Abai’s sayings on his followers Shakarim and Arip.
In 1945 Kayum Mukhamedkhanov participated
in preparing the first volume of the “History of Kazakh
Literature”  for  publication.  Mukhtar Auezov  had
entrusted him with writing the section on folk creativity,
connecting it  with national heroes of the past. Kayum
organized  the manuscripts on folk and historical poems,
many of which he had discovered: Kabanbai batir,
Bogenbai batir and others. Kayum worked hard as
practically no other materials on this issue existed. The
volume was published in 1948, but  without the section
on the  folk historical poems… When Kayum asked
his supervisor Auezov why, the answer was: “ It was
not my decision. The authorities demanded that nothing
on Kabanbai batir or Bogenbai batir, or anyone like
them, be disseminated. They said that they did not want
any nationalistic materials.”
Few people know that Auezov was dismissed
from  the book’s editorial board  for “ruining the work”.
Both the teacher and  pupil suffered of this injustice.
Fortunately    Kayum’s  works  were  preserved  and
published in the last decade of the 20-th century. Now
the heroes he wrote about are a matter of national pride.
Many  of  Mukhamedkhanov’s  works  and  research
findings were seminal for the literature and culture of
Kazakhstan.  For instance,  for  many years  various
theories  existed on exact date of the birth and the
birthplace of Bukhar jirau, another great poet of the
Kazak, hindering the developments  in the study of the
Kazakh culture. Because of his research and extensive
knowledge Mukhamedkhanov was able to pinpoint the
location and date of the poet’s birth, an exciting victory
for research.
The  staff  of  the  Semipalatinsk  museum  of
Dostoevsky still gratefully remembers  that Kayum
Mukhamedkhanov stated the exact date of the famous
photo of Dostoevsky and Valikhanov. For many years
it  was  considered  to  be  1856.  Mukhamedkhanov
conducted research, studied archive materials, made
comparisons, studied their correspondence and came
to the conclusion that the photo was made two years
later.
This  is  just  a  small  part  o f  what
Mukhamedkhanov accomplished. Mukhamedkhanov’s
research interest also encompassed historical, literary
and textological study of many cultural and literary
traditions. He wrote and published  articles on the
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

58
Russian writers Rileyev, Dal, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy,
Chekhov, Gorky, Vsevolod Ivanov; on the Ukrainian
writer Shevchenko, on the Tatar writers Tokai, Nasiri,
Kamal,  and  Faizkhanov;  on  the  Kyrgyz  writers:
Satilganov; on the Turkmen writer: Kerbabayev; on the
Uzbek writers: Navoi and Niyazi; on the Azerbaijan
writer:  Gadjibekov;  on  the  Armenian  writer:
Nalbandyan; on Lezgin: Stalskiy; on Latvian: Rainis;
on the Polish writers: Mitskevitch and Yurandet; and
on the Chinese writer: Lu Sin.
He continued with in-depth research on  Kazakh
literature and culture. Kayum Mukhamedkhanov is the
author  of  the  monumental  research  works:  “The
textology of Bukhar jirau’s works”, “The textology of
Makhambet’s works”, “Research grounded biography
of Auezov”.
He prepared for publication the collection of
works of Abai’s follower Uais Shondibayev followed
with his textological analysis. He wrote many research
articles on significant representatives of the Kazakh
literature, culture, art and theatre: Amre Kashaubayev,
Estai Berkimbayev, Sadir akyn and Beisembai akyn,
Shokan and Maki Valikhanov, Utemisov, Dauletbayev,
Jambil, Shanin,  Baiseitova, Musin,  Sain, Seifullin,
Jansugurov, Mailin, Altinsarin, Jomartbayev, Dulatov,
Baitursinov,  Aimauitov,  Toraigirov,  Khasenov,
Momishuli, Kaliyev, Jarokov and others.
Kayum  Mukhamedkhanov’s  memoirs  on
Mukhtar  Auezov,  Estai,  Sain,  Vsevolod  Ivanov,
Khadzhi Mukan are included in the heritage of the
history of the Kazakh literature. He also did a significant
research on the history of establishment of the Kazakh
theatre.
Is  it  not  true  that  you  have  dizziness  on
enumerating only the names? And this is not all. In 1977,
when  the  12  volume    Kazakh  encyclopedia  was
published, Kayum Mukhamedkhanov analyzed all 12
volumes.  He  corrected  erroneous  dates,  sites,
chronology and biographical information. This included
articles on all aspects of culture, art, theatre, literature
and history of Kazakhstan. Again, each correction was
research grounded and supported by the documents in
his own archives. When he retired, the invitation to edit
the new editions of  the Kazakh encyclopedia was
certainly no surprise.  At the same time he was working
on his articles for the “Abai” encyclopedia as well.
Mukhamedkhanov’s research is a constituent part of
the treasure of  Kazakh literature study. Hundreds of
files with riches of materials left after death of this great
researcher could lay foundations for new directions in
research.  He  embodied  the  most  import ant
characteristics of the conscientious researcher: strict
faithfulness to primary sources. To publish one article
could mean for him processing a dozen file drawers of
sources.
Practically all his work was based on materials
he himself discovered; materials that might remain
undiscovered if he had not done this work for  Kazakh
literature and culture. Hundreds of letters from the
libraries and archives all over the former USSR speak
for this scrupulous and accurate work. This work took
much energy and personal expenses. He would not have
it otherwise.
One example of his research from the article
published on Ilyas Boragansky, shows his intensive
painstaking methodology. He wanted to identify the first
publisher of Abai’s works. (note:  as it is known Abai’s
poems were first published in 1909 in Saint Petersburg.
The publisher’s name remained in oblivion for many
decades).
What Kayum tells is the research methods and
this is what Kayum Mukhamedkahnov tells:
 “ In 1966 I sent an inquiry to the Lenin State
Library in Moscow. They did not find any materials on
Boragansky and so readdressed my inquiry to the
library of the Institute of the Peoples of Asia in the
Academy of Sciences of the USSR. Soon I received a
response saying that no materials related to Boragansky
were found there. Professor Dantsig, the scholar of
Oriental Studies of that Institute recommended that I
write to professor Kononov and Novitchov of the
Leningrad branch of the Institute of the Peoples of Asia.
When I received that address, I sent my inquiry again.
Kononov responded. His staff member did some search
and found a review for 1855-1905 of the Oriental
Studies Department of the St. Petersburg University.
There was a mention: “Ilyas Boragansky is teaching
the Turkic language from August 20,1908.
…This remained the only source and my further
efforts to know more reached a dead end in 1966.
Two years later, I happened to be looking through the
old newspaper files of “Kazakh Language”. All of a
sudden I saw the following written in capital letters in
the newspaper of October 28, 1922: “Boragansky –
Elder” The Bashkir government congratulated him on
his  70-th  birthday.  Now  my  search  was  aimed  at
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

59
Bashkiriya.
Excitedly, I sent inquiries to the central library
and the archives of Bashkiriya. Alas, this did not bring
results. No information existed there, but I did not lose
hope and I sent out letters to writers and poets of
Bashkiriya.  Soon  the  oldest  writer  Saifi  Kudash
responded.  He  directed  me  to  further  search  in
magazines. Then I sent out inquiries to a number of
libraries in  the USSR. Finally, in 1970, I was happy to
held in my hand that same magazine with the article on
Boragansky and his picture.”
Indeed, the question arises: if not him, then who?
Who could spend that much time and energy, personal
money for innumerous inquiries for the sake of revealing
the historic person’s name? The name that brought more
light in research related to Abai. Who else could have
that many years of patience and fortitude to continue
searching and reach the goal? This search was done on
the  background  of  versatile  hard  work  of
Mukhamedkhanov on many other issues.
The tremendous amount of materials that were
sent to him from libraries and archives were in Arab,
Persian, Tatar, Bashkir and other languages. Again,
tireless  Kayum  did  the  work  of  entire  research
institutions in translating those materials in Russian, in
Kazakh,  in  Tatar,  etc. All  his  fundamental  works,
articles, correspondence are written in accurate minute
handwriting. Kayum never forgot the exact location of
any materials. When he was away from home, he could
call and ask someone to open a certain file to find a
page he needed. Not long before death, even while
bedridden young researchers consulted him. They were
struck by his amazing memory: he could quote  poems
word for word and give the exact page number where
they could be found.
Kayum Mukhamedkhanov always read with pen
in hand. He conducted a dialogue with any author: he
corrected mistakes, wrote commentaries on margins,
put question marks where he found discrepancies. All
that captured his attention was systematized in files.
In  1940  Mukhamedkhanov  translated  the
musical comedy of the Azerbaijan composer Gajibekov
“Arshin Mal Alan”. It was staged for many years in the
Semipalatinsk Kazakh Musical Drama Theatre and in
the State Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet.
His translation work was extensive. To give some
examples, in1941 he translated  Pushkin’s “Mermaid”.
An official document in the family archive  says that
Kayum  was  entrusted  to  translate  Bomarshe’s
“Marriage of Figaro”. The manuscript was confiscated
at the time of  Kayum’s arrest. He resumed this work
after his release but only small portion of it survived. In
1952 in prison he did a poetic translation of the Russian
novel of  Karamzin, “The Unfortunate Liza”. In 1955
he translated “Dekameron”of Boccacho. In 1973 he
translated the play of the Tatar writer Sharif  Kamal “
Khadji Afendi is Marrying”, which was staged for ten
years. His translations of  Oriental legends and the Tatar
poet Gabdulla Tokai are well known.
Thanks to Mukhamedkhanov’s translation the
play of the Polish playwright Yurandet “This is such a
time” and the Grakov’s drama version of  the novel by
Fadeyev  “Young  guards”  were  articulated  in  the
Kazakh language.
In 1968 Mukhamedkhanov coauthored  a script
of the documentary film “The town of my youth” with
Semyon Anisimov, which was  dedicated to the 250 th
anniversary of his native Semipalatinsk. He also wrote
a guide to the Abai  Museum.This guide was translated
into Russian by Kayum’s colleague Mstislav Shatalin.
Beginning in 1970 Kayum supervised the work of a
TV  show  where  he  lectured  every  month  on  the
prominent  Kazakhs.
He also wrote more than 100 verses and poems.
He is the author of five plays that were successfully
staged in theatres.
It will never be possible to depict in full the life
and fate of Kayum, an authentic patriot  of the Kazakh
nation, about the riches of his heart and soul. This is for
his followers to implement. The great student of a great
teacher, the founder and researcher of the school of
Abai, Kayum has created his own school of students
and followers. Generations of his students that he
nurtured and educated during sixty years of teaching
became dignified citizens of our country.
Kayum Mukhamedkhanov entered the golden
pages of the history of Kazakhstan.
Worthy examples of the life and struggle of the
repressed  citizens  of  the  ideas  and  values  of
independence must be skillfully integrated into the
education.
By the importance and contribution to his country
Kayum Mukhamedkhanov is  comparable to such great
people of Russia, as Dmitri Likhachev, Lev Gumilev
and Sergei Mikhalkov.
Kayum’s life and fate is a vivid example of service
to the nation and love for the Motherland.
He himself is the Kazakhstan eternal value.
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)

60
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)
Резюме
В статье говорится о Каюме Мухамедханове как о ученого, абаеведа, педагога, профессора,
писателья, драматурга, поэта и переводчика.
Мақалада  автор  Қайым  Мұхамедхановтың  зерттеушілік,  ұстаздық,  жазушылық,
драматургтік, аудармашылық қасиеттерін ашып көрсеткен.
Резюме

61
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)
УДК 821.512.122
А.МАШАКОВА,  кандидат  филологических  наук,  ведущий  научный
сотрудник Института литературы и искусства им. М.О.Ауэзова
г.Алматы
ЭПИСТОЛЯРНОЕ НАСЛЕДИЕ
АБАЕВЕДА КАЮМА МУХАМЕДХАНОВА
Статья посвящена недавно изданной книге «Қайым Мұхамедханов: Хаттар сөйлейді. Каюм
Мухамедханов: Письма говорят». В ней представлена переписка К.Мухамедханова с  научными
организациями, библиотеками, музеями, издательствами, друзьями и родственниками.
Ключевые слова: переписка, абаеведение, увековечение, изыскательская работа
В  этом  году  в  Казахст ане  широ ко
отмечается 100-летие Каюма Мухамедханова –
известного   казахского   учёного -абаеведа,
писателя,  поэта,  переводчика,  педагога,
общественного деятеля, члена Союза писателей
СССР.  К.Мухамедханов  является  одним  из
основоположников  научного  направления  –
абаеведения.  Защищенная  им  в  1951  году
кандидатская диссертация «Литературная школа
Абая»,  изданные  в  конце  1950-х  монографии
«Текстология  произведений  Абая»,  «Поэты
абайского  окружения»,  «По эт  Магавья
Кунанбаев»  внесли  значительные  вклад  в
развитие 
абаеведения. 
Про фессор
К.Мухамедханов – автор многих научных статей,
посвященных творчеству Абая и его учеников. В
1996  году  ученый  удостоен  Государственной
премии Республики Казахстан.
В Алматы Общественным фондом «Центр
образо вания  и  культуры  им.  Каюма
Мухамедханова» недавно издана книга «Қайым
Мұхамедханов:  Хаттар  сөйлейді.  Каюм
Мухамедханов: Письма говорят». Эпистолярное
наследие  отечественного  ученого  раскрывает
многое  не  только  в  научной  и  литературной
деятельности  Каюма  Мухамедханова,  но  и  в
самой  эпохе и  ее  людях.  Книга воссоздает  его
жизненный путь, показывает характер человека
целеустремленного и трудолюбивого, доброго и
благородного,  дружелюбного  и  стойкого.
Знакомясь с перепиской, охватывающей вторую
половину  ХХ  сто летия,  читатель  узнает
историю  нашей  страны,    погружается  в
атмосферу прошлых лет.
Книга  начинается  с  его  письма  Канышу
Сатпаеву,  датированного  1945  годом.  Тогда
К.Сатпаев  возглавлял  Казахский  филиал
Академии наук СССР. В следующем письме от
14.06.1949  г.  К.Мухамедханов,  будучи
директором  Государственного  литературного
музея  Абая,  обращается  уже  к  Президенту
Академии наук КазССР, академику К.И.Сатпаеву.
Как  известно,  К.Сатпаев    приложил  немало
усилий для преобразования казахского филиала
в  самостоятельную  организацию.  В  этих
письмах 
К.Мухамедханов 
пишет 
о
необходимости  строительства  капитальных
мемориальных  сооружений  для  увековечения
Абая, таких как постройка мавзолея над могилой
Абая, 
сооружение 
памятников 
в
Семипалатинске  и  Алма-Ате,  реставрация
зимовки  Абая  в  Жидебае.  К.Мухамедханов
предлагает провести эту работу до 1954 года к
50-летию со дня смерти Абая, так как «мы можем
ожидать  прибытия  делегаций  из  зарубежных
стран». Он отмечает, что «работники музея Абая
по  своему  положению  более  чем  другие
чувствуют в своей ежедневной работе прилив

62
ҚАЙЫМ МҰХАМЕДХАНҰЛЫ - 100 ЖАС
2016  №1  (30)
широкого интереса к Абаю». В примечаниях к
письмам  составители  книги  указывают,  что
реализация  предлагаемых  мероприятий  по
увековечению Абая была  осуществлена, но не
сразу.
Переписка  с  Мухтаром  Ауэзовым,
представленная в книге «Каюм Мухамедханов:
Письма  говорят»,  демонстрирует  большую
изыскательскую  работу К.Мухамедханова  под
руководством своего наставника. Он ездил по
стране,  собирал  рукописи,  документы  и
фотографии, касающиеся Абая Кунанбаева и его
учеников,  записывал  воспоминания  людей,
лично знакомых с великим казахским поэтом.
Следует  отметить,  что  М.О.Ауэзо в  знал
К.Мухамедханова с детства, так как приходил в
гости к его отцу Мухамедхану Сейткулову и часто
беседовал с Каюмом.  В 1951 году М.О.Ауэзов
был  научным  руководителем  кандидатской
диссертации К.Мухамедханова  «Литературная
школа  Абая»,  из-за  которой  в  этом  же  году
молодой ученый был арестован.
Под заголовком «Из сохранившихся писем
из Карлага» собраны письма К.Мухамедханова,
осужденного по 58-й статье на 25 лет. 1952-1955
годы он провел в лагерях. Из этих писем можно
составить впечатление о тех сложных условиях,
в которых проходила жизнь политзаключенного.
Но,  несмотря  на  это,  К.Мухамедханов  смог
сохранить  силу  духа  и  досто инство.  Он
выступает  защитником  интересов  других
осужденных,  что  в  местах  лишения  свободы
является  проявлением  храбрости  и  мужества.
Находясь в Карлаге, он  беспокоится за здоровье
своих детей и супруги.
Бо льшая 


1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   17


©emirb.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал